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Old 02-20-2014, 08:18 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,861,397 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
There goes the neighborhood! Were the Keebler elves causing trouble after hours?
Having worked at these type of places, after hours could be really late to never. Some run 24 hours a day and still others run like 20 hours a day(2 ten hour shifts), and they usually start running early(think like 4a.m. or 6a.m.) for when the first trucks may arrive.

 
Old 02-20-2014, 08:20 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,861,397 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That is where urban planning comes into effect, the key with that kind of industry is to provide traffic routes that don't involve running through residential neighborhoods, yet easy for people who live in those nearby neighborhoods able to easily commute to work using alternative forms of transportation.
Nah Traffic routes will run near houses that are close to main streets or large streets to get to the factory. The factories in town don't have their own road system for the most part. This is why Retail tends also to be on those large streets and why those large street are built to move traffic quickly.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,390 posts, read 59,868,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That is where urban planning comes into effect, the key with that kind of industry is to provide traffic routes that don't involve running through residential neighborhoods, yet easy for people who live in those nearby neighborhoods able to easily commute to work using alternative forms of transportation.
Considering the newest of these neighborhoods was built between 1910 and 1930, I highly doubt there was much planning involved.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 08:32 PM
 
3,093 posts, read 3,195,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You have got to be kidding! Do you think young moms liked tying up their kids so they wouldn't get hit by a freaking semi traveling up/down the street? Do you have any idea how the soot came in through the screen doors in the summer? I assume you'll be the first to buy a house next door to the factory where you can raise your kid. Better get some rope.
I know about that! - The soot and traffic was common in many manufacturing towns. In Sparrows Point MD Beth Steel owned the whole town! When they wanted to expand the mill they either filled in more of the waterfront or tore down some houses, or stores, or the Church! And soot went everywhere
 
Old 02-20-2014, 08:45 PM
 
3,093 posts, read 3,195,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You have got to be kidding! Do you think young moms liked tying up their kids so they wouldn't get hit by a freaking semi traveling up/down the street? Do you have any idea how the soot came in through the screen doors in the summer? I assume you'll be the first to buy a house next door to the factory where you can raise your kid. Better get some rope.
Koppel Steel? We go past it when we drive to Ellwood City for Creampuffs when visiting my daughter up that way!
 
Old 02-20-2014, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,538,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Considering the newest of these neighborhoods was built between 1910 and 1930, I highly doubt there was much planning involved.
Well that is where we learn from the mistakes in the past and try to correct them in future planning.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
3,718 posts, read 4,788,682 times
Reputation: 1454
Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
So strip malls, as I'm sure we can all agree, are hideous uses of space and are very inefficient in the way they use land. They swallow up space for parking and are pretty much impossible for any pedestrian to access without having to slip between moving and parked cars and hope they don't get hit. And what's worse is that they are so common as to be ubiquitous
So what are you suggesting that we do then? All I've read here is a rant that is riddled with spotlight fallacy and confirmation bias.
 
Old 02-20-2014, 09:51 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by MidValleyDad View Post
Koppel Steel? We go past it when we drive to Ellwood City for Creampuffs when visiting my daughter up that way!
Moltrup Steel. There were steel mills everywhere around there. My dad worked for US Steel in Ellwod City.
 
Old 02-21-2014, 08:24 AM
 
358 posts, read 360,119 times
Reputation: 306
Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
No, but it is mixed use for a particular reason beyond some idealized version of an city. Often they want to develop a property but the intended uses wouldn't generate enough revenue or they think they can make more revenue by combining uses. It isn't about density or walkability. It is about pure profit.
Exactly! The profit is there because there is demand for it.
 
Old 02-21-2014, 08:40 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Gasp, there is nothing wrong with suburbs, I grew up in one and my parents have always lived in a suburb.

Now I can only assume that not every street in this small town you lived in until the age of 7 had semi-trucks running up and down the street. Which would mean there were better streets to live on than the one you lived on. Now was there anything at all that you liked about Beaver Falls? Now if you take that steel mill and replace it with a tech company or something that fits in with modern day industry, then you don't have to worry about the soot.
Even if IBM, or (let's be hip here) Google located on this toxic waste dump, there would still be plenty of traffic on all the surrounding streets. I mean, at Google you get to choose which 16 hours of the day you'll work, right? The workers would likely come from all over the general area, and drive to work. You can't replicate the old factory towns where everyone walked to work. I can remember as a little kid, seeing people walking to/from work. Now by my day, they probably drove and parked close by, but in my father's day, they likely walked from home.

Cars gave people mobility. You can't put that genie back in the bottle. This is what "New Urbanism" is trying to do. One is supposed to live, work and shop within the confines of the community. That's what I mean when I say they're trying to recreate New England/midwestern farm towns, and then nei comes along and says in New England it's more factory towns. But you get the idea.
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