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Old 02-10-2014, 10:25 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,816,131 times
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If you are stuck in traffic you are the traffic

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Old 02-10-2014, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,650,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
what's a cassette?

You forgot to include iPods
off topic but fitting:

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Old 02-10-2014, 10:57 PM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,713,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
If you are stuck in traffic you are the traffic
Now imagine each one of those people is driving their own car. . .
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Old 02-10-2014, 11:11 PM
 
409 posts, read 388,763 times
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Packed up Subway in Japan - YouTube

And after this subway ride, Thom Yorke was inspired to write "packed like sardines in a crushed tin box".
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Old 02-10-2014, 11:16 PM
 
409 posts, read 388,763 times
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Caos total no metro de Pequim - YouTube
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Old 02-10-2014, 11:18 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,650,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
Cars beat the cost and inflexibility of transit.
Cars also offer independence from transit - a good and necessary thing since transit inherently doesn't serve the vast majority of the populace anyway.
It depends, I find transit frees me up to read my book! So I actually find it more freeing. This week I wish I had a transit commute. I need to read my book club book by Sunday and I haven't started LOL!

It also frees me up to drink cocktails when I go out, if I don't have to worry about driving.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MidValleyDad View Post
Well considering I still need to own a car to get to the Train or bus and to haul kids to soccor matches and go shopping. The only thing I save is the incremental cost of gas, maintenance and parking. And I gain flexibility of being able to come in early (or stay late when needed) When I was working downtown Car to commuter bus to Metro was fine as long as I could walk out of the office by 4:27 (not 4:29 or I missed the Metro that connected with the bus)

It is all a tradeoff each makes their decision based on their priorities
I posted an article in another thread, about how increasing off-peak transit helps the system on the whole. People are a lot more likely to take transit if they aren't worried about missing the last bus! The commute bus to SF from ny neighborhood stops running at 8pm, and after 7 it only runs 2X. But I also know I can take the subway and a connecting bus that stops close by till midnight. So it was never a big worry if I missed the last commuter bus. I had plenty of options. You would likely reconsider transit to downtown, if you knew there was frequent service till 10.

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That has more to do with the poor job we have done when it comes to investing in public transit over the past 100 years.
Agreed. Every time I see a map of the dismantled Key Route, I get so annoyed! It basically goes everywhere I over go in my 10 mile radius. There were 2 lines within a 3 block radius of my current apartment!

Quote:
Originally Posted by impala096 View Post
There is no indication that transit is gaining popularity in America.
Well, not quite, there are marked differences in reasons and by ethnic group. See the link I posted above about off-peak travel.

US PIRG's study on young people and transit: http://www.uspirg.org/sites/pirg/fil...on%20vUS_0.pdf

The "younger" people are living differently. And I am at the edge of Gen X/Gen Y, and it has been trending in my own social circle, even as people have kids. One of my friends bikes 12 miles to work in the spring/summer/fall. She is still looking for the elusive walkable community in her budget...
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Old 02-11-2014, 12:02 AM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,953,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
Now imagine each one of those people is driving their own car. . .
Yup, the average rush hour subway in NYC or BART in SF is carrying about 1,2000 people.

At average rush hour occupancy of 1.2 per car that's 1,000 cars to move the same amount of people.

On a 3 lane interstate that's 1.25 miles of bumper-to-bumper traffic . . . and if it's free flowing it's more like 5 miles.
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Old 02-11-2014, 05:00 AM
 
2,824 posts, read 3,347,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Had our cities focused on renovating themselves and expanding rail in the 50s rather than expanding outward and destroying urban fabrics of the inner cities it would have been much more feasible.
"our cities"?
"urban fabric"?
"destroyed"?

Quote:
Unfortunately we did the opposite of that and are left with sprawling suburbs surrounding our cities making it much harder to provide adequate transit to everywhere when most suburban areas lack the density and connection to anything to make transit work, thus forcing us to live with being an auto-centric society.
You can't even provide adequate transit to points in the city much less "the burbs". There is a connection between suburbs and higher population suburbs (aka "cities"). The connection is called a "road". Sometimes I have to use them to travel from the less populated suburb to the more populated suburb/city. I prefer to use them to leave the more populated suburb/city to travel to the less populated suburb.

Quote:
On the other hand, transit can provide a benefit for cities that did protect their urban fabric and rail can be used in a commuter fashion for those that do work in employment centers that have high workforces.
"urban fabric" again?
Rail is a pipe dream promoted by delusional urbanists in most places. The rail tends to cost more than claimed and gets underutilized by those who could use it. Finally the rail fails to serve virtually everyone else.

Quote:
Also having to drive to get to a commuter station isn't a faux solution if it gets you off the limited number of highways and roadways leading into a downtown, that is a real solution for light density suburbs, and in many cases, it is the only alternative solution.
It's a faux solution because the anti-car zealots can't admit that the transit doesn't solve the "car dependence" so often decried as justification for rail and other transit modes. Under the analogies given the "solution" only creates more "dependencies".

The other problem is that the urbanists try to use this as justification for further limiting highways and roadways in order to force dependence upon rail and other modes of transit and to eliminate modes of travel offering independence such as the car.
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Idaho
836 posts, read 1,376,434 times
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Buses are for poor people; glad I can live without em.
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Old 02-11-2014, 08:14 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,985 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Personally I prefer the midwest and west coast grid over the old mess of streets that you find on the east coast.
To be fair, Pittsburgh's old "cow paths converted to streets" as my father called them, are kind of charming. Charmingly unsafe in the winter, but you can't do anything about the hills. Most of the main roads are on top of, or at the bottom of, a ridge, to keep them reasonably flat. There's no way they could put that city on a grid.

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
What's so great about highways cutting through the landscape, dividing neighborhoods?
Who said anything about highways? Rail systems take up far more land than surface streets. And rail certainly divides up a city. Ever heard the expression "other side of the tracks"?
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