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Old 02-20-2014, 01:28 AM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,649,546 times
Reputation: 3625

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I grew up in Phoenix suburbia. I lived in different types, from a brand-new exurb area to the slightly higher density 70s homes. Spent all my life in it. Granted Phoenix is all suburbia, it's hard to know what anything else is like, especially for the US when you've only really seen San Diego and LA, which are both sprawled out too.

I remember when I took a trip to NYC for a week in 7th grade and almost had a heart attack because I had no idea what I was seeing. I saw pictures, don't get me wrong, but NYC is a lot different in person than in pictures. NYC I think looks smaller in pictures than it does in person. The apartments I'm used to seeing in Phoenix are garden-style which are low-density, usually three stories high with a lot of parking and some form of courtyard in the middle. Such things don't exist in NYC. Practically alien. NYC was like the antonym where I came from. Everyone walked, took subways or used taxis. No one had a personal car, or back yard. Most didn't even have private outdoor space. Stores were BELOW you, not a mile away. That affected me, but not a lot.

I recently came to college and wasn't able to take my car. I was worried I wasn't going to be able to do anything because Tucson is frankly pretty bland and is just as sprawled out as Phoenix. I realized after a couple months being here that it wasn't bad. I could walk to all of my classes, walk to the stores, and take taxis and split fare with my friends if I really needed to leave, which rarely happens. All of my friends are also walking distance. And I thought I would never think this, but I actually like not having a car. The public bus system in Tucson is pretty scary, so I don't take it, but I take the CatTran when I need to go to the other end of campus and I love doing that.

My goal is to live in the inner city when I'm out of college. Inner city of... Any bigger city. Just with things close by. I've never experienced this luxury and frankly I feel like I've been missing out. I love it a lot.
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Old 02-20-2014, 08:52 AM
 
3,492 posts, read 4,961,066 times
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I grew up in a suburb. I moved into a downtown city (with my wife) for college. Then I moved to what I consider a big town/small city (60k) for my wife's college. By the end of that time, we had assessed what we liked and didn't like about each place. We decided that we wanted a big house in a quiet area, among other things. Our negative experience with the noise, crime rates, and traffic downtown convinced us we did not want that. The small city (60k) also had a mid size city (150k) north of it. We noticed that the small city had big city traffic, but the mid-size city had no traffic problems, because it had vastly more roads. Instead of 1-2 lanes they were 3 to 5 lanes. Instead of everything being built on top of each other, things were spread around the city so we could go to the place we wanted, and the other driver would be going to a different place.

Then we knew we wanted to be in the suburbs of a city with sufficient roads to prevent severe traffic problems. We knew small city wasn't for us, because the job market was too nepotism based.

Note: We are not social people, and we thoroughly dislike crime. In case you're wondering, the downtown that convinced us we didn't want to live in a downtown was Portland, OR. I know people that loved the downtown there, but it wasn't right for us. I study a great deal, many hours a day, and can go 2 or 3 days without leaving my property and not even notice it. It's a very nice, large house, on a reasonable lot. I'm close enough to the city that I can reach Sam's club in 12 minutes, but it is very very quiet, and I love that.
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Old 02-20-2014, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,544,210 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lurtsman View Post
I grew up in a suburb. I moved into a downtown city (with my wife) for college. Then I moved to what I consider a big town/small city (60k) for my wife's college. By the end of that time, we had assessed what we liked and didn't like about each place. We decided that we wanted a big house in a quiet area, among other things. Our negative experience with the noise, crime rates, and traffic downtown convinced us we did not want that. The small city (60k) also had a mid size city (150k) north of it. We noticed that the small city had big city traffic, but the mid-size city had no traffic problems, because it had vastly more roads. Instead of 1-2 lanes they were 3 to 5 lanes. Instead of everything being built on top of each other, things were spread around the city so we could go to the place we wanted, and the other driver would be going to a different place.

