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Old 07-15-2014, 01:15 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,967,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Getting your car hit is the only thing on your list I think someone needs to be legitimately concerned about. And even the risk of that happening is low. The biggest thing for me is getting my bumper scratched up from parking. But that's not that big of a deal to me. It's to be expected in the city to an extent.

Parking can be difficult in very dense, trendy neighbors, but not all neighborhoods. I often get asked "But will I be able to park in your neighborhood???" as if finding a parking space will be like driving to the Macy's Day Parade.
For very dense places, I think takes some practice. I don't parallel park often enough to it get it right on the first try every time, and I have trouble with tight spaces and a bad sense of what can fit my car. Someone in the neighborhood also gets a good sense of where empty spaces are likely to be. As for a bumper getting scratched, my car is getting to beater stage at this point so I don't care all that much. If I had a new car I'd be a bit wary, or at least invest in one of the bumper guards common in the city. Parking you car during a vacation sounds a huge hassle, but I suppose you can figure out a way. And late at night, I'd imagine it could turn into some horrible version of musical cars, where every single space is taken and you need find the person leaving.

Another concern I heard from city street parking is that my car would be torn shreds or stolen. My parents seemed to have a bit of that fear, but more was from a friend who I told I'd be street parking in Washington Heights. He must have thought it was still 1990...
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Old 07-15-2014, 01:18 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33064
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Getting your car hit is the only thing on your list I think someone needs to be legitimately concerned about. And even the risk of that happening is low. The biggest thing for me is getting my bumper scratched up from parking. But that's not that big of a deal to me. It's to be expected in the city to an extent.

Parking can be difficult in very dense, trendy neighbors, but not all neighborhoods. I often get asked "But will I be able to park in your neighborhood???" as if finding a parking space will be like driving to the Macy's Day Parade.
I suggest making a comparison of insurance rates for on-street vs off-street parking facilities.
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Old 07-15-2014, 01:24 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,967,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I suggest making a comparison of insurance rates for on-street vs off-street parking facilities.
He may have, my guess it's the added cost is still cheaper than an off street parking space (in Brooklyn). If you have an old car with just collision insurance, it shouldn't make a difference.
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Old 07-15-2014, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I suggest making a comparison of insurance rates for on-street vs off-street parking facilities.
The odds of having your car hit are still low. I don't see many parked cars getting rammed into. I mean, when you go to a big box store in the suburbs, do you see many people ramming into parked cars there? It happens, of course, but it's not that common a thing.

My insurance is probably lower because I drive less.
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Old 07-15-2014, 01:54 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
The odds of having your car hit are still low. I don't see many parked cars getting rammed into. I mean, when you go to a big box store in the suburbs, do you see many people ramming into parked cars there? It happens, of course, but it's not that common a thing.

My insurance is probably lower because I drive less.
I did a Google search and here is the first thing I found:

Quote:
Originally Posted by mellybear View Post
This is the second time in a year that my car was hit while parked on the street. Last summer I had bought a pre-owned and within six months it got hit on the fender. This summer of Aug. 2010, my NEW car that's only 8 months old got hit on the left passenger door. I thought that by parking the car in a quiet residential neighborhood my car would be "safe". Well, I guess it doesn't matter now where you park. I want to say it was someone coming out of their driveway. I was parked across from an active driveway where commercial vans sit. The block where I park is a 2-way street and it's pretty narrow. So if Joe Blow was coming out of his driveway and had to go around another parked car to turn right, he most likely hit my car. That's the only thing I can think of given how the damage on my car looks. There's no paint or rubber, so I'm guessing it got hit by metal, again commercial van comes to mind. I tried checking to see if there were any cars with damage, but no luck. If the person who hit me parks in their driveway, it will be hard for me to check. I did ring the bell of the house where I parked my car in front of to see if they saw or heard anything, but no one answered. Anyways, my Insurance company must think I do this on purpose! What are the chances of me getting hit twice?!! Private parking in my complex is too $$ and even the neighbors who rent out spots charge up the a$$ too! I don't know what to do. The car will get fixed, it's just the money I need to shell out for the deductible and the worry of getting hit again! I'm beginning to think that either someone goes around hitting cars in my area or I'm a target! I wish I can get a hold of some statistics/data from my area (Castle Hill section of the Bronx on Hermany Ave.) to see how many incidents like this happen yearly. Anyone know of such information?
Here is another article, Utah-centric, but still good info:
Statistics on Hit and Run Collisions in Salt Lake City | Utah Personal Injury Attorney | Salt Lake City Personal Injury Law

