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Old 02-02-2014, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,292,241 times
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Check out the following link.

Washington: A world apart | The Washington Post
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Old 02-02-2014, 11:10 AM
 
9,522 posts, read 14,865,612 times
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I don't, but you can see some interesting contrasts in my area. Maplewood and South Orange are adjoining "super zips", adjoining 4 zip codes well below median. The Upper East Side of Manhattan (98) borders East Harlem (29). Greatest contrast I can find is 19106 (Center City, Philadelphia, 95) and 08102 (Camden, NJ, 1); no land border, but the Ben Franklin Bridge crosses right there.
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Old 02-02-2014, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,421 posts, read 59,932,247 times
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What a depressing article - the gap between and segregation of the affluent and the working class is growing wider and wider.
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Old 02-02-2014, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,081 posts, read 16,117,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Nope.

My Zip is in the 65th percentile

It's actually kind of interesting how stark the divide is here. The adjacent Zips are 79, 65, 27, and 17 and keeps going down hill from there. Downtown? 1. Moreover, I'm at the VERY edge of where it very quickly goes from middle-class to not. The Zip that starts three blocks over (27) isn't bad but it goes down hill quickly. Similarly, my neighborhood isn't as nice as would be indicated. It's very much on the fence. We had a lot of definitely lower-class people move in during the real estate bust that didn't really fit in. No buddy, nobody throws shindigs and uses the lawn for extra parking here. I don't really mind them. They're out drinking too much in the front yard, but they scaled down the noise level and gathering size so its reasonable. Plus it's eyes on the street. Also, I don't live next door. I imagine the next door neighbors are less than thrilled.

Last edited by Malloric; 02-02-2014 at 12:18 PM..
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Old 02-02-2014, 12:45 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,035 posts, read 102,723,474 times
Reputation: 33083
You know, whenever these discussions of "Old Money" come up here on CD, I always say I come from an area of "No Money". For the most part, it looks like I'm right.
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Old 02-02-2014, 12:53 PM
 
23 posts, read 20,943 times
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Thats pretty cool!

I thought the state of Michigan was abandoned though!

Do people really still live there?
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Old 02-02-2014, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,720,175 times
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I live in the 96th percentile and the nearby places are in the 70th. Which lower incomes.

The Bay Area is very very class segregated, and I am well aware most people I know grew up middle class with college educated parents. What this article doesn't talk about is the huge wealth gap between ethnic groups.

I can look at the circumstance of my white peers versus the non white ones. Because of generational wealth and white middle-class people tend have much higher reserves then there the other nonwhite people. And this was reflected in differences between the college graduation experience, my white peers likely received a good sized monetary graduation gifts.

Given the starting point whether they might been able to afford a car, make a trip, pay down debt or have extra money to use for the deposit for new apartment. Less need to start earning a paycheck right away post college. Their parents were also more likely to have investments or retirement savings that could be helpful when trying to save up for an expensive down payment somewhere like here.

These little advantages play a big role as we get older, and we haven't come close to closing the wealth and opportunity gap. And let's not forget about the comments of social capital, even middle class people,of color do not seem to have the same connections and their white peers, as life goes on.

It is really depressing and we aren't making progress here. I am in my 30s and I still see the gaps in my own generation. With the increasing stratification of income it is only going to get worse. For those of us in very expensive metros, even a high wage doesn't guarantee stability, and the placement is very precarious. These days, if one high wage adult loses their earnings, families can't afford to maintain their lifestyles. Or even pay the mortgage, when the average home price, in a place like mine is about $750k, and a 2 bedroom condo averages about $450k.
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Old 02-02-2014, 03:47 PM
 
12,313 posts, read 15,224,755 times
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It doesn't tell the whole story. For example it may be where both spouses are college graduates with jobs paying over $60K. But because they are recent graduates they may be saddled with big student loan payments. Indeed some not so Super Zips may be better off. In addition the USPS often lumps high income areas with low income ones for efficiency in delivery.
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Old 02-02-2014, 07:07 PM
 
56,756 posts, read 81,102,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
It doesn't tell the whole story. For example it may be where both spouses are college graduates with jobs paying over $60K. But because they are recent graduates they may be saddled with big student loan payments. Indeed some not so Super Zips may be better off. In addition the USPS often lumps high income areas with low income ones for efficiency in delivery.
Good points and this is why I would use this website too: USA.com : Location information of the United States

It breaks things down by census tract, census block group and census block too. It also shows economic info by different variables. For instance, here is economic info for this first ring suburban neighborhood of Buffalo: Census Tract 009501 in Erie County, New York Income and Careers
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Old 02-04-2014, 08:23 PM
 
Location: North by Northwest
7,442 posts, read 9,897,070 times
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Grew up in one; don't live in one at the moment (college neighborhood, yo).
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