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Old 02-22-2014, 11:19 AM
 
318 posts, read 643,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
My only experience would involve Lima, Peru, and it may be in a class by itself. It has close to ten million residents in something like 42 distinct districts with 42 mayors who sort of cooperate while controlling their own district. There is a city-wide government with some umbrella powers and duties. There are over 400 private bus/transit operators but traffic is horrendous. It seems to be very segregated by wealth with some districts, like Miraflores, being wealthy and resembling the US in a lot of ways. Then there are large areas of extreme poverty and close to 80% of the population is below the local poverty level. Like a lot of Latin American cities, Lima experienced a huge influx of rural population looking for a better life economically but also escaping the violence of the Shining Path insurgency in the 1980s and 1990s. Peru's economy was strong while the rest of the world was in recession. Maybe Lima is the exception but I can't say that it resembles Europe or the US.
SunGrins, your first sentence is right on the mark about Lima! I have not been all over the world like some posters, but based on my limited travel experience, Lima is very different. I did quite a bit of walking in Peru and I feared for my life when crossing streets. Rome street crossing was challenging but nothing like Lima. I'm amazed I got back to the hotel in one piece. Never have I heard so much horn honking. Any visitor would have to be nuts to try driving in that city.

I typically don't use the hotel car services because of cost, but in Lima I used it anytime I had to go a significant distance because the taxi system is scary. No posted fares. Nearly all independent drivers. You could be hailing a serial killer, or more realistically, someone who cheats you or won't let you out til you pay more than negotiated.

Worst of all, a city of 9 million and no subway system. The bus system, as you pointed out, is ridiculous; a bunch of painted up school buses with a guy yelling the destination out the window. I'm sure the locals understand it, but no way I get on one of those buses. But no subway system for a city that big? Wow.

It is hard for me to see how Lima will ever be able to develop into a fully modern city. But I will also say that Peruvians are among the nicest people I have ever met.
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Old 02-22-2014, 11:28 AM
 
318 posts, read 643,512 times
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I have only been to Peru, Chile and Costa Rica.

I posted something in response to another comment; Lima defies explanation or comparison. If I had to explain Lima, I would say that it is a little bit more American. It is more spread out, with no metro system or organized bus system, so cars and taxis are more necessary. But certain districts, like Miraflores, are walkable and seem a little bit European. But if forced to choose, I would say Lima is more American.

I would say that Santiago definitely falls into the "more European" category. Santiago was my first experience with South America so I didn't know what to expect, so when I got there and walked around, I couldn't help thinking about how much it reminded me of the European cities I've visited. Lots of cafés, good and clean subway system, and pretty walkable. The tree-lined neighborhoods struck me as more European than American.

I really didn't see much of San Jose, Costa Rica. What I did see would fall more into the America system.

That being said, all three were unique.

Great question!
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Old 02-22-2014, 11:30 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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Indeed, I know a woman from Peru, utterly and sincerely nice
Never been to Lima, though, sounds a bit like Indian cities
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Old 02-22-2014, 11:35 AM
 
318 posts, read 643,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sage 80 View Post
Many Latin American cities are like a hybrid of the two.

As in Europe:
They often have a dense center, where very wealthy people live, and most people work. There are lots of big businesses, banking corporations, government offices, cultural sites, cathedrals, high-end shopping, parks, restaurants, book stores, large boulevards. These centers are very pedestrian friendly, and mass transit is usually decent--especially subways.

As in the US:
They are often car oriented because they tend to be very large in area; thus the wealthy and middle class usually have cars. The city centers usually have sky-scrapers in abundance. Poor people tend to live on the periphery of the city center, or close to the center in occasional, small slum neighborhoods that receive poor services. The poor areas tend to have lots of class resentment and high crime. There are affluent suburbs for the wealthy and middle class who prefer to have more space, safety, and quiet. The suburbs are impractical and there is not much in the way of culture in them. People who live in those areas must travel to the center for work, and cultural activities like museums, theaters, etc.


