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Old 02-12-2014, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,509,053 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Depends on where you're going, why you're going there, weather, etc. Imagining a variable or two where driving would be preferable is not rocket science, even for the anti-car crowd.
Actually I figured out where he lives and I can see why someone would want to drive a few blocks when it is below freezing. I know I tend to not want to go outside when it gets extremely cold here in the NYC metro, unfortunately I don't have anything that is just two blocks away to walk to where I live so it is a good 15 minute walk each way to get to anything remotely commercial.

 
Old 02-12-2014, 09:52 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,655,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Yea sounds confusing.

Don't they have those infamous "strip mall signs" ?
Ha, I saw one I recognized for Union Landing, that I posted about earlier.

So this one doesn't have a sign for the whole plaza and 90% of the stuff doesn't have a sign. So they decide to put the signs closest to the store, but each store only has one placement on the sign. And if you for example, don't drive on the street with Pac and Save, you'll never see the sign!
 
Old 02-12-2014, 09:55 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
They are common where someone tore down the old stores/buildings(which are often a mismatch for the current demographics of the area or modern use) and put them in. They are not extremely common in Chicago but not unseen. They often have some connection to the city sidewalk so that they are accessible by walking and only the ones with a big box store will have a huge parking lot.
Your streetviews don't work. I noticed Chicago had some, though not much strip malls in places that obviously didn't have them. I was surprised to see this, considering how built up it was:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=super...59.85,,0,-5.85

I was a bit surprised and puzzled how that managed to fit in. I'm most familiar with New York City, which would rarely have a surface lot that big in an older, built-up, non formerly industrial area, especially right near a subway stop. Often supermarkets don't have parking. Sometimes you get a neighborhood with a supermarket with and without a parking lot on different streets. More pedestrian-oriented street:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=super...82.24,,0,-0.73

more auto-oriented street:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=super...55.28,,0,-5.12

note how it's right next to an old warehouse. Most businesses in the neighborhood are on the pedestrian-oriented street, most walk for local trips, plus the subway runs underneath that street. The outer parts of NYC and older Long Island areas often do the opposite of Chicago: stick non-strip malls in more suburban areas on busy arterials, which would look painfully to parallel park on:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Hills...271.83,,0,2.38

Sometimes when driving and I encounter these I park on a side street. Though the last time I did the street was empty so I just fed the meter.
 
Old 02-12-2014, 10:26 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
It is really interesting, but all of the studies show, people who walk to the store actually buy more often than the drivers. [link to one study: http://www.theatlanticcities.com/com...drivers/4066/]

Each trip is smaller, but they come back more often. (There are a few dozen studies that show a similar result)
Link won't open with my kindle, but frankly I don't think much of Atlantic Cities. They usually put their own spin on these studies and don't understand statistics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I agree that grocery shopping is a shop where a car is particularly convenient. However, most stores in strip malls are not supermarkets.

And in areas where very few shops have parking, generally if any shop has parking, the supermarket is the one most likely to have it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Chicago weather isn't that different from the east coast, especially away from the coast. Nor is it that unfamiliar. I just don't see the big deal most of the time, I managed the weather before a car. Reads a bit "weather wimpy" to me. And it's nice to be outside unless the weather is truly nasty, I'm inside enough, who wants to be stuck inside all the time?

I tend to prefer walking over cars partly because you get to be outside. And a place where you can walk regularly is a place where I can feel a bit more connected to in an intangible way, with a car you're closed and flying past.
Having lived both in the NE and the Midwest, I beg to differ. It feels colder in the Midwest. Plus so many of you post from the standpoint of singles or couples at most.
 
Old 02-12-2014, 10:30 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,857,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Your streetviews don't work. I noticed Chicago had some, though not much strip malls in places that obviously didn't have them. I was surprised to see this, considering how built up it was:


I was a bit surprised and puzzled how that managed to fit in. I'm most familiar with New York City, which would rarely have a surface lot that big in an older, built-up, non formerly industrial area, especially right near a subway stop. Often supermarkets don't have parking. Sometimes you get a neighborhood with a supermarket with and without a parking lot on different streets. More pedestrian-oriented street:


Sometimes when driving and I encounter these I park on a side street. Though the last time I did the street was empty so I just fed the meter.
I have shopped there a few times(not near me) but near the Kennedy and a busy Metra station that serves a couple of lines so easy to drive to. A grocery store that large without a parking lot of it's own would be unheard of here. Only the smaller grocery stores might do without parking.

