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Old 04-25-2014, 11:55 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I have to walk about 3/4 a mile to get to the train and it is just a bit too long but still doable. Can do the walk in about 12-15 minutes. But the drop off rate after 1/2 miles goes down quickly.
I am more willing to walk 3/4 of a mile to the train vs the grocery store.
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Old 04-26-2014, 12:00 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I am more willing to walk 3/4 of a mile to the train vs the grocery store.
You usually have no choice about walking to the train vs. walking to a grocery store. You need that particular train, any old grocery store could do more often than not. If you need to go the the train then and not walk your other option is by bus(but they can be slow and there is the wait time) or drive(but then you need to park might as well keep driving) maybe bike(but trains don't allow bikes at all times.)
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Old 04-26-2014, 07:28 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,986 posts, read 41,937,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
No what I am saying is that when you compare the US to countries in Europe, you are talking about countries that are about the size of an large US state, countries that have greater population density and much older roads that were not designed for an car or even an street car. This is going to make huge impacts as to what transportation is viable.
Yes, the roads are generally older. However, the intercity expressways in the UK are modern and well-maintained (speed limit is 70 mph) in better shape than roads surrounding NYC and maybe Boston.

Quote:
The UK is about 94,500 square miles, about the size of Michigan. It has a population density of 649 people per square mile. The US has an population density of 83.8 people per square mile and the state of Michigan has an population density of 175 per square mile. The UK as an whole has three times the density of Michigan.
Except plenty of the US density is irrelveant to me. The fact that the Great Plains and western US have vast swaths of barely inhabited land reduces its density numbers drastically. Is that relevant to my trips? Not at all.

[quot]In the US, you are much more likely to be or go somewhere where there is NOT the density to support an mass transit system and often NOT 24 hours. I used to head out to a burb 43 miles from Chicago at night for an social event. There is no way I could expect an town of 53,000 to be able to support an public transit system capable of getting me there after 6P.M. and back to the rail station. Sure there is commuter rail and some limited bus service to said town, but I donít live that close to the rail line on the Chicago end and there is no way from the station save an taxi on the other end. The social function meet at one place and then traveled to another for dinner (another taxi ride or impose on them to take me there). Driving is the best option here. [/quote]

This because towns themselves are lower density. A dense town of 53,000 people could support a longer running transit system.


Quote:
This is why those areas are less car dependent. They are more likely to go to a town where the busses or rail are more easy to fill because there is enough density across the country as an whole. There are old roads that canít support car transit as well and they are not likely to be going huge distances for anything. It is much easier to have retail in walking distance of much of the country when the population density of the country is high.
No one goes long distance for shopping or typical trips frequently in either country. Under your logic Canada should be more car dependent than the US because the country's density is lower. It isn't. Retail density mainly reflects local density. Retail density in New York City is greater than Chicago. Why? Residential densities are higher. Retail density in London is higher than most other American cities. The fact that New York State is less dense than England is irrelevant for retail density. The lower country density may have resulted in the country being built less dense but it's not a major factor in car dependency.

Another good example: compare the UK with Spain. Spain has a lower population density, almost a third. Where would you get higher retail density? Lower car use? Spain for both; Spanish cities and towns are much denser, however there's a lot of relatively empty areas in between the big Spanish cities.
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Old 04-26-2014, 10:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Yes, the roads are generally older. However, the intercity expressways in the UK are modern and well-maintained (speed limit is 70 mph) in better shape than roads surrounding NYC and maybe Boston.
No it does make a huge difference. For a car to be useful the whole picture has to be looked at. It does no good to just have large intercity expressways. The roads that handle traffic to your desitnation and parking also matter a lot. Narrow, older streets slow traffic down and reduce parking.

Quote:
Except plenty of the US density is irrelevant to me. The fact that the Great Plains and western US have vast swaths of barely inhabited land reduces its density numbers drastically. Is that relevant to my trips? Not at all.
Yes, it becomes relevant as to how far you can travel away from the dense cities where public transit makes sense. You don't have to go too far outside of many cities to get to areas where transit can not be available 24/7. It is also very relevant to how transit funds are spent on the Federal Level and what polices will be promoted.

Quote:
This because towns themselves are lower density. A dense town of 53,000 people could support a longer running transit system.
The town itself is lower density because 50-70 years ago it was nothing but farmland. This country still has an lot of room to spread out into. If the town had hit some natural barrier then it might have become more dense but it did not. A lot of the towns in the UK were developed and had reached their largest size before the automobile.


Quote:
No one goes long distance for shopping or typical trips frequently in either country. Under your logic Canada should be more car dependent than the US because the country's density is lower. It isn't. Retail density mainly reflects local density. Retail density in New York City is greater than Chicago. Why? Residential densities are higher. Retail density in London is higher than most other American cities. The fact that New York State is less dense than England is irrelevant for retail density. The lower country density may have resulted in the country being built less dense but it's not a major factor in car dependency.
It makes a difference out in the burbs. How far do I need to go to the store. The more dense the country the lower distance.



Quote:
Another good example: compare the UK with Spain. Spain has a lower population density, almost a third. Where would you get higher retail density? Lower car use? Spain for both; Spanish cities and towns are much denser, however there's a lot of relatively empty areas in between the big Spanish cities.
We on the other hand decided to put that empty space to use and build burbs. Spain spent much of the 20th century being not so affluent. They had a Civil War, followed by a dictatorship during the time when the automobile began it's rise. No or Fewer Autos mean smaller and less distant burbs. Spain's Economy lagged most of western Europe for the whole 20th century and so that would be an effect. No or little development of burbs as fewer people could afford them.
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Old 04-29-2014, 10:24 AM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,901,398 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nikitakolata View Post
I can't speak for anyone else but I would love that. The two things I hate most about my job are the dress code and the commute and working from home eliminates both.
The real problem is will the people using the system be willing to pay for its high cost ;and the answer has always been no in proposals. Look at light rail they are highly subsidized by feds;cities and states to most increase traffic into cities because of demographic changes cities fear will continue the decline of cities central district in much of the US.
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