U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 02-11-2014, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,504,059 times
Reputation: 7830

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by AtkinsonDan View Post
Railroad tracks also cut through the landscape. When I lived in Quincy Massachusetts my residence was between I-93 and the MBTA's red line. Both corridors had underpasses and overpasses. Neither one was any harder to cross on foot than the other although the highway had more local roads crossing under and over it. The red line was more of a barrier at ground level in some sections.

My point being that railroads and highways equally disrupt the landscape.
I am not saying they don't, both cut through the landscape, the difference is you don't have to account for onramps and offramps with rail. Also the typical American highway tends to be much wider when there is a lack of alternative transportation options.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-11-2014, 06:53 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,987 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33050
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I am not saying they don't, both cut through the landscape, the difference is you don't have to account for onramps and offramps with rail. Also the typical American highway tends to be much wider when there is a lack of alternative transportation options.
For the nth time, NOT EVERY ROAD HAS ON/OFF RAMPS!!!!!!!!!!! And you do have to account for rail stations!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2014, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,504,059 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
IF, IF, IF! Give it a rest! You have to deal with things the way they are, not the way you wish they were. People thought they were doing the right thing at the time. Some day, people will look back at us and laugh, too!
Huh? Your post makes no sense to what you are responding to, did you actually read what I wrote? Who looks back at the destruction from the urban renewal era of the 50s and 60s and laughs?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2014, 06:58 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,987 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33050
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Huh? Your post makes no sense to what you are responding to, did you actually read what I wrote? Who looks back at the destruction from the urban renewal era of the 50s and 60s and laughs?
I think you urbanists do think the planners of the 50s/60s were foolish. Isn't that laughable? Some day, people are going to look back at the 2010s and the billions upon billions of dollars spent on light rail and think we were nuts.

Last edited by nei; 02-11-2014 at 07:16 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2014, 07:09 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I think you urbanists do think the planners of the 50s/60s were foolish. Isn't that laughable? Some day, people are going to look back at the 2010s and the billions upon billions of dollars spent on light rail and think we were nuts.
No. With hindsight, one can look back and see what worked well and didn't, though people may disagree what they consider good.

These two aren't similar at all. One is (possibly) a waste of money; the other is destroying areas that can never come back.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2014, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,504,059 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Quit being so insulting. I think you urbanists do think the planners of the 50s/60s were foolish. Isn't that laughable? Some day, people are going to look back at the 2010s and the billions upon billions of dollars spent on light rail and think we were nuts.
No, I don't think that, light rail has been a good investment for cities that have done it right and it is proving to be an effective way to provide rail transit without having to build a costly heavy rail subway system.

I think the ideas of the 50/60s were destructive, not something I consider laughable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2014, 07:15 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
For the nth time, NOT EVERY ROAD HAS ON/OFF RAMPS!!!!!!!!!!! And you do have to account for rail stations!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
All highways have on/off ramps, which is what the quoted posts were about. Even accounting rail stations, rail generally takes less room than a highway. Here's one of the busiser stations on Long Island:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=mineo...74.78,,0,10.14

there are shops and an office building next door. Within a block or two away, a lot of buildings. Few highways have as much nearby. Look at the difference between the highway and rail line:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=mineo...+New+York&z=15
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2014, 07:19 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,987 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33050
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
No. With hindsight, one can look back and see what worked well and didn't, though people may disagree what they consider good.

These two aren't similar at all. One is (possibly) a waste of money; the other is destroying areas that can never come back.
There is construction and destruction going on with these light rail systems as well, just not on as large a scale as urban renewal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2014, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,504,059 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
For the nth time, NOT EVERY ROAD HAS ON/OFF RAMPS!!!!!!!!!!! And you do have to account for rail stations!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Last time I checked you walk into a rail station, not drive into them, so they are less dangerous for pedestrians.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2014, 07:22 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,987 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33050
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
All highways have on/off ramps, which is what the quoted posts were about. Even accounting rail stations, rail generally takes less room than a highway. Here's one of the busiser stations on Long Island:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=mineo...74.78,,0,10.14

there are shops and an office building next door. Within a block or two away, a lot of buildings. Few highways have as much nearby. Look at the difference between the highway and rail line:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=mineo...+New+York&z=15
I guess it depends on how you define "highway". Certainly not all 4+ lane roads are limited access.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top