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Old 03-09-2014, 08:05 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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New York city's satellite cities contain a rather high amount of poverty. But if you compare more typical suburban areas, say all of long island to NYC the ratio in poverty rates is 3.1. Partly because long island has tried to zone out the poor
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Old 03-09-2014, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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I think in about 10 years suburban poverty will be very high.

Poverty rates surge in American suburbs | Video | PBS NewsHour | PBS

Demography: Broke in the

Face of US poverty: These days, more poor live in suburbs than in cities - CSMonitor.com
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Old 03-09-2014, 10:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by memph View Post
Basically, in Sacramento's case, it sounds like the difference between suburbs and between different parts of the city is likely bigger than the difference between the city as a whole and the suburbs as a whole.

Is there much suburban poverty outside of South Sacramento?
In the smaller rural communities of the metro area, the more run-down parts of Arden-Arcade, and parts of the north area like Rio Linda and North Highlands, sure. I get the sense that a lot of people assume urbanity and poverty are a cause/effect ratio. But it seems to be that the cities are generators of wealth--the suburbs, at most, accumulate it, or they become de facto cities in order to generate their own.
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Old 03-10-2014, 01:06 AM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Vancouver may be rather inverted; I don't think it's poorer than many of it's auburbs
Vancouver is less working class (i.e. it has a higher proportion of professionals and people with university degrees than most of its suburbs) but still has a higher poverty rate.
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Old 03-10-2014, 03:08 AM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
London has rather weak geography patterns; it's often neighborhood by neighborhood

Inner London has among the highest poverty rates in the uk. It is also among the richest. Traditionally London had it's wealthy areas to the west and northwest of the center city. Which is more centered around westminster than the city. Past that, London is a bit of a muddle, but outer London is more middle class . Some areas past the greenbelt are rather wealthy, surrey in particular, which the uk's wealthiest county. rather good commuter rail access to central London jobs, faster than parts of outer London . Called the "stockbroker belt"
London boroughs by per capita incomes:

http://data.london.gov.uk/documents/...al_Incomes.pdf

Seems pretty similar to New York in that respect.
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Old 03-11-2014, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Originally Posted by wburg View Post
In the smaller rural communities of the metro area, the more run-down parts of Arden-Arcade, and parts of the north area like Rio Linda and North Highlands, sure. I get the sense that a lot of people assume urbanity and poverty are a cause/effect ratio. But it seems to be that the cities are generators of wealth--the suburbs, at most, accumulate it, or they become de facto cities in order to generate their own.
Looks like mostly 50s/60s vintage suburbs.

Anyways, there's a small pocket in suburban Brampton that's a little unusual, I might've mentioned it before. Basically, because of a legal/zoning oddity, this is one of the few places in Brampton where basement apartment are legal. The result is that there's now city blocks in this subdivision that will have anywhere from five to over seven people per "house", that's on average, and some of the "houses" aren't even true SFH but semi-detached houses.

The neighbourhood looks pretty typically suburban, and it's fairly new, unlike the older post WWII suburbs that more commonly have poverty.
http://goo.gl/maps/mbuk5

I'm not sure exactly how poor the census tract ranks in the GTA for average income, poverty rate and %of income spent on housing, but for all of those metrics, it is among the poorest.

I guess it's a bit like some of the communities in Connecticut, poor people have jobs and a need to live there, but zoning is keeping housing affordable to them limitted to certain areas. Except that in this case, it's not really intentional and the housing options for poor people are being limitted to some random subdivision that just happened to be built when basement apartments were made legal by the province before that was repealed a year later (but existing ones still had to be grandfathered in). Combine that with already large household sizes in many new parts of Brampton without basement apartments (averaging 4-5 people, often over 5 for larger SFHs) and you get this anomaly.
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Old 03-12-2014, 02:22 PM
 
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I would say Toronto has more wealth in the "outer boroughs" - particularly the immediate postwar suburban areas around York Mills and to a lesser degree central Etobicoke. New York for instance has some outer borough wealth like in parts of Queens (Forest Hills Gardens, the suburb-type areas of northeast Queens that border Nassau County) but nothing in the outer boroughs would be among the New York metro's wealthiest census tracts - they would all be in Manhattan or in the suburbs. In London, the most-far flung boroughs are akin to the middle class areas of Queens and Staten Island and the wealthy areas are either in the inner city or in the home counties which somewhat resemble Westchester and suburban areas of New Jersey etc.

Toronto also has less outer-suburban wealth than New York or Toronto - Oakville is the closest and there are rich exurban pockets of King Township etc. but it's more middle class. Hard to think of a Toronto equivalent to say Chappaqua NY.

ETA: Of course the rich suburbs in outer boroughs of Toronto is due to the fact that it developed later. By the early 1900s Westchester County and the "stockbroker belt" had already developed, while the wealthy in Toronto didn't have to move as far.

Last edited by King of Kensington; 03-12-2014 at 03:16 PM..
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