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Old 02-24-2014, 06:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Marv101 View Post
Columbus has exploded population-wise over the past 50-60 years as have other rapidly growing cities including other state capitals such as Austin & Indianapolis, while folks have been deserting forlorn cities such as Cleveland, Cincinnati, Detroit and Chicago in droves for several decades, which certainly explains why Columbus is 'under-radioed' for a city its size, much as Atlanta was until recently.
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Could it be because White Castle is headquartered there, and Wendy's in suburban Dublin? Fast food, and government, are fast growing industries and Columbus is poised to "capitolize" on both.
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Old 02-25-2014, 04:26 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Annexation is an amazing thing, isn't it?
My sentiments exactly
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Old 02-25-2014, 04:01 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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The territorial capital of Colorado was Golden. When CO became a state, the capital was moved to Denver. I don't remember the story of "why". Neither are mid-state. Mid Colorado would be about Buena Vista (roughly, Eddyline!). Golden is the last town before ascending to the mountains on I-70. Denver is about 15 miles east.

The territorial capital of Nebraska was Omaha. DH went to high school in the old capital building. Omaha is as far east as one can go in Nebraska. It's on the west bank of the Missouri River. The east bank is Iowa. The capital was moved to Lincoln, about 50 miles to the west. Still nowhere near mid-state. Mid-state would be at about Elm Creek. (You will need quite a detailed map to find that. It's west of Kearney.)
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Old 02-25-2014, 04:58 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
The territorial capital of Nebraska was Omaha. DH went to high school in the old capital building. Omaha is as far east as one can go in Nebraska. It's on the west bank of the Missouri River. The east bank is Iowa. The capital was moved to Lincoln, about 50 miles to the west. Still nowhere near mid-state. Mid-state would be at about Elm Creek. (You will need quite a detailed map to find that. It's west of Kearney.)
Speaking of Nebraska, the state provides an example in which varied political and cultural factions in different parts of the state sought influence by vying for the location of the capital in their sections of the state:

Thomas P. Kennard House: Building a Prairie Capital - Reading 1

Lincoln, Nebraska - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

According to these and other articles I've read, when Omaha was the territorial capital, people living south of the Platte River felt that they had different interests than those of Omaha. When Nebraska became a state, the south-of-the-Platte crowd sought greater influence in state affairs by lobbying to have the new state capital located in their part of the state.

Nebraska became a state in 1867. With the Civil War having ended just two years earlier, sentiments favoring the Union and the Confederacy were still strong. South of the Platte, down closer to Kansas than Omaha was located, there was a volatile clash of loyalties similar to that which had made Kansas the violent territory known as "bleeding Kansas" in the years leading up to the war. The story goes that when Nebraska was admitted to the Union, some of those advocating to keep the capital in Omaha pushed to change the name of the proposed capital south of the Platte from Lancaster to Lincoln, in the (vain, as it turned out) hope that naming the town after Pres. Lincoln would sabotage support among the area's many Southern loyalists for making Lancaster/Lincoln the capital.

Speaking of Abraham Lincoln, this article states that more than 20 years before he became president, Lincoln was involved in the push to make his home of Springfield the capital of Illinois:

History of Springfield, Illinois.

There's an interesting bit of history about how Bismarck became North Dakota's capital. The story involves a bit of skullduggery, and the trivia that Bismarck is the state's de facto capital but has never been officially designated as such. As with Nebraska's case, the history of North Dakota's capital involves some vying for influence between cities in different sections of the state.

I had included a quoted passage about this, but it appears that this may be a copyright infringement, so I edited out that passage. But the history is that Jamestown had been initially established as the new state's capital despite the fact that Bismarck had been the capital of Dakota territory. Legend has it that some residents of Bismarck, wanting their town to remain the capital, stole the state records from their storage in Jamestown and took them to Bismarck. Bismarck has been North Dakota's de facto capital ever since, without ever having been officially designated in that role.

So there's an example of a person influential within the state lobbying for his town to become the capital (Abe Lincoln and Springfield), which I also have read was the case in Pennsylvania, where the capital was named for a man named Harris who had influence in the state, influence he used to push for the town he preferred to become the capital. And the cases of North Dakota and Nebraska, examples of vying political, social, and cultural factions in different sections of each state pushing for their parts of their states to gain the influence that would result from being the site of the capital.

Thinking about the question posed in this thread, I've also wondered whether upstate-downstate competition might have been a particular kind of competition between sections of a state, in states where one city was clearly the largest, most economically influential in the state at the time the capital was established.

It makes sense to think that residents outside of the largest city's vicinity would have pushed to gain some influence of their own by having the capital located away from the state's metropolis, but I haven't been able to find any clear examples of this. Springfield became the capital of Illinois before Chicago was really even on the map. From what I've read, the capital of Michigan moved from Detroit, the seat of territorial government, to Lansing after MI became a state, after numerous close votes in the legislature, with nearly every town in the state being considered.

Albany would seem likely to be an example of a capital purposely located away from its state's largest city in order to balance the influence between upstate and downstate, but the several articles I've read about that history point more toward Albany's central location along transportation routes, particularly the Hudson River-Erie Canal water route and roads crossing New York on the way west from New England. Still, I can't help thinking that in some states with stand-alone largest cities, where the capital is located elsewhere in each state, there may have been some attempt to balance the influence between the big city and the more rural areas.

Last edited by ogre; 02-25-2014 at 05:15 PM..
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