U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-14-2014, 03:19 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,989,613 times
Reputation: 14810

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
Yeah but I'm sure every suburb has it's own downtown at least. A lack of great downtowns is why people complain about LA suburbia.

Even Redwood City, San Mateo, and Burlingame have their own downtowns. Is their any bay area suburb without a downtown?
I'd guess the East Bay suburbs south of Oakland (Fremont, Newark, Union City). They look rather decentralized and mostly strip malls on their commercial streets.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-14-2014, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
4,753 posts, read 12,326,705 times
Reputation: 3224
I figured it out by living in the suburbs and noticing how much time I end up driving to the city. So I should be living in the city. Which is where I'm planning to move.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2014, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,697 posts, read 23,672,920 times
Reputation: 35449
I grew up in a large city and moved to a small city. I have also lived in suburbs.

Since I don't drive, I always need things to be walking distance so rural areas were out for me. Good public transportation and being near a supermarket were must-haves. These are things I always needed but I found as I got older there were things I didn't need so much like being near activities in which I no longer participated that could only be found in a city.

So now that I am retired, I would say I am still a probably city person who still needs to be near necessities and some entertainment and it's usually a city that's going to have those things. However if I found a town or suburb that also met those needs, that would be fine too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2014, 05:32 PM
 
89 posts, read 79,595 times
Reputation: 489
I grew up in suburbs. The second suburb I lived in was more suburban than the first one, and I loved living in the second suburb. I associated it with class, as I think a lot of people do. And safety. I don't necessarily think it's a "Leave It To Beaver" thing. Because of this, I used to think I was a suburbs person.

I turned 18, went to college and I have moved every few years ever since then. I've lived in cities, small towns, back in the suburbs again and the one type of place you don't mention and a lot of people never think about--college towns. I would not equate college towns to anything you've described. To me, a college town is a place that predominantly revolves around the university and its students. It's almost like the university IS the town, even though there's other stuff there and not all of it is affiliated with the school or there to cash in on students.

Having lived every type of place, I now know I am a college town person because I think it has the best of all worlds. Because it's for the university and its students, everything you could want and need tends to be there. They've always had an escapist feel to me, like you've entered the world of that university and the real world doesn't exist. If you happen to love that university, bonus points--even more like an escape. They feel safe to me. They tend to be fun and have a lot of fun things to do, but they also have intellectual things to get involved in. And if the university is a great academic university and/or has a great sports program, you get that classist feel, as well.

A college town is actually the first place I lived after leaving home...then a small town, a city, then I went back home to the suburbs...then another college town, suburb, city and now the suburbs again. After living all these places, suburbs feel boring to me. Had I not lived all these places--let's say I lived in a city and suburbs--I'd likely still think I'm a suburbs person. It takes experience to truly know. See, now, I really want to get out of the suburbs and go back to the last college town I lived in (or maybe move to another one, but really I'd like to go back to Ann Arbor, Michigan, the last college town I lived in). On the opposite end of the spectrum is cities--absolutely not a city girl. Love to visit them, but living in them, I found, is too stressful and too costly (and I'm talking Level A cities, like LA, SF, NYC, Chicago, Miami...).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2014, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Chicago area
14,407 posts, read 7,929,570 times
Reputation: 53540
I love love love Chicago. The great restaurants, zoo, museums, beautiful architecture, and the beaches along Lake Michigan. It's a great place to visit if you need a change of pace and some fun things to do. I couldn't live there because of the congestion, gang bangers, beggars, and impossible expensive parking. We live 20 minutes from the loop but a world away. I can actually walk my dogs at midnight after work and feel totally safe. There's not much in the way of restaurants here but we did get a great couples message in town in a beautiful old Dutch colonial house. There are old houses and stained glass windows everywhere. We have a great place to get ice cream within walking distance but it's closed until March now. People are friendly and shops put out water bowls for the dogs. A tad like Mayberry I guess.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2014, 06:20 PM
 
7,968 posts, read 18,087,474 times
Reputation: 2597
I grew up in a fairly high-density suburb about a half-hour away from downtown. It was a nice place to grow up but by the time I turned 16, walking the mall and going to the movies wasn't cutting it. My friends and I started hanging out downtown and loved it. It was my goal to live in or close to downtown once I graduated college and I managed to do that for the rest of my time in my home area.

Today I live in what is technically a suburb but for all intents and purposes is an urban extension of the city. There's a variety of reasons that my wife and I don't live in the city proper, the most important being the expense and the convenience of her commute.

By the end of the decade, we will likely be moving someplace else due south: either to the heart of one city to enjoy its amenities or the suburbs of another city to be closer to her family. The more "practical" choice would be the latter although I personally think I would go stir-crazy; the fact that I find the amenities of this city proper to be somewhat generic doesn't help.

