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Old 02-14-2014, 08:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
No one moves to the suburbs, because the communities themselves are insular and you need to walk to your local synagogue on Sabbath.
Walking on the Sabbath is no great bar to moving the suburbs (as long as a large enough community is there); my North Jersey suburb is full of Orthodox Jews, as is the next town to the west.

Quote:
Philadelphia being relatively high surprises me a bit more. It's not a city known for having a good urban public school system after all. You're from there, so maybe you can shed more light.
Philly also has a large ethnic white population in the Northeast. I believe that compared to other cities (particularly NYC and Washington D.C.), the local private schools are more reasonably priced, and the same applies to larger housing in the central areas.
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Old 02-14-2014, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Yep. I think that's right.



Philly is not a very high cost city/metro. It also has a lot of non-affluent, working-class whites. For example, only 34% of the non-Hispanic White population over the age of 25 has a Bachelor's Degree or higher. In NYC, that figure is 52%. In Chicago, it's 56%. In Boston, it's 62%. In SF, it's 71%. In DC, it's an astounding 77%.

Roxborough, Northeast Philadelphia, Staten Island and select sections of the outer boroughs may contain the last vestiges of white, working-class urban America. You may also have some cities like Cleveland that have that demographic as well.
I would much rather raise a family in Philadelphia than NYC.
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Old 02-15-2014, 09:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Walking on the Sabbath is no great bar to moving the suburbs (as long as a large enough community is there); my North Jersey suburb is full of Orthodox Jews, as is the next town to the west.
Yeah, tons of Orthodox Jews live in the suburbs. In fact, the most Jewish county in the U.S. is Rockland County, NY, which is very heavily (like 35%) Orthodox Jewish yet mostly suburban sprawl (but kind of semi-walkable and semi-dense sprawl).

In fact there are huge and fast growing NYC-area exurbs that are basically 100% Hasidic Jewish. Go to Kiryas Joel, (in Orange County, NY), for example, where you have a from-scratch exurb built by and for Hasidic Jews. It's pretty dense and walkable, though.
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Old 02-15-2014, 09:48 AM
 
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I would much rather raise a family in Philadelphia than NYC.
As someone who works in the educational sector, I can tell you the public schools in NYC are a lot better than those in Philly. NYC might have the best public schools of any major U.S. city, while Philly has serious issues with plummeting enrollment, financial problems, and general low school performance.

But Philly certainly has much lower housing costs, so that has to be taken into account.
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Old 02-15-2014, 10:08 AM
 
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At my HS reunion talked with one of my old classmates who lived in the suburbs for 21 years, until the kids were grown, then moved back to the City. Another point: there are some neighborhoods that are legally within the city limits but are so boring they might as well be in the suburbs.
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Old 02-15-2014, 11:11 AM
 
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So many posts, often with little to contribute.

Here is the short version:
Families with more children have a strong desire for space. More bedrooms, and preferably a safe yard to play in without the parents watching. Due to the cost of space being much higher in cities, there will be a persistent economic shift for those with children to look for cheaper ways to get the space they would like to have.

I also live in a real suburb. I love it. I don't have kids, but I love the space. I love not having massive noise pollution, and fairly moderate levels of light pollution. I have a yard with space for myself and my dog to run. I might live in this house for the next 10 to 20 years, or I might move to another house, also in the suburbs.
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Old 02-15-2014, 11:18 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiVegas View Post
As someone who works in the educational sector, I can tell you the public schools in NYC are a lot better than those in Philly. NYC might have the best public schools of any major U.S. city, while Philly has serious issues with plummeting enrollment, financial problems, and general low school performance.

But Philly certainly has much lower housing costs, so that has to be taken into account.
A middle-class family could afford to send their kids to private school in Philly, while that would be impractical (except for maybe parochial schools) in NYC
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Old 02-15-2014, 11:26 AM
 
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Depends on how you define middle class. Private school tuition at Episcopal Academy, Germantown Friends and others of that caliber are 25K and above, per year per child. Few middle class families could afford these schools but parochial is still a possible option.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
A middle-class family could afford to send their kids to private school in Philly, while that would be impractical (except for maybe parochial schools) in NYC
Families live in the suburbs because it makes the most economical sense. You generally get more space and better public schools. To live within city limits you do have to make tradeoffs unless you're affluent enough that the money doesn't matter and the money also buys you immunity from local government services and local schools.
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Old 02-15-2014, 02:46 PM
 
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I would think it's a better idea. The commute for mom and dad will be short. The kid can go to some fancy private school. There are plenty of activities in the city for kids.

ETA: Notice I said "the kid" as in a family of 3. Chances are if you have 3 or more kids, the suburbs are more suitable.
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Old 02-15-2014, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinkmani View Post
I would think it's a better idea. The commute for mom and dad will be short. The kid can go to some fancy private school. There are plenty of activities in the city for kids.

ETA: Notice I said "the kid" as in a family of 3. Chances are if you have 3 or more kids, the suburbs are more suitable.
My wife and I are only planning on having one kid and are planning on raising that kid in an inner city neighborhood in Portland, OR. The bigger the family one wants, the more space they usually prefer. Raising more than two kids in any city these days is hard to do.
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