U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 02-08-2014, 12:16 AM
 
124 posts, read 121,598 times
Reputation: 34

Advertisements

I live in a backwards former industrial area of the US and thinking about something totally theoretical. Suppose you establish a brand new city/town and since I know nothing about real-world planning-but I'm curious about learning it-and I have a potential interest in developing real communities of people, what is the way to do that with transportation and infrastructure.

I'm looking for established, proven ideas. Once again, I'm very new to this fascination of regional planning.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-08-2014, 12:20 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,674,744 times
Reputation: 26666
1st up there is no need for a new planned from scratch town. Any such place would be far removed from infrastructure and anything else. And it isn't a realistic premise. These days think adaptive reuse, retrofit, infill, and reimagine, within existing places.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2014, 12:23 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,674,744 times
Reputation: 26666
Enjoy: The Better Block | betterblock.org provides news and information on Better Block projects occurring around the world.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2014, 04:20 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,740,386 times
Reputation: 32304
Default What is a "real" community of people?

Quote:
Originally Posted by gousa14 View Post
I live in a backwards former industrial area of the US and thinking about something totally theoretical. Suppose you establish a brand new city/town and since I know nothing about real-world planning-but I'm curious about learning it-and I have a potential interest in developing real communities of people, what is the way to do that with transportation and infrastructure.

I'm looking for established, proven ideas. Once again, I'm very new to this fascination of regional planning.
In order to understand the original post, I would have to know what you mean by "real" communities of people. Do you currently live in a "fake" community? If so, can you describe what is fake about it? Or perhaps the key here is your statement about living in a "backwards" former industrial area. Can you briefly describe the area where you live - naming it would be helpful for starters. Is "backwards" a synonym for dysfunctional, such as Detroit? I'm not claiming you're wrong about anything - in order to make such a claim I would first have to understand what you are saying.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2014, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,383 posts, read 59,846,787 times
Reputation: 54028
Quote:
Originally Posted by gousa14 View Post
I live in a backwards former industrial area of the US and thinking about something totally theoretical. Suppose you establish a brand new city/town and since I know nothing about real-world planning-but I'm curious about learning it-and I have a potential interest in developing real communities of people, what is the way to do that with transportation and infrastructure.
Aren't you from Erie? What part of that community isn't "real"?

Instead of starting something new, why don't you work on making your community better?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2014, 06:17 PM
 
124 posts, read 121,598 times
Reputation: 34
Yes. I'm from Erie. By "real" community I am talking about a physical place defined by boundaries and not a virtual community such as this one. I have nothing against virtual communities, though.

And, since it's been explained already that new ideas from scratch are unfeasible, let me redirect it to ideas on already existing regions/communities.

Third, "backwards" means dysfunctional (although I think Erie is more or less than the other Midwestern former industrial cities), some may even think it's too conservative.

Unfortunately, I don't have all the answers for community improvement since that takes a good knowledge of basic planning and economic/political factors. But I like what Scott Enterprises of Erie has been doing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top