U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-06-2014, 12:19 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,072 posts, read 16,102,108 times
Reputation: 12647

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCityTheBridge View Post
SF owns many of the local parking garages. It also owns and operates street parking meters. I'm not aware of indirect taxes on parking revenue from private garages that goes to the transportation fund in SF. Yes, city government raiding transportation funds for pet projects is an unfortunately common problem.
Well, there is. SF, like most cities, has a parking tax. Just because you aren't aware of it doesn't mean it doesn't. San Francisco has had the current 25% parking tax since 1990. It isn't like it's new. And yes, 40% of it has been earmarked for Muni. Now you're aware.

http://www.sfcontroller.org/Modules/...documentid=236
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-06-2014, 12:22 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,072 posts, read 16,102,108 times
Reputation: 12647
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I just happened to read this article today about how Stanford got its employees to take transit to work.

The went from 70% single occupancy car to 40% single occupancy car. And it isn't right by the train station, more like 1 mile away.

Stanford transportation czar to retire, leaving blueprint behind - Silicon Valley Business Journal

I am sure people probably complained initially, but they took away most of the roadblocks for employees, and saved from having to construct 2000-3000 more parking spaces. (And parking construction costs anywhere from $10k-30k a space, this doesn't include ongoing maintence.)

The make it super easy not to drive from free shuttle to the train, subsidized transit passes and even working with transit agencies to create bus routes to better serve its employees (even ones that live 30 miles away).

Interesting model in how business can help encourage transit / reduce congestion.

PS Stanford is in an area of the bay where nobody takes transit.
Weren't the socialists in San Francisco protesting the Google/Facebook buses? Those are running to basically the same part of the Bay Area as Stanford is in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-06-2014, 12:30 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,698,541 times
Reputation: 26671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Weren't the socialists in San Francisco protesting the Google/Facebook buses? Those are running to basically the same part of the Bay Area as Stanford is in.
Yes, but the rents have tripled near the bus stops over about 6 years. But it all plays into the nimby problem, mountain view/Palo Alto have 2.5-3x more jobs than residences and refuse to build. South of SF Is devoid of remotely anything urban so if you want that sort of lifestyle you need to travel 30 miles.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-06-2014, 12:54 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,072 posts, read 16,102,108 times
Reputation: 12647
Centera broke ground in San Jose late last year, just the newest of the high-rise buildings in San Jose. One Market is under construction, Oak Development, KT properties is planning another residential high-rise, old IBM site by Blossom Hill continues to be developed. San Jose saw a bit of a lull during the recession, but construction has come back quickly.

Palo Alto especially is very NIMBY, San Jose less so. I'm not in the PA/MV area all that often as they aren't hubs the way San Jose and San Francisco are for the legal field. I think the only times I've been to Palo Alto is Stanford, which is undergoing a lot of construction. The downtown is about what you'd expect for a college town.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-06-2014, 01:06 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,698,541 times
Reputation: 26671
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Centera broke ground in San Jose late last year, just the newest of the high-rise buildings in San Jose. One Market is under construction, Oak Development, KT properties is planning another residential high-rise, old IBM site by Blossom Hill continues to be developed. San Jose saw a bit of a lull during the recession, but construction has come back quickly.

Palo Alto especially is very NIMBY, San Jose less so. I'm not in the PA/MV area all that often as they aren't hubs the way San Jose and San Francisco are for the legal field. I think the only times I've been to Palo Alto is Stanford, which is undergoing a lot of construction. The downtown is about what you'd expect for a college town.
San Jose has got a long way to go for downtown to feel like an actual urban neighborhood, it really feels more like LA downtown, trying to find an identity. It makes small strides every time I go but doesn't feel especially vibrant.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-06-2014, 09:59 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,991 posts, read 42,018,377 times
Reputation: 14811
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Well, there is. SF, like most cities, has a parking tax. Just because you aren't aware of it doesn't mean it doesn't. San Francisco has had the current 25% parking tax since 1990. It isn't like it's new. And yes, 40% of it has been earmarked for Muni. Now you're aware.

http://www.sfcontroller.org/Modules/...documentid=236
Philadelphia has a 20% tax on parking garages [not sue on the details]. NYC has 10% tax for parking an additional 8% for commercial parkers within Manhattan. It's not earmarked for anything, it's just another type of sales tax:

Business - New York State Sales and Use Tax
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-06-2014, 10:37 AM
 
3,565 posts, read 1,877,900 times
Reputation: 2263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Well, there is. SF, like most cities, has a parking tax. Just because you aren't aware of it doesn't mean it doesn't. San Francisco has had the current 25% parking tax since 1990. It isn't like it's new. And yes, 40% of it has been earmarked for Muni. Now you're aware.

http://www.sfcontroller.org/Modules/...documentid=236
I would like to see a higher percentage go to MTA, but that is good to know. Thanks for the link.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top