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Old 03-08-2014, 12:36 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
It's not exactly safe to drive during extreme weather events either, one might even argue it's more dangerous to drive than bike or walk due to the damage such a vehicle can do when you hit something. I suppose I am spoiled from living in a city with remarkably good cycling/walking weather most of the year, but Minneapolis is one of America's greatest cycling cities, and many Scandinavian countries, who also get lots of snow, are the places with even more bike culture. They seem unconcerned with what the folks here think they should not be doing, and ride their bikes anyhow.
The Finnish poster who posts regularly on other subforums and I've quoted several times on this forum says that he mostly stops biking three months a year and uses public transit for those months instead. One of the reasons he doesn't like winter as much as other seasons. I suspect his biking behavior is common there.
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Old 03-08-2014, 12:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The Finnish poster who posts regularly on other subforums and I've quoted several times on this forum says that he mostly stops biking three months a year and uses public transit for those months instead. One of the reasons he doesn't like winter as much as other seasons. I suspect his biking behavior is common there.
In that case, it's a good thing that the same sort of urban design principles that promote biking and walking also promote good public transit. Heck, even I tend to take transit more in winter and bike less often in our chilly 40-50 degree winter cold snaps! But I doubt some of the folks who frown on foul weather biking here think of transit as their preferred foul-weather alternative to biking.
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Old 03-08-2014, 12:54 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
In that case, it's a good thing that the same sort of urban design principles that promote biking and walking also promote good public transit. Heck, even I tend to take transit more in winter and bike less often in our chilly 40-50 degree winter cold snaps! But I doubt some of the folks who frown on foul weather biking here think of transit as their preferred foul-weather alternative to biking.
My old housemate was happy to happy with a mild winter we got a few years with average highs in the 40s so he could bike most days. I assumed the same people who ride bikes would ride transit instead it it weren't for biking, but that's probably true only in more transit-oriented or college areas and not so much in auto-oriented American ones.
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Old 03-08-2014, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
LOL, a tunnel or a covered bike path!



I think that is a good policy. I don't think people should be out biking during snowstorms. There's decreased visibility, snow removal probably not underway or just barely so.
Depending on the type of bike path, trees provide the right kind of shade while biking.
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Old 03-08-2014, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
It's not exactly safe to drive during extreme weather events either, one might even argue it's more dangerous to drive than bike or walk due to the damage such a vehicle can do when you hit something. I suppose I am spoiled from living in a city with remarkably good cycling/walking weather most of the year, but Minneapolis is one of America's greatest cycling cities, and many Scandinavian countries, who also get lots of snow, are the places with even more bike culture. They seem unconcerned with what the folks here think they should not be doing, and ride their bikes anyhow.
I have only flown through Minneapolis, but I have heard this before.
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Old 03-08-2014, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
It's not exactly safe to drive during extreme weather events either, one might even argue it's more dangerous to drive than bike or walk due to the damage such a vehicle can do when you hit something. I suppose I am spoiled from living in a city with remarkably good cycling/walking weather most of the year, but Minneapolis is one of America's greatest cycling cities, and many Scandinavian countries, who also get lots of snow, are the places with even more bike culture. They seem unconcerned with what the folks here think they should not be doing, and ride their bikes anyhow.
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I have only flown through Minneapolis, but I have heard this before.
We were discussing winter biking a year or so ago on this forum, and I posted some stats about Minneapolis. Contrary to popular opinion, and what you read in urbanist publications, biking goes WAY down in Mpls in the winter. Now my daughter has moved there, and she can confirm that. You may do a search for my stats, I'm not doing it, nor am I looking them up again.

Anyone who thinks biking in snow is less dangerous than driving in it has another think coming, as my mom used to say.

Copenhagen, a big biking city, does not get much snow OR cold weather, again, despite urban legend. Copenhagen gets little "real" cold weather, either. The all time low there is 0 degrees F. That is warmer than Pittsburgh! Only Jan. and Feb. have average lows below freezing, at 30 and 28 degrees, respectively. Nor does it get lots of rain, though it has a lot of rainy days.
" The annual rain fall in Denmark averages 61 cm (24 in) of precipitation. Copenhagen has an average of 170 rainy days. The greatest rainfall comes between September and November. Snow is rare. You can also take a look at the current local weather in Denmark's cities. "

Then there's Sweden. Colder, but again, not *that* extreme. Lowest ever temp, -17 F. Warmer than Denver. Average lows Dec-March in the 20s, 31 in April.
"There is an important weather divergence between northern and southern Sweden: the north has a long winter of more than seven months. The south, on the other hand, has winter weather for only two months and a summer of more than four." (Most of the people in Sweden live in the southern part of the country.)

Norway:
Coldest ever, -15. Similar to Sweden.
"In Norway, the climate varies considerably from coastal to inland areas. The coastal regions have a climate with relatively mild winters and cooler summer months. Inland areas have a continental climate with colder winters, but warmer summertime (for example Oslo). "
Weather in Denmark
Weather in Sweden
The Weather in Norway
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Old 03-08-2014, 04:40 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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I guess it depends on your idea of real cold weather. Long island hasn't gone below 0f for several decades, never heard anyone say it doesn't get real cold weather. In any case, except in some great lakes cities, most winter days do not get heavy snow. And roads are plowed quickly. I used to bicycle in a rather snowy part of upstate NY . Some days had issues, most did not and the roads were clear. The temperatures did make it less enjoyable. As for being more dangerous than driving, a bicycle does ok with small amounts of snow, there is a danger of sliding cars but again if it's that bad then I wouldn't want to be driving either.
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Old 03-08-2014, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Depending on the type of bike path, trees provide the right kind of shade while biking.
What kind of tree are you going to plant in Phoenix to shade bikers?
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Old 03-08-2014, 05:13 PM
 
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In fact, the League of American Bicyclists released a report in 2013 showing that about 1/3 of bike trips are taken by people who make less than $30,000 per year. In many communities, people are riding bikes because thatís how they get to work. So this isnít just an issue of recreation; itís an issue of equality, bringing people together, expanding the middle class, and helping people who are trying to get into the middle class. It's an issue of making sure, when someoneís only or best option to get to work is a bike, that they have an option to ride it, and ride it in safety. (quote).
Fortunately that means that 2/3 make over $30,000. Politicians won't listen to anyone below that level, but they might take notice if enough make over $100,000. Some pay thousands for their bikes, and even more for accessories.
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Old 03-08-2014, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
What kind of tree are you going to plant in Phoenix to shade bikers?
Is it always 100 degrees in Phoenix? There is a thing such as architecture where one can design things that provide shade along bike paths. There is always a solution for every problem.

Though I doubt right wing Phoenix will ever become a bike friendly city.
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