I suppose all of this is to say that I consider myself to be a "city person" but not to the point where I am willing (anymore) to pay an exorbitant amount to live in an interesting neighborhood. I have a greater appreciation these days for the suburbs where I grew up - it's certainly safe and a great place for families - but I still would not choose to live there. I've only raised four-legged kids - smaller ones, at that - and I don't have a particularly strong desire for a detached home. I'm also one of those "crazy" people that prefers riding mass transit to driving whenever possible.

Last edited by FindingZen; 02-14-2014 at 06:35 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2014, 07:34 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,013 posts, read 102,621,396 times
Reputation: 33082
I've done all three, plus lived in a rural area outside of a small town. Each seemed to fit at the time. I do think if you're looking for a sense of community and being able to get involved in your community, a suburb or a smaller city/town is more likely to give you that opportunity. Big cities are just too, well, big, IMO. However, I did enjoy my time there as a 20 something.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2014, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,238 posts, read 24,433,481 times
Reputation: 13010
I'm not sure I know for sure yet, but I do like elements of all three.

I have lived in:

-a suburban barrio in Corona, CA, built 1962 (which ironically had horse properties down the street)

-summers at my grandparents house in a middle class+ suburban area north of Seattle (built 1980s).

-suburban apartments in Riverside and Rancho Cucamonga, CA & Denver and Aurora, CO, all of which where built in the 1970s/80's with ample parking/pools/etc.

-a suburban neighborhood in a small CA town (25K pop, nothing within 75 miles in any direction but desert), built 1980s

-two different sets of apartments in the same small CA town (multiplex/duplex types)

-a house in a lower-middle class suburban neighborhood in Aurora, CO (built late 60's)

-a century old house on a dirt road in a quiet neighborhood on a bluff overlooking a small valley/natural park, less than 1 mile from downtown Spokane, WA (pop 208K). {this was really the best of all worlds....until my next move}.

I've never *lived* in a big city type situation. I have had several day stays in hotels in Chicago's Loop, Toronto's downtown, Denver, LA, the Magnolia neighborhood in Seattle proper (which most would classify as suburban). I have no desire to live somewhere like Chicago's Loop if given the choice. I think it's a great place, but I don't need all that excitement 24-7.

As you can see, it's mostly been some sort of suburb type situation for me throughout my life. Over the past few months, my wife and I have been on a house hunt all over metro Denver. We settled on a suburban house built in the early 60's, which sits in an inner-ring suburb, but is only 15 minutes (or 5 miles) from Downtown Denver, is within clear sight of the mountains, is convenient to all kinds of shopping/restaurants, and in 2 years there will be light rail stop less than a mile away, which would give us car-free access to downtown (if we chose).

I do know this: I like where I live to be established, convenient, not particularly dense, and with some sort of nature within sight.
__________________
Moderator for Los Angeles, The Inland Empire, and the Washington state forums.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2014, 08:49 PM
 
6,435 posts, read 9,959,958 times
Reputation: 8001
I grew up in Florida. Lived all around the state and the country. Lived in suburbs, big cities, mid and small sized towns. I'm a suburban person. I realized this when we moved to Texas and we rented a huge 2 story home in a nice suburban area. I'd never been so content in my life. I was very happy living there. The reason I love the suburbs so much is because it represents everything I was never able to have. Or at least keep. I always wanted to live in a nice house filled with lots of sunlight and happiness and warmth. I wanted a stable living, non-dysfunctional family, carefree childhood, and to live in a nice family oriented neighborhood like the ones I saw in tv shows and movies. I've had small glimmers of that in the past but not consistently. To this day, I still have that desire.

Last edited by allenk893; 02-14-2014 at 09:01 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2014, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,238 posts, read 24,433,481 times
Reputation: 13010
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenk893 View Post
I grew up in Florida. Lived all around the state and the country. Lived in suburbs, big cities, mid and small sized towns. I'm a suburban person. I realized this when we moved to Texas and we rented a huge 2 story home in a nice suburban area. I'd never been so content in my life. I was very happy living there. The reason I love the suburbs so much is because it represents everything I was never able to have. Or at least keep. I always wanted to live in a nice house filled with lots of sunlight and happiness and warmth. I wanted a stable living, non-dysfunctional family, carefree childhood, and to live in a nice family oriented neighborhood like the ones I saw in tv shows and movies. I've had small glimmers of that but never consistently. To this day, I still have that desire.
The area I grew up in had a lot of middle-class suburban envy. Like, if you lived in "that new neighborhood with all the big houses", you've made it.

I bought into it as a kid/teen, but once I became an adult my feelings changed, and what those types of neighborhoods/houses represented to me was something I no longer wanted to aspire to.

For lack of a better term, moving into a neighborhood like that would make me feel like I was selling out. I like more modesty and character.

Don't get me wrong, I have tons of friends and family that live like that, and I have nothing inherently against it (or them). It's just not for me.
__________________
Moderator for Los Angeles, The Inland Empire, and the Washington state forums.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top