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Old 02-23-2014, 08:03 AM
 
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There are 17 states whose capital is their largest city: Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho,Indiana, Iowa, Mass. Miss. Ohio, Oklahoma, RI, S Carolina, Utah, W Virginia & Wyoming.

Either the largest city or a central location seems to work for most states except Alaska.
How the hell did the capital end up in a location the the rest of the state can not drive to???
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Old 02-23-2014, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
There are 17 states whose capital is their largest city: Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho,Indiana, Iowa, Mass. Miss. Ohio, Oklahoma, RI, S Carolina, Utah, W Virginia & Wyoming.

Either the largest city or a central location seems to work for most states except Alaska.
How the hell did the capital end up in a location the the rest of the state can not drive to???
Juneau was the largest city in Alaska when it was picked to be the capital.
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Old 02-23-2014, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Originally Posted by Tekkie View Post
Why are some state's capital cities not their largest cities?

It seems to me that ideally your economic driver would also serve well as your governmental core. Are there any particular reasons why some states decided to keep their governmental cores separate from their economic cores? Was it to stave off political influence over business?
Curious question. The only two cities that I know of where this is the case are Indianapolis and Columbus, in both cases they are the largest cities in their respective states. And in both cases both cities annexed everything within their county limits. They might actually be larger than their counties now, someone could correct me if I'm wrong.

I would not want my state capital to be my economic driver, because this tells me that the other cities in my state are either not doing their job, or aren't doing that great of a job at what little they are doing. I can't speak for Indy, but the fact that Columbus is the largest city in Ohio speaks volumes about that states decline. Ironically, the population of the state continues to go up each census, but I would not want everyone living in Columbus.

Also, how do you keep your governmental core separate from the economic core? As though they are mutually exclusive. Washington DC is the nation's capital, but as a city it can hold it's own. It is still the largest city in it's region, having finally surpassed Baltimore.

As other posters have noted there are actually 17 states where this is the case, but those cities are not really well known, and none of the state capitals strike me as interesting. Your post precludes that the money SHOULD be in government, as though there should be a concerted concentration of power and influence in the state capitals outside of what already exists. What about those that do not want to work in government; talk to people in the state I am in now and ask them what their true feelings on this are. Granted that is influence of the federal government I am speaking of, but still ...
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Old 02-23-2014, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tekkie View Post
Why are some state's capital cities not their largest cities?

It seems to me that ideally your economic driver would also serve well as your governmental core. Are there any particular reasons why some states decided to keep their governmental cores separate from their economic cores? Was it to stave off political influence over business?
It is actually a good thing that this is not the case. America would be like Russia, or China or something else similar. Moscow and Beijing have moved on but they are not New York or LA, for example.
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Old 02-23-2014, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Valdosta (Atlanta Native)
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Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Curious question. The only two cities that I know of where this is the case are Indianapolis and Columbus, in both cases they are the largest cities in their respective states. And in both cases both cities annexed everything within their county limits. They might actually be larger than their counties now, someone could correct me if I'm wrong.

I would not want my state capital to be my economic driver, because this tells me that the other cities in my state are either not doing their job, or aren't doing that great of a job at what little they are doing. I can't speak for Indy, but the fact that Columbus is the largest city in Ohio speaks volumes about that states decline. Ironically, the population of the state continues to go up each census, but I would not want everyone living in Columbus.

Also, how do you keep your governmental core separate from the economic core? As though they are mutually exclusive. Washington DC is the nation's capital, but as a city it can hold it's own. It is still the largest city in it's region, having finally surpassed Baltimore.

As other posters have noted there are actually 17 states where this is the case, but those cities are not really well known, and none of the state capitals strike me as interesting. Your post precludes that the money SHOULD be in government, as though there should be a concerted concentration of power and influence in the state capitals outside of what already exists. What about those that do not want to work in government; talk to people in the state I am in now and ask them what their true feelings on this are. Granted that is influence of the federal government I am speaking of, but still ...
How are they not well known?
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Old 02-23-2014, 06:29 PM
 
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Annapolis was the Capitol of Maryland before Baltimore really got off the ground. Why Move it?
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Old 02-23-2014, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Originally Posted by demonta4 View Post
How are they not well known?
Well Alaska's state capital for one. And more people have heard of Charleston, SC than they have Charleston, WV. A lot of State capitals are not well known, except to fans of geography, which I used to be at one time, before I discovered computers.
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Old 02-23-2014, 07:30 PM
 
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Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Well Alaska's state capital for one. And more people have heard of Charleston, SC than they have Charleston, WV. A lot of State capitals are not well known, except to fans of geography, which I used to be at one time, before I discovered computers.
Was this your favorite song?

Wakko's 50 State Capitols - YouTube
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Old 02-23-2014, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Animaniacs in the Urban Planning forum! What revolutionary ideas could be next?
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Old 02-23-2014, 08:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Juneau was the largest city in Alaska when it was picked to be the capital.
Juneau became Territorial Capital in 1906 (moved from Sitka). Until 1920 Fairbanks was bigger than Juneau.
In 1906 transportation was much easier to Juneau than Fairbanks. Especially back to the lower 48.

By statehood in 1959, when Juneau became State Capital, Anchorage was much bigger than Juneau.
Also by 1959 Anchorage was much better connected to the the state highway system.
And 50 years later you still can not drive to Juneau from the rest of Alaska.
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