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Old 03-06-2014, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,580,362 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Good design can lower or raise the ambient temperature, or prevent a foot of snow from falling?

Golly!
Good clothes can help with the temperature, that is just common sense. I owned rain gear in Portland, Or for a reason and used it often when biking.

Also, can you drive in a foot of snow? No, you need plows to clear the roads, but you can also own winter tires for your bike which is basically studded tires for your bike. Though I will say that is for the more diehard bikers, I tend to wuss out at that point, but have seen people bike in that kind of weather before.
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Old 03-06-2014, 06:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Good clothes can help with the temperature, that is just common sense. I owned rain gear in Portland, Or for a reason and used it often when biking.

Also, can you drive in a foot of snow? No, you need plows to clear the roads, but you can also own winter tires for your bike which is basically studded tires for your bike. Though I will say that is for the more diehard bikers, I tend to wuss out at that point, but have seen people bike in that kind of weather before.
With Light Colorado Powder a foot is not a problem when fresh. Heavy snow becomes a problem at about 5-6" when your feet are pushing through heavy snow with every rotation.

One of my favorite sayings: "There is no bad weather, just bad gear!"
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Old 03-06-2014, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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I won't be biking in the snow...ever. But more power to you!
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Old 03-07-2014, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
With Light Colorado Powder a foot is not a problem when fresh. Heavy snow becomes a problem at about 5-6" when your feet are pushing through heavy snow with every rotation.

One of my favorite sayings: "There is no bad weather, just bad gear!"
Wish I could rep you, so true. The only problem I used to have was my fingers would get cold below 20 degrees. Now I have these, and my fingers are NEVER cold:

Bar Mitts - Ride in Comfort

Rode in 9 degree weather recently with spring-time gloves and these things and my hands were nice and warm!
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Old 03-07-2014, 03:41 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
One of my favorite sayings: "There is no bad weather, just bad gear!"
Mine, too, but that's only slightly out of the realm of urban planning. Even the best infrastructure cannot overcome someone's personal preference of not riding a bike in 110 degree temperatures, or during a rain or snow storm.

Or, at this time of year, not wanting to ride a bike because of the mammoth potholes.
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Old 03-07-2014, 04:07 PM
 
Location: IL
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I bike to the train most days of the workweek. My rule is I look out the window in the winter and if snow is falling when I look I don't ride. I also didn't ride one of the polar vortex days, it was -15F, but I did ride on a few -10F days this year. The key is dressing appropriately. I look a bit like a skier on a bike, haha.
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Old 03-07-2014, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Mine, too, but that's only slightly out of the realm of urban planning. Even the best infrastructure cannot overcome someone's personal preference of not riding a bike in 110 degree temperatures, or during a rain or snow storm.

Or, at this time of year, not wanting to ride a bike because of the mammoth potholes.
But it doesn't cost much to build a bicycle infrastructure so that it would be there for those that do want to use it. Also the mammoth potholes exist because the east coast is obsessed with using salt instead of de-icer which doesn't rot the roads.
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Old 03-07-2014, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
But it doesn't cost much to build a bicycle infrastructure so that it would be there for those that do want to use it.
Oh, good grief, follow along, would you? Here is your quote that I'm referencing:

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That is the thing when people try to say where they live isn't a good place to bike because of weather, that usually means no one has shown them what good design looks like.
Pray tell, what kind of "infrastructure" are you going to build to shield bikers from undesirable temperature, humidity, and precipitation? And how much is it going to cost?
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Old 03-07-2014, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,580,362 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Oh, good grief, follow along, would you? Here is your quote that I'm referencing:


Pray tell, what kind of "infrastructure" are you going to build to shield bikers from undesirable temperature, humidity, and precipitation? And how much is it going to cost?
The cost would be less than 1% that is spent on interstate infrastructure.

And people do bike during less desirable weather. Also, are you trying to suggest there are never good times to bike because there is always some form of storm, polar freeze, or 100 degree days? I would be that one could bike a majority of the year where you live with the weather you get.
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Old 03-07-2014, 09:34 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,581,646 times
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The idea that cyclists have to be shielded from undesirable temperature, humidity and precipitation is a fallacy. The most important thing to shield cyclists from are cars.
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