It fitted in because people wanted the kinds of stores found in that mall. That mall has a jewel grocery store(something people drive to), block buster(that recently closed but again something people might drive to), a Kmart (same) and Dunkin Doughnuts(some thing someone might pick up on the way to work) and a cleaners(something people tend to drive to) as well as an Staples(stuff that might need to be carried away in a car).

The two restaurants (Chinese and Oberwise ice cream) have additional entrances accessable from another street and the other two store the Dunkin doughnuts\31 flavors and the subway are near the street in the photo.

Last edited by chirack; 02-12-2014 at 10:48 PM..
 
Old 02-12-2014, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,655,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
It is really interesting, but all of the studies show, people who walk to the store actually buy more often than the drivers. [link to one study: http://www.theatlanticcities.com/com...drivers/4066/]

Each trip is smaller, but they come back more often. (There are a few dozen studies that show a similar result)
Looks like the link is freaking out:
Cyclists and Pedestrians Can End Up Spending More Each Month Than Drivers - Emily Badger - The Atlantic Cities

But anyway, they link to another study done in Portland: http://kellyjclifton.com/Research/Ec...es_Nov2012.pdf

I have also seen similar results in other studies in other areas, LA, SF, and perhaps even Denver. As well as London. It seems to hold up pretty well across lots of different areas.
 
Old 02-12-2014, 10:31 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,937,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post

Having lived both in the NE and the Midwest, I beg to differ. It feels colder in the Midwest. Plus so many of you post from the standpoint of singles or couples at most.
As a kid, especially as a teenager, I would rather walk than be in a car most of the time, even with bad weather. I remember some older adults having more an issue with walking (and we're not talking an athletic 1+ mile walk) than kids. Youngest kids are perhaps an exception.

As for the Northeast vs Midwest, it depends on where. Pittsburgh is milder than where I am. But is upstate NY, say the Finger Lakes much different from Illinois? Champaign averages slightly warmer overall than here (days are slightly cooler, nights a bit warmer though).
 
Old 02-12-2014, 10:32 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,937,844 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Probably because pedestrians shop at fewer stores or stay local more, so they shop more at each store, but less stores.
 
Old 02-12-2014, 10:41 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33058
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
As a kid, especially as a teenager, I would rather walk than be in a car most of the time, even with bad weather. I remember some older adults having more an issue with walking (and we're not talking an athletic 1+ mile walk) than kids. Youngest kids are perhaps an exception.

As for the Northeast vs Midwest, it depends on where. Pittsburgh is milder than where I am. But is upstate NY, say the Finger Lakes much different from Illinois? Champaign averages slightly warmer overall than here (days are slightly cooler, nights a bit warmer though).
Yes, upstate New York is different from the Midwest, especially the upper Midwest, say from Chicago north. It may not look that different on paper, but it feels much different.
 
Old 02-12-2014, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,655,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Probably because pedestrians shop at fewer stores or stay local more, so they shop more at each store, but less stores.
Perhaps. I guess the take away is, it depends on store type if it is beneficial. In my book, if it is the type of store people need to go to often, it is good to have foot traffic. (I.e. a grocery store with lots of repeat visitors gets good turnover of product.)

It also might surmise that pedestrians stop more ay "quick service" places in walking distance than their peers. So I'd rather have my coffee shop or bakery in a walkable place vs a drivable place.

So the pedestrians are "better" customers as they are more loyal and spend more dollars at your store.

Based on my own behavior. The coffee shops near my home are infinitely superior to the ones near work. But since I have to park and walk a few blocks to work, if I stop on the way to work, I am more likely to go to the spots near work, even though they suck vs drive and park at the good ones near my house and then drive to work.
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