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Old 07-17-2014, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,720,175 times
Reputation: 26676

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
This discussion has gotten out of hand. I am not advocating buying a house with an extra bedroom just for guests, that is unused 95% of the time. I'm not going to repeat what I've already said, as that will lead to accusations of that cardinal sin, being "defensive". I do think it's nice to be able to accomodate guests, even if on a pull out couch in your living room.

Fine, fine, fine. My point wasn't the !*%^Y&^ printer. It was about having some room for activities other than eating, sleeping and recreating (watching TV, reading, etc) in one's home. My millenial kids set up one of their bedrooms as an "office". Where do you guys keep receipts and other business papers? Not in the kitchen cupboards or the bedroom closets, I doubt. Where do you keep the sewing machine, the iron, whatever?
I've probably got one of the smaller living spaces here on the forum. I live in a studio apartment! I've got a big closet that takes up my hallway for clothing and all the clothes related stuff goes there (irons/ironing board/detergent). I don't have a sewing machine. One of my friends also lives in a studio. Hers is bigger and she is crafty. She has a big extra closet that she has setup as the craft room! I have a higher bed, so that is my secret storage place, so I have a file crate under there to keep all that stuff. I have a laptop that moves from my kitchen table to my desk.

I don't stockpile toilet paper or paper towels, so I buy the small packs so they are easy to store in my pantry/linen closet cabinet.

After like 10 years it is getting too stuffed, so in the next few weeks it is time for a huge closet clean out and some other "big cleaning" items! I don't have a patio or outdoor space, but there is storage cabinet above my parking spot, and I put the weird things I don't need often there.

Most other stuff goes under one of the beds!
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Old 07-18-2014, 07:43 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,058,839 times
Reputation: 14811
This got turned into the "lifestyle forum" for a bit, maybe these two posts will help it get on track:

Old Urbanist: Households v. Bedrooms

How common larger units are in various cities.

Two dense housing types in the same city, different unit size distribution:

Old Urbanist: A Tale of Two Densities

with some good comments
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Old 07-18-2014, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,292,241 times
Reputation: 11734
For those currently raising kids in the city, how would you feel if your kids end up rejecting the urban lifestyle you've worked so hard to provide them (similar to the way some of you have rejected the suburban lifestyle your parents worked to provide you)?
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Old 07-18-2014, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,448 posts, read 11,958,801 times
Reputation: 10561
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
For those currently raising kids in the city, how would you feel if your kids end up rejecting the urban lifestyle you've worked so hard to provide them (similar to the way some of you have rejected the suburban lifestyle your parents worked to provide you)?
I don't give a damn. They can live where they want as adults. I'm living in a city because I like it and it won't hurt them, not because I think it's better for them.
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Old 07-18-2014, 02:32 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,865,412 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
For those currently raising kids in the city, how would you feel if your kids end up rejecting the urban lifestyle you've worked so hard to provide them (similar to the way some of you have rejected the suburban lifestyle your parents worked to provide you)?
I have always wondered that myself. I grew up in the city and it does have it's downsides. People I know tend to get an automobile as soon as they can afford one rather than live an car-free or car-light lifestyle.
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Old 07-18-2014, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,573,101 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
For those currently raising kids in the city, how would you feel if your kids end up rejecting the urban lifestyle you've worked so hard to provide them (similar to the way some of you have rejected the suburban lifestyle your parents worked to provide you)?
It's their choice, no different than my parents loving out skirt suburbs and me liking more inner city neighborhoods.
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Old 07-18-2014, 07:41 PM
 
Location: bend oregon
930 posts, read 846,042 times
Reputation: 351
Now that I have a motorcycle in going to move to the outer suburbs because I don't go downtown often and I'm in my late 20's so I don't care about the city life much anymore.

My parents like the inner suburbs and I like the outer suburbs.
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Old 07-19-2014, 10:43 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,035 posts, read 102,723,474 times
Reputation: 33083
To add to this printer issue: My husband said to me, since you're on the computer, look up how to grill ribs. I found a recipe and he said "print it". So maybe we use a printer differently than some of you guys do!
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Old 07-19-2014, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,573,101 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
To add to this printer issue: My husband said to me, since you're on the computer, look up how to grill ribs. I found a recipe and he said "print it". So maybe we use a printer differently than some of you guys do!
Possibly, I do a lot of cooking and just look the recipe up on my phone and use that when cooking.
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Old 07-19-2014, 12:55 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,579,485 times
Reputation: 4048
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
If I can afford it, I'd rather have an extra room. Now I live in a studio apartment and I have 2 beds. One acts as a pseudo couch and is used for guests too. My sister moved in for 6 months, and I had another friend do that as well.
"If I can afford it" is the key point. I wanted enough house to live in, but not so much that I'd be a full-time servant to its needs. My current place is technically a 3 bedroom, and the back bedroom has a futon where I do put up guests. But generally I follow Benjamin Franklin's dictum that fish and visitors stink after 3 days. And because I didn't buy too much house, I can easily afford to put up a visiting relative in a hotel for a week. I own the house, it doesn't own me.

Facilities for entertaining guests is definitely a function of urban/suburban/rural orientation. Traditionally rural places needed more ability to care for visitors (large dining room, spare room for guests) because there probably weren't suitable nearby amenities. City people have those things at their disposal. When I have out-of-town visitors, even if they're staying at my house, we usually go out to dinner rather than eating in. Again, because I didn't buy a house with an extra room just for having dinner (not really needing one for a household of 2) I can afford more dinners out.

Interior decoration and design is also a function of the same idea. Early 20th century urban apartments used a lot of clever tricks to make up for a lack of space. Murphy beds and built-in wall furniture are probably the most common, but there are other handy widgets. My old house has a little wall cabinet in the kitchen that opens up and an ironing board pops out--located right next to what was probably the only electrical outlet in the kitchen (although before electricity people could heat an iron on the stove, or used irons heated by a charcoal container in the iron itself.) When not in use it folds away into its little box. Early 20th century "secretary desks" were models of efficient use of space: writing spaces folded up or slid into compartments, storage areas folded back and out of the way when not in use.

Modern urban residential design can make use of high-tech devices and materials to achieve the same goals. I notice a lot of households don't necessarily buy desktop computers anymore--they use a laptop. Televisions are flat nowadays, they can hang on a wall or sit on a narrow table instead of being big room-consuming pieces of furniture, and stereo speakers have shrunk from gigantic cases to cunning little boxes that sound like you're in the front row at a Van Halen concert. Printers are a lot smaller and less space-consuming. I'm sort of a throwback in that I still have a desktop PC with monitor, printer and scanner, but my uses are a lot more intense than most (I need to do high-resolution scans of images, print agendas and documents for organizations, drafts of articles and manuscripts) but it all fits into an old armoire retrofitted to the purpose by building an IKEA desk inside the armoire (total cost was considerably less than a "new" computer armoire made of particle bard with wood-grain contact paper.) Files are in an old wooden filing cabinet, research materials in a low-boy with a bookcase on top of it, and one of those aforementioned secretary desks and a table that collapses to half its size when not needed. All this fits into a room of about 120 square feet, the front half of my main living/dining area. And I know plenty of independent consultants, small business owners and freelancers who need a lot less space and equipment to manage their own businesses! Many make use of shared "coworking spaces" where they pay a nominal rent to use shared office facilities, or just set up shop in a local cafe with Wi-Fi.
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