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Old 02-02-2014, 07:52 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Say what? I was wondering what transit systems didn't have limited coverage. You got anything for that?

Again ... What transit system, bus or rail or trolley, does not have these issues? MARTA is no different.
I'm not following you, some transit systems have better coverage than others, some might cover 90% of routes where people want to go, another might cover 20%. I guess you could call both of them limited, but that's a bit silly. I'm not sure what you mean by limited or not limited.
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Old 02-02-2014, 10:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I haven't ridden transit in ATL but I have in many other cities. Transit doesn't reflect the metro areas broader demographics if you design it in a way that makes it so the minute you can afford not to use it you will avoid it like the plague: with crappy equipment, ill planned routes, unreliable service and limited coverage. ATL transit doesn't go where people need to go so it isn't that popular. Although it is starting to change as more people are choosing to live in areas served by transit in ATL.

Where I live, we have commuter transit that is full of "choice" riders. My local transit, does have a fairly mixed demographic as well. I choose to ride it a few times a week and I have a car to drive.
A car will beat a bus almost 100% of the time. It will beat the train all hours except perhaps rush hour. Why should I drive if I can afford it? I can get there faster, control my environment(heat/cooling/music). I know I always have a seat. I can change my route to run errands and I can put more stuff in my trunk that I can carry and you are surprised that people who have the option of driving usually prefer it?
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Old 02-02-2014, 10:59 PM
 
Location: NYntarctica
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
In any area where snow and ice are rare, such as most of the American south, there is going to be a lot of disruption when those conditions develop. The reason is simple: Where snow and ice are rare, the locality is not equipped to cope with same! It's fascinating how the anti-car fanatics seize on anything and everything to demonize "sprawl", which they apparently consider a dirty word.
Come on druzhok, I'm not anti-car, I go to the NAIAS every year to enjoy the automobile! It's just that cars should be used in moderation. When people can't get home without a car, that's a problem
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Old 02-03-2014, 12:13 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
A car will beat a bus almost 100% of the time. It will beat the train all hours except perhaps rush hour. Why should I drive if I can afford it? I can get there faster, control my environment(heat/cooling/music). I know I always have a seat. I can change my route to run errands and I can put more stuff in my trunk that I can carry and you are surprised that people who have the option of driving usually prefer it?
If I am not driving it is less stressful and I can read a book, catch up on my magazines. Or potentially talk to people I don't know. I can have cocktails and not worry about getting behind the wheel. Not everyone prefers driving. Personally I like to take a break and not drive.....

Not everyone enjoys being forced to drive everywhere, driving is fun when you have the option to do it for pleasure. Not so much when it is the only option.
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Old 02-03-2014, 07:46 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
Come on druzhok, I'm not anti-car, I go to the NAIAS every year to enjoy the automobile! It's just that cars should be used in moderation. When people can't get home without a car, that's a problem
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
If I am not driving it is less stressful and I can read a book, catch up on my magazines. Or potentially talk to people I don't know. I can have cocktails and not worry about getting behind the wheel. Not everyone prefers driving. Personally I like to take a break and not drive.....

Not everyone enjoys being forced to drive everywhere, driving is fun when you have the option to do it for pleasure. Not so much when it is the only option.
I'm aware of the positives of taking transit, however, most of these people drove the cars to work, so they didn't have a lot of options going home. As I understand it, the snow started falling at mid-day, and schools/businesses decided to close around 1 PM. Now my school district has a pretty firm policy that they will not close early, once school has begun for the day. One time, when the problem was with a school itself, power outage or something like that, they did close one school early. But anyway, you have parents picking up their kids. Those of you who don't have kids (most of you on this forum) don't know how "Mama-Bear"-ish parents can get about their kids. I always preferred to let mine take the bus home in bad weather, as I didn't want to drive myself, but not all moms feel that way. So you had a real mess.
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Old 02-03-2014, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Geneva, IL
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Anyone who thinks urban sprawl wasn't an issue hasn't lived in Atlanta, the sprawl is ridiculous.

This was the perfect storm of a combination of factors.

Deal and Reed have admitted there was no emergency plan in place which should have staggered release of schools and employees.

Public transportation is a joke. Marta moved to a Sunday schedule on the morning of the storm and released employees home just like everyone else did. The buses were immobilized on the roads.

Atlanta is very hilly, snow turned to ice. I don't care how experienced a driver you are, driving on ice is not going to end well. The majority of road closures were caused by jack-knifed semis, aka, very experienced drivers.

The greater metropolitan Atlanta is the size of Massachusetts with a population of between 6.5 to 8 million depending on the source.

The public schools are facing severe financial woes, and the number of school days were already cut back, hence the hesitation to call a snow day.

Pre-treating roads is a nice idea, but in a state with significant economic stress does it make sense to have a large fleet of snow equipment that sits unused for decades at a time?

The National Guard was mobilized on Wednesday morning, by Tuesday night it was apparent that they were needed and should have been called then.

Lots of lessons to be learned, but it's not simple, and cannot be blamed on one data point.
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Old 02-03-2014, 08:09 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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I am glad someone from Atlanta chimed in! Thanks, Zimbo.
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Old 02-03-2014, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Geneva, IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I am glad someone from Atlanta chimed in! Thanks, Zimbo.
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Old 02-03-2014, 10:43 AM
 
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Great explanation that covered all the bases, Zimbochick .
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Old 02-03-2014, 03:36 PM
 
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I agree with almost everything Zimbochick said except the National Guard. Calling up the Guard is a major step. Doing it before closing schools, gov't, etc is tough. It also takes time because you don't call up all the guard you generally call up certain units with certain capabilities. That means notifying th ememberes, getting them to come in (They have jobs and families to notify, arrange coverage for, etc) Get them to activate their equipment (often most of it is in some type of storage and needs to have batteries installed, chains installed, fuel tamks filled, etc) All this takes time (probably 6-12 hours for the first wave)

I think the reluctance to close schools in anticipation was wrong, but they don't have much experience with that. Now if they were not to close them ahead of time if they had a similar storm in the next couple of years it would indicate incompetency. It is the rareness of the event that causes the problem. They don't have to practice the particular emergency plan often enough t test things that are written before the details are forgotten.
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