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Old 02-17-2014, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Too much pressure in cities, so no.

Too much isolation in small towns, no again.

A suburb feels about right.
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Old 02-17-2014, 11:48 PM
 
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I think Europe and the east has it a bit more right. In Australia, it's rare to see a university outside a major city. Most of the population in Australia is within an hour of a major city. The norm for some college kids is a 30 min-1hr commute to your college. Here if you live far from college you are considered a social outcast.

Chico, Santa Barbara, and San Luis Obispo I think are the only large colleges more than hour from a major city.
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Old 02-18-2014, 02:22 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post

Chico, Santa Barbara, and San Luis Obispo I think are the only large colleges more than hour from a major city.
Penn State? Texas A&M? Florida?
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Old 02-18-2014, 10:09 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
Penn State? Texas A&M? Florida?
Add U of Illinois.
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Old 02-18-2014, 11:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
Penn State? Texas A&M? Florida?
sry meant in CA
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Old 02-18-2014, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Perhaps. But. . . my city has 1 city councilperson for every 3333 people. Denver has 1 councilperson for every 45,000 people. Here, if you don't know your coucilperson/mayor personally, one of your friends does. Here, the candidates themselves campaign door to door. When the present mayor was running for office, he asked me where I worked. When I told him which pediatrics office, he told me he took his kids there. He was in high school with my boss. You're not likely to get that kind of stuff in Denver, or any big city.
I used to hang out at the local watering hole with the council members, city administration, etc. when I lived in a small (pop. 15,000) town. After I moved to the Big City, I found it difficult to make an informed vote for council because I hadn't been drinking with any of the candidates. LOL

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Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
Penn State? Texas A&M? Florida?
Ohio State.
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Old 02-18-2014, 08:15 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I used to hang out at the local watering hole with the council members, city administration, etc. when I lived in a small (pop. 15,000) town. After I moved to the Big City, I found it difficult to make an informed vote for council because I hadn't been drinking with any of the candidates. LOL
So did you support the best candidate to have a beer with?
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Old 02-19-2014, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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It's hard for me to pinpoint exactly when I became a city person, but I'll try.

I am, more or less, a second-generation suburbanite by birth. Both my parents grew up in Levittown, PA. My mother's family was from Philly, and she only moved there when she was five - spending a fair amount of time back in the city in her childhood. My father's father actually worked for Levitt building the houses themselves - he was a plumber, and after helping to build houses in Levittown, NY (where they initially lived until my dad was around five), he moved down to PA with his family to help build out that site.

My parents lived in various suburbs in Bucks County until I was three, when they moved to Connecticut. We spent around four years in a rather conventional mini-subdivision, and then moved to another town and another bigger house. My parents liked suburbs at that time, but they also liked old houses, so they were happy to get one from the 1930s with intact woodwork and the like. I lived there from second grade until the end of high school.

Once I became older (around ten) I started really disliking certain aspects of suburban life. First, we had a pretty big lot (half acre, although it was a long and narrow property) which meant I had a lot of snow shoveling, leaf raking, and lawn mowing to do. The mowing was the worst, due to the grass allergies I have. The other aspect was how residential my town was. The town was originally rural, and when it became denser in the 1950s, they purposefully set it up so that all non-residential development was along the outskirts of the town, and we lived in the middle. There was a convenience store around a 10-minute walk from our house, but there were no sidewalks, and the road had high speed limits for a residential street (at least 35 MPH IIRC), so it wasn't a fun walk. If I walked another 10 minutes, I could get to the library, but again, it wasn't a pleasant walk, so I seldom did so.

My mother decided I wasn't "mature enough" to drive when I was 16, so I didn't get the freedom of a car in my teenage years. I didn't actually learn how to drive until I was 19. So throughout high school I had to bum rides off of my friends to get places. Mostly I stayed cooped up in my house however. Given I did grow up outside of NYC, however, my friends and I used to go to shows in New York pretty frequently, taking Metro North back home again, which may have caused an early affection for New York City to form. By the end of high school, I was pretty sure that I wanted to ultimately end up in a city, but I didn't know where it would be.

I did not go to college in an urban area, but a small college town in Western Massachusetts. That said, in some ways, I got used to living in a non-autocentric environment. The campus was not ideally set up for walking, but I did walk, and quite a lot. Most freshmen gain ten pounds, I lost fifteen. My second and fourth years I had a car, but my permit was for a lot so remote from my dorm that it took around twenty minutes to walk there, so I never used the car unless I was visiting home or going to Boston to see a concert/hang out with friends. I got used to taking public buses as well (I initially had a weird fear of them, because I had never been on one and didn't know what to do). My junior year I spent abroad in England, where no one I knew drove, and my car collected dust at my mom's house.

I got a masters degree in the same place as I did my undergrad. The first year, I lived pretty far off campus, in a "garden apartment" complex. I had a car, but I didn't have a commuter permit for campus, so I used the bus to commute. I got sick of the commute, however. The summer between semesters, my car broke down, and I went carless for the second year, picking up bike riding at 23 for the first time since childhood and enjoying it immensely.

After graduation, I took a job in DC. Or rather, I took a job in suburban Maryland, but I was sure that I didn't want to live in Prince Georges county, so I lived in Capitol Hill and did a reverse commute. I had no need for my car besides for work, as I could do all of my grocery shopping either on a bike or the Red Line. I loved it. I think this was the point that city live was cinched for me, and I was set that wherever I lived, there needed to be transit access and good walkability. I've moved around a few times since, but I've broadly kept to similar neighborhoods.
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Old 02-19-2014, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
So did you support the best candidate to have a beer with?
I supported the ones who bought me a beer.
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Old 02-20-2014, 12:30 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,372 posts, read 21,218,356 times
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When I left my suburban life in Rochester, MN, and moved to Minneapolis, back in the early 70's, the cheapest housing was to be found in the inner city, close to downtown. With little income, there was little choice back then, couldn't afford an apt. in the suburbs. Today, due to gentrification, it's the opposite!

And? I lived in the inner city so long, living without a car, I've never outgrown it!
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