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Old 02-14-2014, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Pac. NW
2,021 posts, read 1,521,621 times
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I favor big cities, hands down. Old architecture mixed in with newer skyscrapers, diverse population, and there is more privacy and anonymity in a bigger city. City dwellers may not be as open and neighborly, but smaller towns often times don't know the line between being neighborly and being intrusive.

Anyone who has walked the streets of NYC knows that you can go into a coffee shop and be in the same room with millionaire businessmen, homeless people and everything in between. It's an interesting setting for watching people. Much more interesting than a town where everyone has known each other since kindergarten.

Bigger cities have a sense of history and a vibe that a smaller town doesn't have. Smaller towns are stale and stagnant, cities are progressive.

Last edited by tommy64; 02-14-2014 at 10:35 PM.. Reason: cuz
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Old 02-14-2014, 11:44 PM
 
1,293 posts, read 948,212 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommy64 View Post
I favor big cities, hands down. Old architecture mixed in with newer skyscrapers, diverse population, and there is more privacy and anonymity in a bigger city. City dwellers may not be as open and neighborly, but smaller towns often times don't know the line between being neighborly and being intrusive.

Anyone who has walked the streets of NYC knows that you can go into a coffee shop and be in the same room with millionaire businessmen, homeless people and everything in between. It's an interesting setting for watching people. Much more interesting than a town where everyone has known each other since kindergarten.

Bigger cities have a sense of history and a vibe that a smaller town doesn't have. Smaller towns are stale and stagnant, cities are progressive.
Yes, yes, yes. There is no privacy in small places, you just can't be yourself in places where people are so bored that they watch every new face closely.
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Old 02-15-2014, 12:45 AM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,710,950 times
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I fit in the Suburbs.
Safe, clean, wide open spaces, plenty of privacy, the people were much more relaxed compared to people in big cities, nice sense of community, family oriented.
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Old 02-15-2014, 12:47 AM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,710,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommy64 View Post
Bigger cities have a sense of history and a vibe that a smaller town doesn't have. Smaller towns are stale and stagnant, cities are progressive.
Is this really necessary? Is it hard for city folks to love living in the city without disrespecting other communities?
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Old 02-15-2014, 06:35 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
I fit in the Suburbs.
Safe, clean, wide open spaces, plenty of privacy, the people were much more relaxed compared to people in big cities, nice sense of community, family oriented.
Weren't you posted differently a couple of years ago?
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Old 02-15-2014, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,895 posts, read 7,655,626 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommy64 View Post
Bigger cities have a sense of history and a vibe that a smaller town doesn't have. Smaller towns are stale and stagnant, cities are progressive.
I have to take issue with this part of your post, too. Especially, the bolded bits.

For example, the small town of Navarre, Ohio (where I have ancestral roots, and where some of my family still lives) has a great deal of history going back almost 200 years.

Also, one man's "stale and stagnant" is another man's stable and secure.
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Old 02-15-2014, 07:07 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,995 posts, read 102,568,112 times
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^^Agreed. My little town of Louisville has quite a bit of interesting labor history. Also, I've not seen any more "keeping up with the Joneses" in the suburbs than in the city. Sometimes, on this board, the city residents get all superior over their walkabliity, etc.
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Old 02-15-2014, 08:22 AM
 
1,153 posts, read 1,057,471 times
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I'm definitely a big city person, but I've spent most of my life living in either small cities or college towns. I don't drive, so it's essential that I position myself close enough to amenities such as nearby grocery stores and restaurants. I currently live in a suburb, but it's next door to my work and still within walking distance to what I need on a regular basis. I lived in a big city in college and absolutely loved having everything right outside my doorstep. It had a 99 walk score. I'd like to return to a neighborhood like that, but it's too expensive.

I hate stereotypical suburban living with the big house, big yard, white picket fence, and predominant car culture. That doesn't appeal to me at all. It just seems like more to maintain to me. I'd rather rent a studio apartment the rest of my life and not have to mow lawns, fix stuff, or shovel snow. Small towns obviously, as a non-driver, don't appeal to me either. Driving 40 minutes to go grocery shopping seems like such a waste of time and gas. Of course many small towns have grocery stores, but the prices are insane compared to what you might find in a chain grocery store in a suburb or city. I'd much rather be closer to the action. I like the energy of big cities and the loudness doesn't bother me at all. I've never felt unsafe anywhere I've lived or visited.
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Old 02-15-2014, 10:26 AM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,710,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Weren't you posted differently a couple of years ago?
Lol yea I thought I was cool and hip to live in the city.
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Old 02-15-2014, 12:54 PM
 
Location: The Netherlands
22 posts, read 29,897 times
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I grew up in a nice neighbourhood of a dutch middle size city. We had a hospital, public pool, choice of different type of schools, shopping. I never thought that I would live in a big city or a small village, it had everything I needed. But when I started to work, the most highprofile jobs in my workfield were in Amsterdam, so I lived there for 2 years after graduation. However, I found the love of my life and settled first in a bigger village and 7 years a go we moved to the countryside of a tiny village close to the German border. And now we are thinking about a relocation to Boca Raton, Florida. Life is what happens to you, when you're busy making other plans and home is where the heart is... both sayings are so thrue. So I consider myself flexibel.
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