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Old 03-12-2014, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 30,033,517 times
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Good points about parking. When the whole foods near me opened, one huge complaint was the amount of bike parking. The store opened with about 25-30 spots. That sounds good right? Well within a couple of weeks bicyclists complained about the lack of parking. Now our whole foods has about 60 spots. I typically go on the weekend and the spots are a hot commodity. Last night I went around 9 pm, I usually don't go that late. And there were 25 bikes parked in the first zone! They might need another 20-30 spots.

We also have a problem at our transit stations. My closest one has about 130 spots. They fill up quickly. I need to go tomorrow in the late afternoon, hopefully there is a bike spot for me. Last time I went around 5 I only found 3 spots.
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Old 03-12-2014, 11:50 PM
 
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Bike parking is becoming the secret weapon of modern cities. Where I live, it's practically economic suicide to open up a new business without installing a bike rack in front. We recently started a "bike corral" program that replaces one parking space in front of a business with a dozen bike racks. The cycling customer stops more frequently and spends more money!
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Old 03-12-2014, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 30,033,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Bike parking is becoming the secret weapon of modern cities. Where I live, it's practically economic suicide to open up a new business without installing a bike rack in front. We recently started a "bike corral" program that replaces one parking space in front of a business with a dozen bike racks. The cycling customer stops more frequently and spends more money!
We have a similar program as well. Most commercial districts have quite a few spots but corrals are few and far between.

There is also a policy where large events have to have a bike valet, this year I plan to use it at the huge food fest during the late summer!
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Old 03-13-2014, 12:27 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Interesting video series on bicycling in various places: Videos in "One Billion Bicycles - the global bicycle story" on Vimeo
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Old 03-13-2014, 12:33 AM
 
8,330 posts, read 14,683,086 times
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Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
We have a similar program as well. Most commercial districts have quite a few spots but corrals are few and far between.

There is also a policy where large events have to have a bike valet, this year I plan to use it at the huge food fest during the late summer!
A local bike advocacy group runs a bike valet for events--I use it when visiting our neighborhood farmer's market!
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Old 03-13-2014, 12:42 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 30,033,517 times
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Originally Posted by wburg View Post
A local bike advocacy group runs a bike valet for events--I use it when visiting our neighborhood farmer's market!
Hmmm I don't think any of our farmers markets have bike valets. But I have been slacking on my regular markets lately. I have been going to the Sunday one at the waterfront that has a billion parking spaces. The ones on the Main Street fill up fast but on the next block there are 20-30 more spots that are half full. A lot of people are lazy though and jury rig weird parking when they could walk a few more feet.
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Old 03-13-2014, 01:21 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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More on biking in cities around the world in the guardian: Cycling in cities: the search for the world's most bike-friendly metropolis | Cities | theguardian.com
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Old 03-13-2014, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
1,070 posts, read 2,399,746 times
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In Tempe, AZ at the transit center, they have a secure bike storage area. Works pretty well, people who live in the area (mostly ASU students) can ride their bikes to the transit center, put it inside, in a locked, secure, monitored storage facility, and take the light rail or busses around town. Alternatively, commuters could leave a bike there, take the bus / light rail to campus, and retrieve their bike, giving them means to get around campus. I love this idea -- one big downside to public transit is getting around areas once you're at your destination. Most people don't want to walk, and busses and trains don't make much sense to go a few blocks. Sure, you can take a bike on a bus or a train, but sometimes there's not enough room. Leaving a bike locked up at your destination is a great way to get around this.

I can't remember where I saw it (I think it was a video, maybe one of you guys could look it up for me), but I remember seeing a "bike club" type of business. Basically, they set up shop near a central business area, and offered inside storage racks for bikes, as well as locker rooms / showers, and even racks and tools for repairs. If I remember right, there was a monthly membership for a reserved space. Something like this would be a great addition to a bikeway system, but it'd also require businesses to be centered around a certain area. There's plenty enough discussions in this forum on urban vs suburban development, but building a well implemented system would encourage businesses to set up shop closer together. It's the same basic concept of TOD, just with bikeways instead of mass transit.

Using Phoenix as an example, a system of bikeways (protected bike lanes as well as protected intersections, with priority signals for cyclists) could supplement the existing light rail line and bus system. I'd start with downtown Phoenix, the Central Ave corridor, and downtown Tempe. Tempe would see the most ridership initially (due to Arizona State -- students already bike all over, this would just encourage safe practices), but growth of downtown would speed up. For people who say it's too hot in Phoenix: build a better bike path. An overhanging roof design could provide shade. Throw solar panels on top and you create enough electricity to power light. Studies show blue lights have a calming effect, and reduce crime and violence in areas (there's a case study out of Japan if you're inclined to look it up). I'm sure someone more artistic could create a modern, nice-looking blue-lit roof. In Phoenix, staying hydrated is an issue. Why not every few blocks, have a bike "rest stop", with water fountains and misters? That'd be a nice little break.

Honestly, bike infrastructure isn't difficult.
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Old 03-17-2014, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 30,033,517 times
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Older article about the "invisible cyclists" aka the people who don't choose to ride their bikes, they are forced to by circumstance. Without the protection of bike lanes, expensive bikes or fancy gear.

http://phmelod.files.wordpress.com/2...g-magazine.pdf
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Old 03-18-2014, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,858,957 times
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Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Great article, one thing people often times overlook is the health benefits that come from bicycling. If I had a business I would take someone who commuted by bike over someone who drove to work for that reason.
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