Another:
Facts About Hit and Run Accidents That May Shock You
**Nationally, 11 of every 100 traffic accidents are a hit and run.....**
All About Hit and Run Car Accidents
**In fact, statistics indicate that approximately 11% of all vehicle accidents in the United States are hit-and-run. And in Los Angeles, nearly half of all crashes involve drivers who flee the scene of the accident. . . . The most common hit-and-run type accident is when a driver hits a parked car usually when it is not occupied.**
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Old 07-15-2014, 02:02 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,967,271 times
Reputation: 14805
For a street parked car, it's rather hard for your car to get hit badly unless there's a lot of empty space behind it (as in more than one or two empty car spaces but either a very big gap or being the first car on the street). I suppose you could get hit on the side, but it sounds rather hard. The easiest way for your street parked car to get hit is when another driver is parking in front or behind your car, these bumps are at really low speeds with minimal damage. Something like this is a common solution:

http://www.bumperarmor.com/Bumper-Pr...ector-Gold.jpg
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Old 07-15-2014, 02:09 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Someone hit the left front (driver's side) bumper/grill of my daughter's car. I don't know how it happened, nor does she.
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Old 07-15-2014, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,242,183 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I did a Google search and here is the first thing I found:



Here is another article, Utah-centric, but still good info:
Statistics on Hit and Run Collisions in Salt Lake City | Utah Personal Injury Attorney | Salt Lake City Personal Injury Law

Another:
Facts About Hit and Run Accidents That May Shock You
**Nationally, 11 of every 100 traffic accidents are a hit and run.....**
All About Hit and Run Car Accidents
**In fact, statistics indicate that approximately 11% of all vehicle accidents in the United States are hit-and-run. And in Los Angeles, nearly half of all crashes involve drivers who flee the scene of the accident. . . . The most common hit-and-run type accident is when a driver hits a parked car usually when it is not occupied.**
That only proves that it happens, which no one has denied. A lot of other things happen in New York City like guys getting gunned down in the street. Statistically, as a black male, I have a higher likelihood of being gunned down or incarcerated than other posters in this forum. But that doesn't mean that the odds of me getting gunned down or incarcerated still aren't low. I don't leave my house in the morning wondering if today is the day I'll get taken out in a hail of gunfire.

Likewise, I'm not all that concerned about someone crashing into my car. I spend very little time thinking about that.
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Old 07-16-2014, 12:18 AM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,955,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I'm not sure if that's a function of suburban life or not. The play date, to my knowledge, is something that's relatively new. I have friends in Manhattan and DC who set up play dates. Back in the old days, kids just went out and played...it didn't matter whether you grew up in New York or a small town in Mississippi. That's a cultural change, imo. Childhood today seems much more structured to me. When I was a kid, we weren't loaded up with tons of activities (camp, then karate, then fencing, then piano lessons, then...).
Maybe I was vague - empty playgrounds in decent urban neighborhoods aren't something that's common. It's quite common in the suburbs and it's been like that since I was a kid a long time ago - back when we were running amok at 7 or 8 years old.

Anyway, my youngest is too young (under 5) to cross the street by herself safely let alone walk 4 blocks to the park by herself. My eldest is getting to be around the age where he will start going by himself (or at least with his friends) . . . but the playground is full of kids aged 10-12 who are there without parents. It's just not a big deal and when my kids are that age they'll also be there without me. I just never had to make an appointment to meet people at the playground before. I might text people to let them know I was heading over but I was still going either way because I could guarantee that other kids would be there.


Quote:
I thought living in the city with 6 people in our family was a real challenge. I would prefer to have a free-standing home.
I don't get it - you think a 2000 s/f home is small?
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Old 07-16-2014, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,242,183 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
Maybe I was vague - empty playgrounds in decent urban neighborhoods aren't something that's common. It's quite common in the suburbs and it's been like that since I was a kid a long time ago - back when we were running amok at 7 or 8 years old.
I still wouldn't attribute that to suburban living. I would attribute that to the people in your neighborhood. If you go to many subdivisions in Prince George's County, MD, the playgrounds aren't empty.

Urban form, imo, doesn't have as much impact on kids' interaction with other kids as one might think. For example, my dad grew up in a town not too far away from this one.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=North...13.05,,0,-0.11

We would take our bikes there during the summer and ride around with other kids who lived two, sometimes three miles away. Backyard basketball, football, baseball, playing in woods, catching fireflies, eating honeysuckle and muscadines, etc. The distance wasn't really that much of a barrier. There was really no crime to speak of so our grandparents didn't mind us riding our bikes over long distances.

Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
I don't get it - you think a 2000 s/f home is small?
I don't think our house was even that large (unless you include our basement, which is unfinished). Our house was definitely small for four kids who weren't that far apart in age. We had one full bathroom in our house. And we had very little storage space. I shared a room with my older brother until he left for college, which would have been cool if we both didn't have a bunch of stuff. With instruments, stereo equipment, rollerblades, etc. our room was tight as hell. That's part of the reason he opted for brand new construction in the Atlanta suburbs.
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