U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 02-20-2014, 05:30 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,857,480 times
Reputation: 1439

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
True. Generally speaking, most stuff that doesn't emit any toxic fumes (or noise) can go together. Unless you are like this Socal town and you think Siracha is a toxic fume.

Sriracha Factory Shut Down Over 'Offensive' Odors
There are also issues of crowds, noise, and parking to deal with.

 
Old 02-20-2014, 05:31 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,937,844 times
Reputation: 14804
Meh. Even if not offensive, I'd prefer not to smell it all the time. I used to live walking distance from a Coca-Cola bottling plant. But there was some buffer between it and homes. Right nearby there was an odd syrupy smell, don't want to smell it at home.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 05:43 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33058
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Gasp, there is nothing wrong with suburbs, I grew up in one and my parents have always lived in a suburb.

Now I can only assume that not every street in this small town you lived in until the age of 7 had semi-trucks running up and down the street. Which would mean there were better streets to live on than the one you lived on. Now was there anything at all that you liked about Beaver Falls? Now if you take that steel mill and replace it with a tech company or something that fits in with modern day industry, then you don't have to worry about the soot.
You could use a few lessons in tact!

Actually, my father, b. 1914, was one of the few people I knew back then who even graduated from college, let alone got a master's degree. Many of the people in that town of his age were not even high school graduates! There were people working as "engineers" at his steel mill who hadn't graduated from HS. Most of the college graduates were teachers who went to the local college (in the picture of the football stadium), which, while a fine school, didn't offer a lot. My father took the train to Pittsburgh to Carnegie Mellon (then Carnegie Tech) after work for his undergrad and the U of Pittsburgh for his MS. My mom was one of the few women of her era (b. 1921) to have an education beyond high school. She was a nurse. So no, we weren't living "on the wrong side of the tracks". They probably bought the house w/o thinking about the mill traffic. Even when we moved, they hoped to stay in town, but couldn't find anything.

That mill site is an epa toxic waste site. They're not going to build anything there soon.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,655,359 times
Reputation: 26651
Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
There are also issues of crowds, noise, and parking to deal with.
I don't know if I'd call it an issue. You need to plan for that stuff in any development you create. You can reuse congestion if people can stay close by and cut down on trips. Even if someone has to drive to one "strip mall" but they can do everything they were planning to do that day in the same price without moving their car, it is pretty good.

And then if some of the other people can walk/bus/bike and get all of their stuff done at that place and take away XX percentage of the drivers, congestion decreases more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Meh. Even if not offensive, I'd prefer not to smell it all the time. I used to live walking distance from a Coca-Cola bottling plant. But there was some buffer between it and homes. Right nearby there was an odd syrupy smell, don't want to smell it at home.
Yup, totally make sense. I might just say large scale food or other industry should be on the "edges" of the neighborhood. But we do have some really interesting food production things in the middle of the neighborhood. But none too large I can think of.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,371 posts, read 59,817,368 times
Reputation: 54016
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Meh. Even if not offensive, I'd prefer not to smell it all the time. I used to live walking distance from a Coca-Cola bottling plant. But there was some buffer between it and homes. Right nearby there was an odd syrupy smell, don't want to smell it at home.
I've lived near:

a) a brewery. As appetizing as that sounds , the odor of roasting hops (or whatever they do to them) is quite nasty. I was glad to move.
b) a potato chip factory. This place did not change its oil nearly often enough. Fortunately, the odor came my way only during an odd wind direction.
c) a Keebler factory. Alas, the chocolate chip cookies I bought in the store never tasted as good as they smelled on the wind from the factory. The smell of Pecan Sandies was exquisite. Out of the three, though, this one was a winner.

Point is ... No, I don't want to be living near factories of any kind. Even if there are no odors, there is still traffic from employees, and commercial truck traffic for delivery and distribution. Zoning has flaws, but is very useful in separating industrial uses from others.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,655,359 times
Reputation: 26651
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I've lived near:


c) a Keebler factory. Alas, the chocolate chip cookies I bought in the store never tasted as good as they smelled on the wind from the factory. The smell of Pecan Sandies was exquisite. Out of the three, though, this one was a winner.
There goes the neighborhood! Were the Keebler elves causing trouble after hours?
 
Old 02-20-2014, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,371 posts, read 59,817,368 times
Reputation: 54016
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
There goes the neighborhood! Were the Keebler elves causing trouble after hours?
LMAO!

It must have been them that finger-painted cuss words on the back of my garage ... It couldn't have been the little angels (according to their parents) who lived behind me.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,509,053 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Meh. Even if not offensive, I'd prefer not to smell it all the time. I used to live walking distance from a Coca-Cola bottling plant. But there was some buffer between it and homes. Right nearby there was an odd syrupy smell, don't want to smell it at home.
I wished I was in Portland back in the day when the Henry's brewery was still functioning downtown. I hear the area use to smell like that wheat and barley beer smell.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,509,053 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You could use a few lessons in tact!

Actually, my father, b. 1914, was one of the few people I knew back then who even graduated from college, let alone got a master's degree. Many of the people in that town of his age were not even high school graduates! There were people working as "engineers" at his steel mill who hadn't graduated from HS. Most of the college graduates were teachers who went to the local college (in the picture of the football stadium), which, while a fine school, didn't offer a lot. My father took the train to Pittsburgh to Carnegie Mellon (then Carnegie Tech) after work for his undergrad and the U of Pittsburgh for his MS. My mom was one of the few women of her era (b. 1921) to have an education beyond high school. She was a nurse. So no, we weren't living "on the wrong side of the tracks". They probably bought the house w/o thinking about the mill traffic. Even when we moved, they hoped to stay in town, but couldn't find anything.

That mill site is an epa toxic waste site. They're not going to build anything there soon.
Honestly, I don't care about Beaver Falls, but you are missing the point I am trying to make, lets say you take that small town mixed use model and use it when designing a new suburban mixed use development which gives the same sense of walkable community you grew up in for the first 7 years of your life. It is a template that many of our suburban neighborhoods should follow.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,509,053 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I've lived near:

a) a brewery. As appetizing as that sounds , the odor of roasting hops (or whatever they do to them) is quite nasty. I was glad to move.
b) a potato chip factory. This place did not change its oil nearly often enough. Fortunately, the odor came my way only during an odd wind direction.
c) a Keebler factory. Alas, the chocolate chip cookies I bought in the store never tasted as good as they smelled on the wind from the factory. The smell of Pecan Sandies was exquisite. Out of the three, though, this one was a winner.

Point is ... No, I don't want to be living near factories of any kind. Even if there are no odors, there is still traffic from employees, and commercial truck traffic for delivery and distribution. Zoning has flaws, but is very useful in separating industrial uses from others.
That is where urban planning comes into effect, the key with that kind of industry is to provide traffic routes that don't involve running through residential neighborhoods, yet easy for people who live in those nearby neighborhoods able to easily commute to work using alternative forms of transportation.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top