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Old 02-17-2014, 09:21 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Going back very slightly to the thread topic, one way that transit does have an advantage in snowstorms over driving is that (bus) transit runs on busier roads that tend to be kept clear of snow more than local residential streets. At least here, assuming it's just a snowstorm, the sidewalks are generally not icy for several days. If your local streets are still a mess (or your driveway's not plowed or you haven't bothered to clear your car off) you can walk to your transit stop (with snowboots if sidewalks aren't cleared well) where it runs on cleared street.

Rail would be similar, as it usually functions ok except for major snowstorms, depending on region.
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Old 02-17-2014, 09:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Going back very slightly to the thread topic, one way that transit does have an advantage in snowstorms over driving is that (bus) transit runs on busier roads that tend to be kept clear of snow more than local residential streets.
Latest snowstorm here, they shut down all bus service in Essex County (includes the city of Newark) for much of the day.
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Old 02-17-2014, 09:38 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Latest snowstorm here, they shut down all bus service in Essex County (includes the city of Newark) for much of the day.
Odd. Bus service rarely shuts down here, the bus I take was on its regular schedule the last few (almost all?) snowstorms I can remember. A few other buses got changed to a weekend/reduced service schedule.
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Old 02-17-2014, 09:41 PM
 
358 posts, read 360,179 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Then I suggest the drivers learn to read.
Source?
Source?
I see lots of pedestrians on one-way streets every single day. One-way streets sure aren't bothering them.

Lots of assumptions. The only one I'll halfway buy is that businesses prefer two-way streets. The rest is horse hockey.
I suggest you read also - the post right before yours had source from the Denver Business Journal.

I don't appreciate the horse hockey comment.

Please tell me why one-way streets are so great.
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Old 02-18-2014, 10:33 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete. View Post
Why must you be so negative!? You asked a question and I answered it. I'm not going to post links because you will attack the sources anyway. If you really love one-way streets, that's fine
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete. View Post
I suggest you read also - the post right before yours had source from the Denver Business Journal.

I don't appreciate the horse hockey comment.

Please tell me why one-way streets are so great.
Maybe you are a little too sensitive for this forum. I suggest you stay off P&OC altogether. Anything that makes it through the filters gets said there!

I read the article in the Denver Business Journal. From what the poster said, you'd think the city was abandoning all one way streets. They're actually considering changing a few blocks of one way streets near the Union Station and Uptown, which, obviously, isn't downtown.

**Welton Street between 15th and 17th streets, or one block on either side of the 16th Street Mall in the central business district.

• 19th Avenue, between Broadway and Park Avenue, and 20th Avenue between Lincoln Street to Park Avenue in Uptown, northeast of downtown.

• 18th Street between Wynkoop and Blake streets by Denver Union Station in LoDo
.""

Now this statement makes no sense to me:

"Two-way streets appeal to businesses because traffic moves slower on two-way streets compared to one-way streets, making it easier for motorists to stop and patronize a business, Fanganello said."

Virtually all the streets in the area under discussion have 25 mph speed limits, and an actual speed of less than that. What makes it hard for the motorist to stop and patronize a business is the lack of parking in those areas.

I will question sources such as "Atlantic Cities" which is just pop journalism. Find some articles where the reporters understand and report statistics correctly and I'll take them seriously.
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Old 02-18-2014, 10:39 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Maybe you are a little too sensitive for this forum. I suggest you stay off P&OC altogether. Anything that makes it through the filters gets said there!
P&OC does not reflect how the rest of the CD forums should function. If a thread resembles a P&OC thread elsewhere, it's a good sign it's gone badly. A little too sensitive is fine here.
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Old 02-18-2014, 10:45 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,649,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
P&OC does not reflect how the rest of the CD forums should function. If a thread resembles a P&OC thread elsewhere, it's a good sign it's gone badly. A little too sensitive is fine here.
Since you did not delete my post, which that poster felt was negative, or the "horse hockey" comment he objected to, I'm assuming they are considered OK. What some people perceive as negativity is sometimes just disagreement. I'm not going to agree about one way streets w/o some data. I had no idea they were now considered politically incorrect among urbanists.

Also, I thought we weren't supposed to talk about other posters, not that I'm entirely innocent myself.
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Old 02-18-2014, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,394 posts, read 59,880,407 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete. View Post
I don't appreciate the horse hockey comment.
Next time I'll be more graphic, then.

Quote:
Please tell me why one-way streets are so great.
1) More space for bicycle lanes and parking
2) Safer pedestrian crossings
3) Eased congestion
4) Reduced accidents

The only people who seem to believe that two-way streets are safer are armchair bloggers; traffic engineers and city planners believe the opposite.
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Old 02-18-2014, 01:37 PM
 
10,590 posts, read 7,525,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
1) More space for bicycle lanes and parking
2) Safer pedestrian crossings
3) Eased congestion
4) Reduced accidents

The only people who seem to believe that two-way streets are safer are armchair bloggers; traffic engineers and city planners believe the opposite.
One ways increase car speed which in turn reduces pedestrian safety and overall walk-ability.
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Old 02-18-2014, 01:49 PM
 
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To bring this back onto the topic, and trying to catch up on all in this thread: Atlanta needs to shift away from car dependency, that is starting to happen with a lot of project going on. But the source of the ice storm issues is simply failure of the superintendents and bosses not canceling school / work on the day of the storm. The Atlanta metro does not, nor should it keep hundreds of millions of dollars in equipment around for these storms that happen once every few years.

Our even worse ice storm last week demonstrates how it should work. Work from home and let the kids have a snow day.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
A zillion things can be done.

1. When find yourself in a hole -stop digging. No more belt ways, complete moratorium on annexations into
Rational policy is put in place.

2. Zoning has to change everywhere, immediately. Introduce mixed-use neighborhoods; upzone upzone upzone. Replace Euclidean zoning with form-based code. Build densisty from the core out.

4. If Atlanta is like most US cities it has developed a ton of regs over the years that make development in the core a huge obstacle. Strip these away. The great cities in the world developed without the. They do more harm than good.

3. Reconfigure streets to be complex, multi-modal and friendly to uses other than cars.

4. Rediscover the grid. Look at every available opportunity to re-stitch the grid together.

6. Turn the one-way streets into two-way streets.

5. Atlanta likely has a master plan, but it's likely decades out of date. Put together a new one, base it on cities that are doing the right things.

6. Fire the transportation department. Every last person. They will be the biggest impediment to change going forward.

7. Reinvest transportation dollars away from big roads projects. Do little road diets, bike lanes, cycle tracks, all over the central core.

8. After they've done the above - consider making large investments into high capacity transit.

9. Tell every developer of very new greenfield site that not one acre of their land will ever be annexed, nor city services extended to their residents unless: the site is built to a grid and well connected to surrounding communities, and access points provided for connections to future communities, and that developer must develop densely enough that he can demonstrate to the satisfaction of a neutral third party that the tax revenue generated will be sufficient to cover all future infrastructure maintenance costs past the first life cycle.


That's just a brief start

Komeht, I don't think you understand Atlanta. It is a mix of 100+ cities and counties all with their own zoning, planning, and intentions. In Georgia counties compete with cities to provide duplicate services and stopping annexations will do nothing to stop sprawl. But you do make a lot of good points with needing to make the city less car focused, many of which is already being done.
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