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Old 02-15-2014, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,056 posts, read 16,063,174 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
^^Agreed. My little town of Louisville has quite a bit of interesting labor history. Also, I've not seen any more "keeping up with the Joneses" in the suburbs than in the city. Sometimes, on this board, the city residents get all superior over their walkabliity, etc.
I wish I could remember that article talking about how millenials replaced material possessions for neighborhood amenities (walkable, number of ethnic restaurants). It's absolutely keeping up with the Joneses, just a different one where it's more about the neighborhood you live in than the car you drive. Some places may not notice it as much, but it's very apparent in the Bay Area or Los Angeles, or even Seattle. Capitol Hill was ground zero for Joneses Warfare of Class Standing when I was there.
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Old 02-15-2014, 02:43 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,980 posts, read 102,527,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
I wish I could remember that article talking about how millenials replaced material possessions for neighborhood amenities (walkable, number of ethnic restaurants). It's absolutely keeping up with the Joneses, just a different one where it's more about the neighborhood you live in than the car you drive. Some places may not notice it as much, but it's very apparent in the Bay Area or Los Angeles, or even Seattle. Capitol Hill was ground zero for Joneses Warfare of Class Standing when I was there.
My millenial daughter and I were talking about this. In Colorado, it's also, how many 14ers have you climbed, how many double black diamonds have you skied., etc.
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Old 02-16-2014, 03:50 PM
 
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My social life and family life growing up in a small town was terrible. You are isolated. And being in a small town far away from a city is even worse. If you have abusive parents and bad parents you can't get help easily.

A lot of the suburbs I have seen are pretty much houses, shopping centers, schools, churches, and parks for young families. Most of the small towns I know are very similar. The difference is small towns are not near cities, have more open space and agricultural areas, and the houses have "more" character. I feel suburbs have more young people than small towns. At least suburbs have large community colleges and are usually near colleges where as most small towns have most of their young people leave unless there is a college town nearby.

Cities I feel have that too, but they also have more urban areas.

Last edited by the city; 02-16-2014 at 04:56 PM..
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Old 02-16-2014, 05:14 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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If you have any interest in getting involved in local government, it's much easier in a small city, some of which are suburbs. You're also closer to your local government in a smaller community.
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Old 02-16-2014, 11:42 PM
 
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I prefer a big city, but I could be happy in a suburb if it's close to a major metropolis, and if the urban and commuter rail systems are decent. Also, my suburb would have to have a train station or transit stop as applicable.
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Old 02-17-2014, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,164 posts, read 29,645,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
If you have any interest in getting involved in local government, it's much easier in a small city, some of which are suburbs. You're also closer to your local government in a smaller community.
The city I live in now is likely about the right size for me, but I disagree about the getting involved with local government part. I think getting involved in local government is easier than you think. You just need a "role model" to help you with your path.

I just joined the board of a local non-profit, that has a regional mission (around transit and affordable housing). Even though my "day job" has nothing to do with these topics, I met people in the organization at city meetings. I have another acquaintance who is really involved in SF politics, via his neighborhood association.

You can get involved in any sized city, if you want to. I think most people don't really want to make the time to get involved (or can't).
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Old 02-17-2014, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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For me, a mid-sized city is plenty. I want access to sufficient density for good transit and walkability. But a smaller area that isn't so congested so riding your bike around town isn't scary due to tons of congestion/traffic/too much bustle.

I do like having access to a larger city for additional amenities, but some small cities do have plenty of "stuff." I also like to be in a progressive city, one that is setting the trends or at the beginning of the trend curve. Not the end.

I grew up in the suburbs, in a big metro and a tourist area. The benefit of the burbs in the tourist area, was that there was more stuff to do than a similarly sized suburb that wasn't a tourist attraction. And the tourist stuff was well in my "interests" during the age I lived there (in your early and late teen years, having amusements parks, beaches, mini golf, arcades, water slides, and go carting places is pretty much ideal.)

But needing to have access to a car to get anywhere outside of your subdivision was pretty crappy. Even though technically, it was a short distance to get to the strip malls, there was no sidewalk, crosswalk or bike lane. And we were separated by a 4 lane highway (with 45 MPH traffic). But since there were no interstates or freeways, my parents were likely more comfortable with the idea of me driving in high school than otherwise (although I was very late to the drivers license party).

