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Old 03-20-2014, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,660,252 times
Reputation: 26651

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I suppose you could leave a cheaper bike at the Caltrain station by your office. A good design would be for Caltrain to be timed with BART to enable quick transfers.
The bigger problem is that Caltrain only goes to my station 2X an hour between 8-10 and 1x till 4-ish, and then 2x till 6:30ish, and 1x and hour after that. But it is annoyingly scheduled like at :08, :22 (and nothing in-between). And it would be like $4 to go 2 stops. Too pricy. So I'd rather bike there if I was going to do it. The city bus is cheaper and takes 30 minutes (that runs every 30 minutes) vs the 7 on the train. But the train is another 10 minutes of walking and the bus is on my block. Not sure if BART and Caltrain are timed, but BART runs at least every 15 minutes, so I don't have to worry about the schedule.
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Old 03-20-2014, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,660,252 times
Reputation: 26651
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Boulder only has 100,000 people. I doubt there's huge demand for bikes at 3 AM.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
It has college students who can be nocturnal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
And there is a huge crowd at 2 am when the bars close.
In the summer when it gets really hot, I often ride after midnight when it has cooled down.
Last call is a good driver for more trips, but seriously since the Bike Share is automated anyway, what;s the difference of having hours that the keys work, and hours that they don't. A mostly person-less, contact-less system should be 24/7. (Yes I realize there is customer service, but like many other businesses it could just be closed after midnight.)
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Old 03-20-2014, 05:37 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Last call is a good driver for more trips, but seriously since the Bike Share is automated anyway, what;s the difference of having hours that the keys work, and hours that they don't. A mostly person-less, contact-less system should be 24/7. (Yes I realize there is customer service, but like many other businesses it could just be closed after midnight.)
Biking under the influence?

I have no idea how this system works; it was just an article I thought was interesting.
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Old 03-20-2014, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,660,252 times
Reputation: 26651
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Biking under the influence?

I have no idea how this system works; it was just an article I thought was interesting.
I know that is "illegal" but to be honest, I would be fine driving an hour after having a cocktail vs driving. (I have a 1 drink max most of the time, and just wait for 2 hours.....Low tolerance!) Biking frees me up to leave sooner, or go crazy with a drink and a half.

Most of the bikeshares have a keyring thing or a card, you just slide it in the pod, and the bike is yours. When you are done you slide it in another pod and check out with your card. That's why I was surprised!

I am not a member of our local Bike Share. They planned it horribly!

SFCTA Report: Expand Bike-Share in San Francisco ASAP | Streetsblog San Francisco

So we have like 700 bikes. Half are in SF. The other half are scattered around suburban parts of Silicon Valley (in downtowns near the train).

Now the SF coverage is only downtown, and not in very many neighborhoods. And Silicon Valley has a car commute share of 88% and transit commute share of 3%. And most of the offices are about 3 miles from the train. So not really sure who was supposed to use the bike.

Some further out SF neighborhoods are clamoring for bikeshare. And even logical areas, like the mission and castro, which are 2 miles from downtown, have a 30% bike modeshare to downtown, and bike lanes the whole way, do not have stations!

There aren't stations in Oakland or Berkeley, which also have high bike ridership, and areas that are 1-1.5 miles from the BART that aren't well served by frequent transit, but easily bikeable. Oh and there are lots of bike lanes. I just found out the posh city up the hill from me has the 3rd highest bike commute mode share in our county (after Berkeley and Oakland of course) and most routes in require a steep hill! More bike riders than in Silicon Valley, bikeshare would have worked better there to connect them with the commercial districts in Oakland.

Hopefully they expand logically soon! I would join if it was actually in Oakland's downtown (which is perfect because there is an up and coming section, on the waterfront, about 3/4 of a mile from BART. There is a popular free shuttle that helped to connect it to downtown, and there is a bike lane most of the way! There is also a ferry to SF, and the reason I never take the ferry is since it only runs about 1x and hour on the weekend, and the bus choices suck, I don't want to be stranded either way. (The walk isn't especially pleasant, it used to feel more menacing, now it is OK, but there is a huge overpass separating things). Bike sharing would connect the downtown residents or the waterfront residents easily.
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Old 03-20-2014, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,514,457 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Stupidly, some of the designated bike routes are packed with stop signs. The one near my house has a stop sign every other block. All of the streets in the area have similar frequencies, but after the first 3/4 of mile closest too my house, there are less stop signs, and you can go pretty fast. Downtown is packed with stop lights, and most of the time I hit them all or 75% of them on the way home. Hopefully Oakland will retime the lights soon with the planned better bike lanes and protected infrastructure.
That is just poor planning, and an easy problem to correct.
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Old 03-20-2014, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,660,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That is just poor planning, and an easy problem to correct.
Timing is low on the current list. The city is in expansion road, but most of the parallel streets have protected lanes on the table so it will improve eventually. I live in a section with a gap in the bike lanes. The gap is about 3 blocks. Then there are a few boulevards but they are disconnected in blocks here and there.on the up note, the printed bike maps actually include most of Berkeley and the two cities did coordinate the bike land and bike boulevard streets. (About 50% of the north south streets in north Oakland connect to Berkeley. And some east west ones do as well. There is one street the exits and enters both Berkeley and Oakland twice lol!)
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Old 03-21-2014, 05:42 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,514,457 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Timing is low on the current list. The city is in expansion road, but most of the parallel streets have protected lanes on the table so it will improve eventually. I live in a section with a gap in the bike lanes. The gap is about 3 blocks. Then there are a few boulevards but they are disconnected in blocks here and there.on the up note, the printed bike maps actually include most of Berkeley and the two cities did coordinate the bike land and bike boulevard streets. (About 50% of the north south streets in north Oakland connect to Berkeley. And some east west ones do as well. There is one street the exits and enters both Berkeley and Oakland twice lol!)
That's cool, good to see they are working towards a good bike infrastructure.
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Old 03-21-2014, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,660,252 times
Reputation: 26651
Default Rockville, MD Going Bike Crazy

Nice story on small town with big bike infrastructure

In Rockville, a quiet bicycling transformation takes place - Greater Greater Washington

Quote:
As one of the few incorporated cities in Montgomery County, Rockville is in a unique position to plan its transportation. Since 1999, volunteers on the Rockville Bicycle Advisory Committee (RBAC) have worked with the city to expand infrastructure and develop bicycle-friendly policies. Today, the city has 34.3 miles of separated bikeways and 33.5 miles of shared lane designations.
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Old 03-22-2014, 03:33 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Neat! I'm friends with the author.
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Old 03-23-2014, 02:26 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
OK, I see all the posts about Rockville being a "small town" have been deleted. That said, it's still not a small town. The things that work in Rockville will not work in a small town. For example,hardly any small town will be able to afford to hire " a full-time pedestrian and bicycle coordinator" (from the link). It (the town) won't have the tax base for that.

And big whoop that it has "34.3 miles of separated bikeways". MY suburban CITY, with roughly 1/3 the population of Rockville, has almost as many, 26 miles.
Trails
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