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Old 02-19-2014, 09:54 PM
 
4,247 posts, read 9,716,682 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
Most of your complaints have nothing to do with transit but rather an annoyance at not being able to find the proper map at the last minute. I agree that it's silly that SEPTA doesn't have neighborhood maps in most stations but you have a smart phone, what's the problem? I also agree that it's silly that they don't have TVMs in most stations but, as was discussed, this is a temporary problem while they transition to a new fare system.

I've traveled quite a bit nationally and internationally with children. You're in a strange city with kids. Do some research before you get there. Look up "visitors center" or at the very least figure out where you're going before you leave your hotel . . . or, you know, ask someone.
It is true that my major issue was a lack of orientation. On re-reading what I wrote, I attempted to describe how I STARTED ONLINE looking for info just as I do elsewhere, and after a encountering a series of missing/garbled info I THEN sought paper visitor info and didn't find it either. I continued to describe how I WAS looking at the iPhone, out of lack of what other cities have, and describing how even that approach has shortcomings in navigating the approaches to, say, the Schuylkill River Trail

I thought it might be helpful to those who care and love one of America's great cities, how from virtual to real, Philadelphia could do a better job providing useful transit-based information to visitors. And, since I visit other cities on the same basis, without encountering quite so many issues, I conclude that either I became temporarily retarded, or Philly falls short of peer cities.

Orientation should be cheap. Heck, it's cheap enough that "guerrillas" add signs to NYC subways: Rogue Sign-Maker Hacks NYC Subway -- Daily Intelligencer Maybe SEPTA should just recruit those guys, at no cost at all!
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Old 02-19-2014, 09:55 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,988 posts, read 41,959,650 times
Reputation: 14805
The big city I've driven to and around the most by car is New York City. Boston, a bit, but mostly there and park. Philadelphia, once as a driver, again mostly got around on by foot/transit. And yes, we're like tokens?! They still got tokens!
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Old 02-19-2014, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,519,126 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The big city I've driven to and around the most by car is New York City. Boston, a bit, but mostly there and park. Philadelphia, once as a driver, again mostly got around on by foot/transit. And yes, we're like tokens?! They still got tokens!
The woman working the booth looked at us like we were idiots (though she was polite) as we were asking her how many of these tokens it took for entry. I felt like I was entering a rollercoaster ride at the carnival with the token system, but I did like their subway system. We tried their little trolley system and didn't like that system, now that felt like a scary rollercoaster system as this little bus like train went flying through these old tunnels.
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Old 02-19-2014, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,399 posts, read 21,239,668 times
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All trips I've taken the last 5 years have been to cities with a light rail or subway systems, and once there, have ridden every mile of their rail lines. And now, I'm going to re-explore all these cites, merely using their public bus systems and skip the rails next time.

First stop with this new adventure: L.A. Once your arrive at LAX, you can take the Green Line shuttle to the Aviation train station, get your TAP card for $6 and that card gives you unlimited travel on both the rail and bus lines. How's that for cheap travel within a city!!!

There's bus stops at this train stop, will hop on one of those buses and the adventure will begin. I do want to take the 770 bus line out to Monterrey Park to L.A.'s second China Town, and, from what I've gathered, that line goes further east to El Monte. I'll be able to experience L.A. like never before!!!
See something interesting along the way, hop off, explore, then hop back on a little later!

Explore a city by car? Let's leave that for the masochists!
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Old 02-20-2014, 02:38 AM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,827,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ki0eh View Post
I continued to describe how I WAS looking at the iPhone, out of lack of what other cities have, and describing how even that approach has shortcomings in navigating the approaches to, say, the Schuylkill River Trail
Schuylkill Banks Trail. Which is a nasty walkway along the east bank of the Schuylkill River and behind the businesses lining the streets, rather strongly scented of the garbage of said business. I wouldn't recommend it. The Schuylkill River Trail is something diferent.
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Old 02-20-2014, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,237,774 times
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Maybe I'm the odd man out, but I don't like exploring cities on transit. Or at least not on a subway. I'd only choose to ride a subway over a bus because it's faster. But in terms of experiencing the city, I'd choose a bus ride. You see so much more on a bus. If I'm visiting, I personally like riding the double decker tour buses. If something interests me, I can just jump off, explore, and then jump back on the next bus.

If I'm living in a city, I think the best way to "explore" is by car. But I don't really explore the cities I live in. I just learn the cities as the course of normal life dictates. I end up going to all types of places to attend recitals, graduations, retirement parties, etc. And by having a car, you have easier access to all of the areas that aren't easily reachable by transit, and you get to see everything above ground on the way.
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Old 02-20-2014, 11:13 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Maybe I'm the odd man out, but I don't like exploring cities on transit. Or at least not on a subway. I'd only choose to ride a subway over a bus because it's faster. But in terms of experiencing the city, I'd choose a bus ride. You see so much more on a bus. If I'm visiting, I personally like riding the double decker tour buses. If something interests me, I can just jump off, explore, and then jump back on the next bus.

If I'm living in a city, I think the best way to "explore" is by car. But I don't really explore the cities I live in. I just learn the cities as the course of normal life dictates. I end up going to all types of places to attend recitals, graduations, retirement parties, etc. And by having a car, you have easier access to all of the areas that aren't easily reachable by transit, and you get to see everything above ground on the way.
You may be the odd "man" out, but I'm with ya. What do you see in a subway? And yes, every city has places that transit doesn't go.
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Old 02-20-2014, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
7,142 posts, read 8,879,167 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Seems everyone on the Front Range was amazed how far away the airport was when they actually started driving there. Although it will be nice when the train does get to DIA (2015?), but it really will not help anyone in either the north or south metro area.
2016 I believe is the opening date.

That should not be a problem in Denver. Since the airport line will connect at Union Station with two rail lines to the south metro area and two lines to the west metro area. The north metro area will be a sticking point. Since RTD has pretty much gone through all their funds for rail construction, and they haven't even gotten started in the north metro area. But there will be connections at Union Station for bus service to the north area.

The big problems I see for Denver's airport line. 1. Price. RTD is already charging $13 for a bus ride to the airport. I would expect that the train ticket will cost even more. That seems kind of expensive to me. 2. Badly designed stations. It looks to me like it will be a pretty good walk from the terminal at DIA to the train station. Then another pretty good walk on the other end of the line, from the commuter train platforms at Union Station to either the light rail station or the bus station. Long walks are not fun when you are loaded down with a lot of heavy bags.
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Old 02-20-2014, 03:06 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
^^Re: price. RTD has a policy that fares must be 1/3 of the direct cost of the ride.
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Old 02-20-2014, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,331,720 times
Reputation: 3562
We only travel to places that are walkable and dense for vacation, for the most part, because we find them more interesting. Walking, biking and transit are the best ways to see a city IMO. Airbnb works wonderfully with this kind of trip because you get tips and information from people who actually live there (and often times are in neighborhoods rather than touristy areas).

I can't remember the last time I chose to visit someplace (vs travel for work) that required a car to get around.
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