U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-14-2015, 12:55 PM
 
2,289 posts, read 1,294,870 times
Reputation: 1520

Advertisements

I looked at a web site about cycling. There was a comment that cyclists consider 10 miles one way to the farthest practical commute.

Still, that sounds like it could be useful in a semi-urban area, or even in a "walkable suburb".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-16-2015, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,975 posts, read 4,078,755 times
Reputation: 1208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
I looked at a web site about cycling. There was a comment that cyclists consider 10 miles one way to the farthest practical commute.
I agree with this. Mine would be 11 miles which I occasionally do the entire distance (on a folding bike with 20 inch wheels!) but usually take the bus part of the way for the part where it is dangerous and there is no bike infrastructure. If I could do the entire distance in bike lanes and/or paths, I could totally imagine myself doing it each way daily, after a month of so of building up endurance on the bike (mainly for the part that's a 50 ft bridge generally against the wind!). Where I lived before, it was 23 miles, which I could only do the entire distance a few times a month and could not imagine doing it both ways every day even--and I do 5k's/10k's/HMs and even did one sprint triathlon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2015, 04:00 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,004,178 times
Reputation: 1348
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
I looked at a web site about cycling. There was a comment that cyclists consider 10 miles one way to the farthest practical commute.

Still, that sounds like it could be useful in a semi-urban area, or even in a "walkable suburb".
Depends on the complexity of the route, availability and quality of bike infrastructure. If 95% of the route was on a grade-separated, shaded, generally flat bikeway then the commute can be longer than if the route is complex, dangerous, or hilly.

But, yes, even under optimal conditions, 10 is a good distance. That said, 10 miles, even on a complex route, can cover a huge area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2015, 01:39 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,655,359 times
Reputation: 26646
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
I looked at a web site about cycling. There was a comment that cyclists consider 10 miles one way to the farthest practical commute.

Still, that sounds like it could be useful in a semi-urban area, or even in a "walkable suburb".
10 feels too far to me. That stRts gettimg into wearing special clothes and needng a shower. And that isn't appealing.

But I think focusing on the commute trip is the wrong idea. Most people make loads of trips in a day, mostly under 3 miles. These are ideal for a bike and the ride is pretty much the same as driving + parking in many cases. 3 miles also doesn't requre special clothing. We should encourage biking for errands.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2015, 08:08 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,937,844 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
I looked at a web site about cycling. There was a comment that cyclists consider 10 miles one way to the farthest practical commute.
I think it depends on the person, job and weather. <2 miles is almost the same time as driving, 4-5 miles is short enough it doesn't feel like much work nor is long at a slow pace nor is the weather as much of an issue. 10 miles is for someone who really likes cycling, or for a sporadic commute. I had a neighbor who did a 20 mile bike commute, so for some 10 miles is too low. He did it only half of days in decent weather, and it was with a racing bike.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2015, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,509,053 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I think it depends on the person, job and weather. <2 miles is almost the same time as driving, 4-5 miles is short enough it doesn't feel like much work nor is long at a slow pace nor is the weather as much of an issue. 10 miles is for someone who really likes cycling, or for a sporadic commute. I had a neighbor who did a 20 mile bike commute, so for some 10 miles is too low. He did it only half of days in decent weather, and it was with a racing bike.
I have gotten my 7 mile commute down to under 30 minutes, which much of it is a nice long trail where I can push my bike as fast as it will go if I want to.

10 miles is typically a good radius to look at, especially when evaluating bike routes and creating a safe infrastructure for cyclists.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2015, 12:20 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,937,844 times
Reputation: 14804
Biking on the bike path today. Whenever it crosses a road, the bike path gets a stop sign and a crosswalk. Always seemed a bit unfair, that the bike path gets a stop sign and the road doesn't. If I can see there are no cars in any distance when crossing, I blow through the stop sign without slowing down. Two of the times on the path there was a car approaching the intersection. First time was about to get to the intersection about the same time as me. I hadn't entered the road yet, and I had a stop sign but the car stopped for me. I have the stop sign, he doesn't. Unless I'm in the intersection already, the car shouldn't be yielding to me. Either he thinks he's being nice, or the crosswalk makes him think he should yield. I wave him through. Happens frequently. Often the car yielding saves me no time, I can't trust that a car that has the right of way is going to stop, so I have to stop anyway, and then make sure he's truly stopping.

Another intersection: not paying as careful attention, see a car stopping at the crosswalk, so go through the stop sign without thinking. Get yelled at, "you should stop" with an obscenity. Then why did he stop for me? Perhaps because he didn't I was going to stop, I would have if he hadn't stop... I have noticed some drivers and pedestrians have a bad sense of how quickly bicycles can stop. Annoyed at the driver, though felt a bit bad for going through the stop sign. But I shouldn't. Clearly, anyone that easily angered has issues and is at fault; in general I believe you shouldn't give an angry person what he or she wants, it encourages further bad behavior.

Another time, same situation but without the obscenity. I yelled back, "why did you stop for me?". If I did, it might have just been me trying to wave the confused driver: "you should go!"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2015, 12:23 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,937,844 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I have gotten my 7 mile commute down to under 30 minutes, which much of it is a nice long trail where I can push my bike as fast as it will go if I want to.
I've timed a few times on my commute when I went faster on Strava. Fastest (8.2 miles, 210 feet elevation gain), 28m43s biking time, 29m45s total time, about another 0.3 miles was timed on Strava. Not sure if that's practical as a commute for most, for one thing you'll get a bit sweaty unless maybe it's cool.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-20-2015, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,975 posts, read 4,078,755 times
Reputation: 1208
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
10 feels too far to me. That stRts gettimg into wearing special clothes and needng a shower. And that isn't appealing.

But I think focusing on the commute trip is the wrong idea. Most people make loads of trips in a day, mostly under 3 miles. These are ideal for a bike and the ride is pretty much the same as driving + parking in many cases. 3 miles also doesn't requre special clothing. We should encourage biking for errands.
Very true. Also, most of those short trips are not going to be as, er..., odor or sweat sensitive, as getting to work. A few miles to connect to mass transit ("last mile") is also more practical than biking all the way to work for many people.

We have a popular bike share system here which means you don't even have to own and maintain a bike and worry about theft for those short trips. And usually the time it takes to bike is the same time you'd otherwise have to deal with finding street parking or dealing with multi-level garages, let alone the actual driving time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2015, 02:00 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,509,053 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I've timed a few times on my commute when I went faster on Strava. Fastest (8.2 miles, 210 feet elevation gain), 28m43s biking time, 29m45s total time, about another 0.3 miles was timed on Strava. Not sure if that's practical as a commute for most, for one thing you'll get a bit sweaty unless maybe it's cool.
Personally I naturally get sweaty when I do any biking regardless of my speed, though at my job it is very easy for me to change clothes and dry off. I am hoping by the end of summer that I am able to shave a few more minutes off my commute, though the hard part is the beginning and end where I can interact with cars which always slows me down.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top