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Old 03-27-2014, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,170 posts, read 29,674,744 times
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Bike lane biz benefits. Not sure if I posted this:
Bikes Lanes Aren't Just Safer For Cyclists. They're Good For Business, Too | Co.Exist | ideas + impact
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Old 03-27-2014, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,170 posts, read 29,674,744 times
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I don't think of bike infrastructure as a partisan issue, but sometimes it comes up as one. Mayor of Indy, is in full support:
Indianapolis’ GOP mayor on bikes and the ‘great revival’ of US cities | PeopleForBikes

His comments on how he thinks bikes will help the city grow and attract business:

Quote:
America's cities are preparing for a great revival. Many planners note that when our country built the interstate highway system starting back in the 1950s it enabled an exodus from urban areas to the suburbs. As we meet today, the tides of that population outflow are reversing and we are witnessing a re-migration to our cities.
For many decades transportation planning centered on the movement of people and goods between commercial and residential centers. Today, our cities face a much different transportation need one of connecting people to each other and unique experiences.

New urban dwellers want to be connected to their neighborhood and their city through means other than a car. ... Today I am asking this committee to support our cities as we seek to build the bike lanes, trails and greenways that serve all the people who want to live, work and raise their families in the new American city. ...

The battle for the future of American cities will be won by the place that attracts and retains talent. ...

The eight-mile Indianapolis Cultural Trail used to be traffic lanes and parking spaces. It now carries cyclists and pedestrians and serves as a worldwide model. ... In the few short years since it opened, the trail has attracted at least $100 million in new investment to the city. In fact, just last week we approved a new 28-story residential and retail tower on a lot that fronts the trail in downtown Indianapolis. ...

This trail and many other examples in cities across America demonstrate a bold new thinking toward urban transportation planning. A highway to a new factory may still be critical to attracting new jobs and moving these goods to market. But if you want to attract that facility's workers to live in your city, you need sidewalks, bike lanes, greenways and so much more.
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Old 03-29-2014, 12:16 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,943,432 times
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In these times when federal dollars are disappearing in funding; if bikers want better they need to consider paying for it some now in fees and/or taxing themselves.T hat is the plain and simple truth.
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Old 03-29-2014, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,170 posts, read 29,674,744 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
In these times when federal dollars are disappearing in funding; if bikers want better they need to consider paying for it some now in fees and/or taxing themselves.T hat is the plain and simple truth.
That's a silly arguement. Most bikers have cars (and obviously pay other local taxes). Do we have a pedestrian tax? Is the bicycle tax proportional to wear and tear on the road? How does that work? The simple fact is our city streets are not only for car users, but our designs do not take this into account. Roads are a form of public space that should be designed for a multitude of uses.
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Old 03-29-2014, 01:08 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,989 posts, read 41,979,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
That's a silly arguement. Most bikers have cars (and obviously pay other local taxes). Do we have a pedestrian tax? Is the bicycle tax proportional to wear and tear on the road? How does that work? The simple fact is our city streets are not only for car users, but our designs do not take this into account. Roads are a form of public space that should be designed for a multitude of uses.
I talked to someone from the UK and he said he heard the "bicycles should pay taxes for roads, too" argument, there too. But the reasons he thought it was a stupid statement is that gas/vehicle taxes aren't set (or tried to be) set for roads or road maintenance; they're just general fund taxes.

For here, one of the reasons is not a sensible arguement is the bulk of road spending is for road improvements that are either useless or negative for bicycles. Road widening to speed up traffic? Highways, which often ban bicycles? Designing the road to be safe at higher speeds, extra turn lanes [latter might be useful? Etc.
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Old 03-29-2014, 03:56 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Btw, the part of the local bike path is still snow covered, well more ice. Maybe next week...
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Old 03-29-2014, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,170 posts, read 29,674,744 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I talked to someone from the UK and he said he heard the "bicycles should pay taxes for roads, too" argument, there too. But the reasons he thought it was a stupid statement is that gas/vehicle taxes aren't set (or tried to be) set for roads or road maintenance; they're just general fund taxes.