I think is we would have stayed in the Bay Area, I would have likely skipped driving for much longer. I did live in suburbia, but it was feasible to walk to the strip mall. And there was transit/light rail within a few blocks. But no one uses transit in the section I lived in. And still now. It isn't too popular.

What I realized was important to me, is having choice in how to get around. I don't only want to rely on a car. I didn't realize this completely till late in my teens. One summer I did a monthlong summer camp in Charleston, SC. And it was amazing, Charleston is pretty sprawling, but we were in the middle of the historic downtown. We didn't have access to cars, but everything we would want was in walking distance. On the way back from class I could stop and grab some coffee. I could walk to the grocery store to pick up snacks. I could walk to the record store. I could stop at the vintage boutique. Everything was in reach within a 15 minute walk. It was totally freeing. And that was my clue that walkability was really important to me.

By the time I got to college, I didn't bing a car because I thought it was a dumb idea. My suspicions were confirmed when my peers were getting weekly parking tickets. It was almost always faster to walk, when you factored in the time to park, since it was so constrained. This taught me "urban parking philosophy," park in the first spot you see, and just walk further instead of circling the block. (I went to an "urban" campus, it wasn't a big city, but it functions like a city since parking is constrained and they discourage car use. It is generally easier not to drive in my college town.

I do this now, and my passengers are ready to kill me. Inevitably, there is a closer spot along the way, but I'd rather not spend 20 minutes looking for parking. If parking is constrained, I take another mode of transportation. I calculate the cost/time of parking for every trip and choose not to drive if it makes more sense.

I could easily live in a "hip" streetcar suburb or mid-sized city, as long as my neighborhood is walkable and connected to transit and bike lanes.
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Old 02-17-2014, 07:04 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,980 posts, read 102,527,356 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
The city I live in now is likely about the right size for me, but I disagree about the getting involved with local government part. I think getting involved in local government is easier than you think. You just need a "role model" to help you with your path.

I just joined the board of a local non-profit, that has a regional mission (around transit and affordable housing). Even though my "day job" has nothing to do with these topics, I met people in the organization at city meetings. I have another acquaintance who is really involved in SF politics, via his neighborhood association.

You can get involved in any sized city, if you want to. I think most people don't really want to make the time to get involved (or can't).
Perhaps. But. . . my city has 1 city councilperson for every 3333 people. Denver has 1 councilperson for every 45,000 people. Here, if you don't know your coucilperson/mayor personally, one of your friends does. Here, the candidates themselves campaign door to door. When the present mayor was running for office, he asked me where I worked. When I told him which pediatrics office, he told me he took his kids there. He was in high school with my boss. You're not likely to get that kind of stuff in Denver, or any big city. "The party" is more important in larger cities, even those like Denver that don't have a machine. In years past, I was very active in city recreation policy, and I was just a "gymnastics mom". In a larger city, there's more of a bureaucracy.
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Old 02-17-2014, 07:34 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,921,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Perhaps. But. . . my city has 1 city councilperson for every 3333 people. Denver has 1 councilperson for every 45,000 people.
The suburban town I grew up in, had one councilperson for every 50,000 people
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Old 02-17-2014, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Southern California
15,087 posts, read 17,554,290 times
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Originally Posted by the city View Post
What was the experience or experiences that made you that way. I am looking at a more sociological point.

I know many people from the 60s and 70s who grew up in the early suburbs still like the suburbs today. I think family life has a big part of which one you like.

Many kids with the "leave it to beaver" life had a positive view of suburbs and want to return to that life. Others who had it hard want to be in cities because they feel more expected.

Small towns I feel are ones who want to escape cities and suburbs. It may also be an escape from the suburbs, but instead of finding people for acceptance you go somewhere to get away period from people. Suburbs are good for some because of the safety and quietness and protection if one grew up living in a poor urban part of a city.
I'm all of them. But since I can't be at all three types of places at once, I chose to live in the suburbs because I work in one and it is inexpensive (relatively speaking). I'm within driving distance of the urban core of Los Angeles so not being 'in' the city is not an issue. I like small towns but moving to one would probably take me too far from work and my family.

[a compromise]
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