Good examples of such cities are Mexico City, Sao Paulo, Rio, Bogota, Caracas.
That's a good summary
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Old 02-22-2014, 11:40 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,448 posts, read 19,328,093 times
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I don't think there are a lot of skyscrapers in Latin America, high-rise building yes, but skyscrapers?

Just checked the statistics for Brazil, the tallest building in that country is only 170m, built in 1960. Unlike in the US high-rise buildings are mostly apartment towers, not office buildings.
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Old 02-22-2014, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Planet Earth
3,853 posts, read 7,643,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Isn't that particularly because the infrastructure on the outskirts isn't very good? A lot of times they get informal (shantytowns) settlements on the edges without much services.
Pretty much. Since it's harder to build good infrastructure up in the hills, development is usually in the form of informal settlements.

Quote:
Originally Posted by poopycat View Post
But no subway system for a city that big? Wow.
They don't have a subway system, but they do have an elevated rail line (one line so far, but they plan on expanding it), and a BRT system.
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Old 02-22-2014, 01:19 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
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Santiago, Chile seems to be similar to big Brazilian cities, lots of apartment towers all over the place...

http://samandkaty.files.wordpress.co...sep-2012-7.jpg

One of the positive results of that is that there are always people around, no abandoned city centers at night.
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Old 02-22-2014, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,072 posts, read 16,098,416 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poopycat View Post
SunGrins, your first sentence is right on the mark about Lima! I have not been all over the world like some posters, but based on my limited travel experience, Lima is very different. I did quite a bit of walking in Peru and I feared for my life when crossing streets. Rome street crossing was challenging but nothing like Lima. I'm amazed I got back to the hotel in one piece. Never have I heard so much horn honking. Any visitor would have to be nuts to try driving in that city.

I typically don't use the hotel car services because of cost, but in Lima I used it anytime I had to go a significant distance because the taxi system is scary. No posted fares. Nearly all independent drivers. You could be hailing a serial killer, or more realistically, someone who cheats you or won't let you out til you pay more than negotiated.

Worst of all, a city of 9 million and no subway system. The bus system, as you pointed out, is ridiculous; a bunch of painted up school buses with a guy yelling the destination out the window. I'm sure the locals understand it, but no way I get on one of those buses. But no subway system for a city that big? Wow.

It is hard for me to see how Lima will ever be able to develop into a fully modern city. But I will also say that Peruvians are among the nicest people I have ever met.
Not many developing countries can afford mass transit systems. India is only now getting to it outside of of Kolkata and Delhi, neither of which are comprehensive by any means.
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Old 02-22-2014, 02:31 PM
 
4,363 posts, read 3,241,464 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neuling View Post
I don't think there are a lot of skyscrapers in Latin America, high-rise building yes, but skyscrapers?

Just checked the statistics for Brazil, the tallest building in that country is only 170m, built in 1960. Unlike in the US high-rise buildings are mostly apartment towers, not office buildings.
Officially, the minimum height for a building to be considered a skyscraper is 12 stories. One story is usually 10 feet.
10 ft x 12 stories= 120 ft. 120 ft is approximately 37m. There are lots of office buildings that tall, and taller in those cities.

Frequently Asked Questions - SkyscraperPage.com
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Old 02-22-2014, 03:06 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,448 posts, read 19,328,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sage 80 View Post
Officially, the minimum height for a building to be considered a skyscraper is 12 stories. One story is usually 10 feet.
10 ft x 12 stories= 120 ft. 120 ft is approximately 37m. There are lots of office buildings that tall, and taller in those cities.

Frequently Asked Questions - SkyscraperPage.com
Just 12 stories In that case almost any city has skyscrapers, even my rural small town of 10k souls has one

On Wiki it says that there is no official definition, but that one definition says high-rise up until 100m and skyscraper above 100m...
These days I find even that definition outdated, to me skyscrapers start at, say, 200m or 50 stories. My intuition...
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