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Old 07-07-2014, 08:31 AM
 
56,701 posts, read 81,017,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
My daughter is turning five in a month. They start the magnet system at Kindergarten here. Actually, they have a Montessori school you can get into at age 3, but it has a limited number of slots. We tried to get her in (if only to save on two years of day care costs) and got wait-listed.

In Pittsburgh, nearly all of the magnets are by lottery, but you must apply. Historically there were racial quotas - they were set up to be balanced racially, being 50% black and 50% white/other - but the Supreme Court overturned this. They now use economic quotas to try to balance the number of working class and middle class students.

You can get kicked out of the magnet system after too many unexplained absences, suspensions, or (starting in middle school) having too low of a GPA (below 2.5, IIRC). But otherwise, once you're in the system, you're there for good.

The arts high school (which now has a middle school as well) is the one school with its own admission process. You have to apply via audition to a particular program. Perhaps not coincidentally, it's also the whitest of the magnet schools (57% white, 32% black, 7% multiracial, 3% Asian, and 2% Hispanic), the least poor (only 38% free/reduced lunch), and the most prestigious (it's actually held in such regards, some suburban parents pay tuition costs - over $10,000 per year - to send their kids there).
I'm not surprised by the last statement in the post, as I remember seeing a special about how suburban parents would try to get their children into an arts high school in Philadelphia. Arts high schools seem to be the urban schools that get a nice balance of diversity and interest from a wide range of families. For instance, School of the Arts in Rochester, NY, a 7-12 grade school, seems to be the best public high school in that city academically and has the highest percentage of White students out of any public HS in that city. These are the school demographics: 2013 | SCHOOL OF THE ARTS - Enrollment Data | New York State Education Department Data Site

2013 | SCHOOL OF THE ARTS - Report Card | New York State Education Department Data Site

School of the Arts / Overview
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Old 07-09-2014, 03:31 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,991 posts, read 42,018,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
If you are in an environment of multi-generational poverty, and the people around you take two steps back for every step forward... well it is a lot harder. Particularly when you factor in systemic racism and bias.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
jade408 gave a good explanation of the immigrant issue; there's no need to say more.
Inner city hispanics usually fall into the immigrant category. If we're looking at NYC schools (as eschaton used as an example), a lot of the black population (maybe 40% )* is immigrant and part of the Puerto Rican population might count as well in the multi-generational poverty (definitely for the area I live in, most of the inner city poor are Puerto Rican). I would assume that in NYC magnet schools the few blacks are of immigrant origin. Similarly, in top colleges.

*The Canarsie neighborhood argued about in the other thread as an example of "white flight" where the population switched from white to black is about 50% foreign born according to CityData.
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Old 07-09-2014, 06:28 PM
 
Location: plano
6,579 posts, read 8,114,719 times
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Train and density lovers bash the suburbs claiming the cities are an efficient solution while their schools stick and cost of living their sticks as well. Show me one city with lower coat and decent, not good but decent schools, otherwise drop your arguments that make no sense
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Old 07-09-2014, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,550,732 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
Train and density lovers bash the suburbs claiming the cities are an efficient solution while their schools stick and cost of living their sticks as well. Show me one city with lower coat and decent, not good but decent schools, otherwise drop your arguments that make no sense
What?
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Old 07-09-2014, 07:12 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,663,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Inner city hispanics usually fall into the immigrant category. If we're looking at NYC schools (as eschaton used as an example), a lot of the black population (maybe 40% )* is immigrant and part of the Puerto Rican population might count as well in the multi-generational poverty (definitely for the area I live in, most of the inner city poor are Puerto Rican). I would assume that in NYC magnet schools the few blacks are of immigrant origin. Similarly, in top colleges.

*The Canarsie neighborhood argued about in the other thread as an example of "white flight" where the population switched from white to black is about 50% foreign born according to CityData.
Only 17% of Denver's total population is foreign-born, about half that from Mexico. I posted a link about that yesterday on another forum, I don't remember which one. You could do a search to verify.
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Old 07-09-2014, 07:15 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,991 posts, read 42,018,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Only 17% of Denver's total population is foreign-born, about half that from Mexico. I posted a link about that yesterday on another forum, I don't remember which one. You could do a search to verify.
I wasn't saying anything about Denver specifically. However, I think it's true that most Hispanics in this country are either foreign born or have a foreign born parent, with Puerto Ricans an ambitious case, and some are more multi-generational as I said.
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Old 07-09-2014, 07:29 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,663,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I wasn't saying anything about Denver specifically. However, I think it's true that most Hispanics in this country are either foreign born or have a foreign born parent, with Puerto Ricans an ambitious case, and some are more multi-generational as I said.
No you said inner city Hispanics are "usually" immigrants with no other qualifiers. There are many Hispanic families that have been in CO for generations.
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Old 07-09-2014, 08:03 PM
 
56,701 posts, read 81,017,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnhw2 View Post
Train and density lovers bash the suburbs claiming the cities are an efficient solution while their schools stick and cost of living their sticks as well. Show me one city with lower coat and decent, not good but decent schools, otherwise drop your arguments that make no sense
There are actually smaller, but legitimately urban cities that fit. Many college towns to mind as well.
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Old 07-10-2014, 08:21 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,353,954 times
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http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/15/bu...able.html?_r=0
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Old 07-10-2014, 08:36 PM
 
56,701 posts, read 81,017,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
This will depend on the city as well.
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