Then we knew we wanted to be in the suburbs of a city with sufficient roads to prevent severe traffic problems. We knew small city wasn't for us, because the job market was too nepotism based.

Note: We are not social people, and we thoroughly dislike crime. In case you're wondering, the downtown that convinced us we didn't want to live in a downtown was Portland, OR. I know people that loved the downtown there, but it wasn't right for us. I study a great deal, many hours a day, and can go 2 or 3 days without leaving my property and not even notice it. It's a very nice, large house, on a reasonable lot. I'm close enough to the city that I can reach Sam's club in 12 minutes, but it is very very quiet, and I love that.
Downtown Portland is great when you are single, I loved it there, but being older, married, and wanting to have a kid, we will be looking into one of the many neighborhoods in Portland. My wife loves North Portland and I want to live where I can easily bike to work if I want to, so we will see where it lands us when we move back.

But even in the suburbs of Portland or even the countryside just past the UGB you really can't go wrong.
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Old 02-22-2014, 11:08 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,897,711 times
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Also living in the burbs means longer commutes to work and that can mean getting up earlier. I prefer to be as close to work so I can sleep in more. Both my aunts have husbands who have 30-45 min commutes to work. My uncle and wife who lives in LA has the same type of commute even though he is closer to work because traffic is bad.
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Old 02-23-2014, 02:08 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,692,971 times
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It might be interesting to note a little bit more about preferences. I have a very big preference for walkable and transit/bike friendly areas. But I have been asking myself why I don't have any desire to move close to work, because the blocks within a mike of my office would do pretty well on the walkable scale, and are improving on the the transit and bike scale. And then I realized the 3rd important factor. I'd rather live in a larger metro and a city, because I like having early access to trends. In my metro, the only places with the "trends" are San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley. All of the other places are way behind. Cocktail bars, 3rd wave coffee, interesting restaurants, fast food made with local ingredients....whatever these things are, they take a whole to branch into the other cities or suburbs. And I like to be on the bleeding edge.
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Old 02-23-2014, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,391 posts, read 59,880,407 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
Also living in the burbs means longer commutes to work and that can mean getting up earlier.
Unless you work in the suburbs ... which many people do.
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Old 02-23-2014, 01:49 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,897,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Unless you work in the suburbs ... which many people do.
yeah, but most suburbs have jobs in the service sector. hospitals, doctors, retail, local governments, etc...Palo Alto, Berkeley, Menlo Park, Redwood City, and some suburbs of LA are the only exceptions I know.
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Old 02-23-2014, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,649,546 times
Reputation: 3625
Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
yeah, but most suburbs have jobs in the service sector. hospitals, doctors, retail, local governments, etc...Palo Alto, Berkeley, Menlo Park, Redwood City, and some suburbs of LA are the only exceptions I know.
Lots of corporate jobs in Phoenix aren't in Downtown. Petsmart is by the loop 101 and I-17 in north Phoenix, almost on the other side of town. There are a few more in neighboring Tempe, which can have an arguably long commute from the Downtown area in rush hour time, and in Scottsdale as well.
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Old 02-23-2014, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,391 posts, read 59,880,407 times
Reputation: 54036
Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
yeah, but most suburbs have jobs in the service sector. hospitals, doctors, retail, local governments, etc...Palo Alto, Berkeley, Menlo Park, Redwood City, and some suburbs of LA are the only exceptions I know.
You need to get out more. Ever heard of an industrial park?
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Old 02-23-2014, 04:49 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,726,844 times
Reputation: 9029
Quote:
Originally Posted by :-D View Post
Lots of corporate jobs in Phoenix aren't in Downtown. Petsmart is by the loop 101 and I-17 in north Phoenix, almost on the other side of town. There are a few more in neighboring Tempe, which can have an arguably long commute from the Downtown area in rush hour time, and in Scottsdale as well.
True.
It's the same in the Twin Cities. 3M and Best Buy headquarters are located in the suburbs.
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