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Old 02-20-2014, 03:16 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,026,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Mixed-use isn't a black/white, it's a gradient. For example, a condo building with no ground floor is, by definition, single-use. But what you're usually looking at is the neighborhood composition. Or as your link says "mixed use is—in a broad sense—any urban, suburban or village development, or even a single building," emphasis added.
This goes at the high end of mixed use:

https://www.google.com/maps?q=East+V...289.54,,0,1.15

Shops on the ground floor on part of the street, other spots it's just residential. Does it qualify as a residential neighborhood (not always obvious what that means). Go further east and there are less (or no) shops. And yes, this is the same that was a tenement slum (well, is in that the tenements are still there, in the view) with a population density of nearly 400k/sq mile, maybe the highest in the developed world 100 years ago.

 
Old 02-20-2014, 03:26 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,674,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Perhaps we can agree that there are degrees of mixed use, and some might be good and others not so good?

Small shops (or even an a small office building) a block away, sound ok. A steel mill? Umm, no.
Well, why not? After all, we escaped unscathed! Just east of the steel mill were some railroad tracks, then the Beaver River. Sounds like a real safe neighborhood, no?

Heck, the whole town was that way. Everyone was withing walking distance of a factory, if not the rail yards and the river. Gives a new meaning to "walkability" doesn't it?

(Sarcasm on!)

Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Why not people lived that way for years. Heck cities sorted themselves into industrial and retail areas long before the rise of burbs.
Yes, some of us have tried to say that. This "mixed use" stuff is kind of a figment of some urban planners' imaginations. The actual retail in my town was several blocks away.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,554,726 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Well, then, I lived in a "mixed use" neighborhood when I was a kid. There was a steel mill right down the street, about 1 1/2 blocks away. My mom used to tie my brother and I up to the front porch so we wouldn't get hit by a semi if we ran out into the street.

For those of you who don't know, I'm talking about a heavy manufacturing plant where they made steel.

(You knew that was coming, didn't you, nei?)
Yes, small towns like the one you grew up in are often times good examples of classic mixed use, something suburban developments should strive to achieve today.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 03:37 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,674,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Yes, small towns like the one you grew up in are often times good examples of classic mixed use, something suburban developments should strive to achieve today.
You have got to be kidding! Do you think young moms liked tying up their kids so they wouldn't get hit by a freaking semi traveling up/down the street? Do you have any idea how the soot came in through the screen doors in the summer? I assume you'll be the first to buy a house next door to the factory where you can raise your kid. Better get some rope.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 03:42 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,026,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post


Yes, some of us have tried to say that. This "mixed use" stuff is kind of a figment of some urban planners' imaginations. The actual retail in my town was several blocks away.
Well then, that counts as mixed use, to a certain extent. So not imagination.

As for shops on the same street as housing, that is common in very dense cities. Many spots in Manhattan and even more so Paris.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 03:51 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,863,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Well then, that counts as mixed use, to a certain extent. So not imagination.

As for shops on the same street as housing, that is common in very dense cities. Many spots in Manhattan and even more so Paris.
For the most part where I live nope. Housing is mostly down side streets that have few shops. The shops tend to be on Main streets. They may be walkable from the side streets or there might be an apartment over them but the tendency is to put the retail away from the residential.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 03:56 PM
 
358 posts, read 360,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
This "mixed use" stuff is kind of a figment of some urban planners' imaginations. The actual retail in my town was several blocks away.
Even real estate companies such as Colliers recognizes mixed-use, so it's not something that some fringe planner made up.

Mixed-Use | Colliers International
 
Old 02-20-2014, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,703,335 times
Reputation: 26671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Well, then, I lived in a "mixed use" neighborhood when I was a kid. There was a steel mill right down the street, about 1 1/2 blocks away. My mom used to tie my brother and I up to the front porch so we wouldn't get hit by a semi if we ran out into the street.

For those of you who don't know, I'm talking about a heavy manufacturing plant where they made steel.

(You knew that was coming, didn't you, nei?)
I'd say not all combos of mixed use are compatible with ideal livability.

Like, a elementary school and an "Adult" "xxx" video store wouldn't be the best single use building.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 04:12 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,863,448 times
Reputation: 1439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete. View Post
Even real estate companies such as Colliers recognizes mixed-use, so it's not something that some fringe planner made up.

Mixed-Use | Colliers International
No, but it is mixed use for a particular reason beyond some idealized version of an city. Often they want to develop a property but the intended uses wouldn't generate enough revenue or they think they can make more revenue by combining uses. It isn't about density or walkability. It is about pure profit.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,403 posts, read 59,899,964 times
Reputation: 54052
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Yes, small towns like the one you grew up in are often times good examples of classic mixed use, something suburban developments should strive to achieve today.
Just what everyone wants - to live two blocks away from heavy industry.
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