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Old 02-15-2014, 05:44 PM
 
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Unless you're rich, cities are for the ghetto. Not a place for kids.
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Old 02-15-2014, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by allenk893 View Post
Unless you're rich, cities are for the ghetto. Not a place for kids.
That is a false generalization.
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Old 02-15-2014, 06:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
My wife and I are only planning on having one kid and are planning on raising that kid in an inner city neighborhood in Portland, OR. The bigger the family one wants, the more space they usually prefer. Raising more than two kids in any city these days is hard to do.
I want to have an only child, too. I'd like to do so because I enjoy nice things and I also love vacations. I also fear that I won't treat my children the same. For instance, my parents didn't document my brother's (who is younger) milestones. So, they threw away my baby book.
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Old 02-15-2014, 08:24 PM
 
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Originally Posted by allenk893 View Post
Unless you're rich, cities are for the ghetto. Not a place for kids.
This is definitely wrong. Most city neighborhoods are not "ghetto" or "rich".

Unless we're talking maybe Detroit, and one or two others the major U.S. cities tend to not be dominated by "ghetto" neighborhoods, and really no U.S. city is mostly "rich".
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Old 02-15-2014, 09:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Pinkmani View Post
I would think it's a better idea. The commute for mom and dad will be short. The kid can go to some fancy private school. There are plenty of activities in the city for kids.

ETA: Notice I said "the kid" as in a family of 3. Chances are if you have 3 or more kids, the suburbs are more suitable.
What if your job isn't in "the city"? If families are going to move back into the city, then the jobs need to move back there as well.
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Old 02-15-2014, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by orlando-calrissian View Post
What if your job isn't in "the city"? If families are going to move back into the city, then the jobs need to move back there as well.
There are still a lot of people that work in our cities.
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Old 02-16-2014, 06:10 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
There are still a lot of people that work in our cities.
That's true, but assuming suburbanites who move to the city will gain a shorter commute is an overgeneralization.
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Old 02-16-2014, 06:35 AM
 
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Originally Posted by orlando-calrissian View Post
What if your job isn't in "the city"? If families are going to move back into the city, then the jobs need to move back there as well.
Not necessarily. If you live in the city, but work in the suburbs in most metro areas that's not a problem. In most big cities, rush hour traffic is caused by those who live in the suburbs but work in the city (morning rush hour is from suburbs to city and afternoon rush hour is city to suburbs). Therefore, the commute for a city-dweller to the suburbs would be rather short.

ETA: Without traffic, I live 20 min. above ATL and with traffic it's 45 min. to an hour.
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Old 02-16-2014, 07:15 AM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
That's true, but assuming suburbanites who move to the city will gain a shorter commute is an overgeneralization.
It also will depend on the city/area too. I believe that Brookings had a guide recently that showed the percentage of jobs in an area within a certain distance of the CBD/employment centers. So, living within the city may also depend on commuting patterns and employment centers, among other factors.

Here is a thread discussing job sprawl: Which metro areas concentrate jobs in the core and which like to sprawl their jobs?
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Old 02-16-2014, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
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In some cities, the jobs that left, did so to follow the people that moved to the burbs. So, it stands to reason that, if people move back to the city, the jobs will follow them again.
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