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Old 02-15-2014, 08:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Basically going with destroying their city with freeways was the beginning of the end for Detroit.
But I would imagine that this excessive freeway construction was driven by the auto industry magnates in Detroit. Funny, who would have guessed that the instrument of the city's birth would also be the instrument of its death?
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Old 02-15-2014, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Michigan
4,571 posts, read 7,044,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Under that logic, Boston's lack of a grid and narrower streets should support less population. Even more so with London.
Not only that, but Detroit's inner-city grids are actually pretty irregular with varying block sides and a lot of it seemingly unplanned. The only part of the city that was predictably planned was the central downtown area and the outlying neighborhoods of the city. Everything else was sort of shoehorned in based on the sizes of the farms that were developed over. There were important parts that were planned, like the spoke-and-wheel radial roads, that actually funneled traffic into downtown pretty well but other than that, there was no less grand design than there would have been in any other typical Midwestern flat city.

I think Detroit's freeways are very well planned because they performed exactly what their intended purpose was which was to alleviate traffic from the major thoroughfares. Detroit's declining population had more to do with the city's other social issues than the building of the freeway system. The freeways certainly had an effect, but it's sort of like saying that rain makes a boat wet while it's sitting on a lake.
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Old 02-15-2014, 10:03 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,141 posts, read 9,925,452 times
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Default What are the best and worst examples of Urban Planning you can share?

Quote:
Originally Posted by demonta4 View Post
Anything from streetscapes to strip malls to urban havens.
Use pictures and Google Maps.
New York City.

Some examples of poor planning

- The filling in of Collect Pond (would have made a nice Downtown Park)
- The destruction of Pennsylvania Station and many other historic landmarks
- The route of the Cross Bronx Expressway could have taken a less destructive route
- Putting massive welfare housing projects in Coney Island and the Rockaways (what moron decided to put housing projects in resort areas???)
- welfare housing projects in Far Rockaway as far from the NYC job markets as one can possibly get
- Putting a huge housing project on top of Interstate 95 and also other terrible locations like steep hillsides or water
- lack of large park space in certain parts of the city, notably southern Brooklyn and northwestern Queens

Some examples of good planning

- Upper Manhattan - learning from mistakes from lower Manhattan, much more parks, streets often follow the hilly terrain
- Central Park & Prospect Park
- Bronx Park System & Staten Island Park System
- continued adaptive use of the historic New York City Hall (instead of tearing it down and building a monstrosity like Boston did)
- planned neighborhoods like Forest Hills Gardens, Sunnyside, Jackson Heights etc.
- the NYC subway system
- Richmond Town, Brooklyn Heights, Greenwich Village and other historical districts & landmarks
- Stone Street Manhattan
- Staten Island Bluebelt
- NYC water supply from the Catskills!
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Old 02-15-2014, 11:16 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
- Putting massive welfare housing projects in Coney Island and the Rockaways (what moron decided to put housing projects in resort areas???)
Robert Moses.

Last edited by nei; 02-15-2014 at 08:24 PM..
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Old 02-15-2014, 08:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
The grid network had nothing to do with the population. Which actually, your assertion makes no sense because the grid network extends into the suburbs.
The grid network supported 2 Million people just fine.

They built the freeways, ruined the downtown and moved everyone out to the suburbs.

Mission accomplished?
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Old 02-15-2014, 08:20 PM
 
3,836 posts, read 4,720,444 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
Not only that, but Detroit's inner-city grids are actually pretty irregular with varying block sides and a lot of it seemingly unplanned. The only part of the city that was predictably planned was the central downtown area and the outlying neighborhoods of the city. Everything else was sort of shoehorned in based on the sizes of the farms that were developed over. There were important parts that were planned, like the spoke-and-wheel radial roads, that actually funneled traffic into downtown pretty well but other than that, there was no less grand design than there would have been in any other typical Midwestern flat city.

I think Detroit's freeways are very well planned because they performed exactly what their intended purpose was which was to alleviate traffic from the major thoroughfares. Detroit's declining population had more to do with the city's other social issues than the building of the freeway system. The freeways certainly had an effect, but it's sort of like saying that rain makes a boat wet while it's sitting on a lake.
absolutely not true:



And the last part is unbelievable - the highways became the expressways for wealthy leaving the city. It was by far the worst decision ever made in a city know for making a lot of terrible decisions.
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Old 02-15-2014, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,573,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Komeht View Post
absolutely not true:



And the last part is unbelievable - the highways became the expressways for wealthy leaving the city. It was by far the worst decision ever made in a city know for making a lot of terrible decisions.
If Detroit had invested in a rail system instead and went light on the highways it might have faired much better in the present day.
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Old 02-15-2014, 08:53 PM
 
1,709 posts, read 1,678,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
If Detroit had invested in a rail system instead and went light on the highways it might have faired much better in the present day.
I don't think that would have been possible, to be honest. I'm sure that the car industry magnates were probably pushing hard for a heavily-developed freeway system. After all, the car industry was always the backbone of Detroit; and seeing as more and bigger roads=more cars=more sales, I would imagine the car industry had a hand in making sure the freeways were built, no matter the cost to the city.

Just a theory, but I wonder if anyone else thinks this?
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Old 02-15-2014, 08:59 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,058,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
If Detroit had invested in a rail system instead and went light on the highways it might have faired much better in the present day.
I suspect there were too many other factors that led to its decline.
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Old 02-15-2014, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Columbus, OH
381 posts, read 510,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
I don't think that would have been possible, to be honest. I'm sure that the car industry magnates were probably pushing hard for a heavily-developed freeway system. After all, the car industry was always the backbone of Detroit; and seeing as more and bigger roads=more cars=more sales, I would imagine the car industry had a hand in making sure the freeways were built, no matter the cost to the city.

Just a theory, but I wonder if anyone else thinks this?
No doubt. But was there ever an interurban rail or trolley system in Detroit prior to 1946?
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