For here, one of the reasons is not a sensible arguement is the bulk of road spending is for road improvements that are either useless or negative for bicycles. Road widening to speed up traffic? Highways, which often ban bicycles? Designing the road to be safe at higher speeds, extra turn lanes [latter might be useful? Etc.
I mean even if you decided that the portion of road monies set aside for bikes should be proportional to the percentage of users, every city would fail. Overall commute use of bikes is about 1% and road spend in bikes typically works out to be .5% or less. In bike riding metros with 5% bike mode share spend is typically 1-1.5%. I'd be happy if the spend was proportional to ridership, it would double bike spending in most cases. Sometimes triple and quadruple.

Bike infrastructure is cheap and only requires a tiny fraction of available road (and sidewalk, parking lot) space.
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Old 03-29-2014, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,170 posts, read 29,674,744 times
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Oakland recently did a public survey about redesigning a major thoroughfare and commercial corridor.

Interestingly enough, the survey was in total agreement, everyone voted for bike lanes. There is a ton of bicycle traffic, as it is the most direct route to Berkeley at the north and downtown oakland at the south. With several commercial neighborhoods along the route. And access to a train station in the middle (on the next block). Pill Hill, the medical district is also adjacent to the corridor and tons of other stuff. If you live within 5 miles you like go somewhere in the corridor monthly or more frequently to go out to eat. To the drugstore or the doctor.

The respondents were evenly spilt between drivers, walkers, transit users and bicyclists. And the results had broad agreements across each group. Everyone's. Answered basically echoed the more bike lanes and nicer sidewalks refrain.

Here is a quick summary of the results.

http://www.eastbayexpress.com/SevenD...ore-bike-lanes
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Old 03-29-2014, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Tucson AZ & Leipzig, Germany
2,378 posts, read 7,764,578 times
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I just returned home (Orange County, CA) from visit to Tucson AZ for 5 days. This is a good time of year for a visit Tucson with cool mornings and warm, sunny afternoons. I always bring along my bike on trips to Tucson and have pedaled all over the metro area on their vast network of bike lanes (along city street shoulders), shared user paths and city streets that are designated "bikeways". First time visitors that want to pedal around the city should get a free copy of the excellent Tucson Metro bike map, published by Pima County Dept of Transportation.

Bicycle and Pedestrian Program - Pima County

Most of the terrain within the Tucson metro is gentle, and a large percentage of the city area is in a grid layout. This means that there is a big choice of east to west routes, and a big choice of north to south routes. There is also a 55 mile Loop Route along a number of shared use paved pathways that is almost complete. As the name implies, it takes you on a loop around the city, in large part along paths that parallel river "washes" that are dry most of the time, but can become raging rivers after summer monsoon rain storms. No matter what direction you are riding in around the loop, you will have a view of mountains in all directions up to 30 or 40 miles away.

Tucson is not as hip, prosperous or upscale as Portland or Denver. Many of the city streets have rough pavement, so I don't advise a skinny tire racing bike. It has a lot of attractive areas but some of the neighborhoods are gritty, but so do most cities in the US. The economy is weak with few good paying jobs. But it is an interesting place with good food and enough to keep me entertained. And it is one of few medium to large metro areas in the USA that has figured out how to make it possible to get almost anywhere in the city on a bicycle along routes that are well designed. You will see more year round bicycle transportation and utility cyclists in Tucson that in almost any other city in the US, with the possible exception of Portland or New Orleans. If a relatively poor (in financial terms) city like Tucson can do this, why can't other cities in much better financial condition figure this out?
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Old 03-31-2014, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,170 posts, read 29,674,744 times
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Trending: Bike repair as economic development.

Here is one way to keep the kids off the street and expand biking to new audiences.

Can Cities Change the Face of Biking?

We've also got a community bike shop too: the bikery – Cycles of Change
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