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Old 03-09-2014, 08:08 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,937,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
We were talking about Phoenix. The only reference to your own biking experience is that sometimes you ride w/o a shirt. The rest could be applicable to Phoenix, Tucumcari or wherever.
That does not mean I was contributing to the Pheonix conversation.



I was not talking about Phoenix. I wasn't thinking about Phoenix when writing about it, nor did I quote anything regarding Phoenix. It couldn't be applicable to Phoenix as I mentioned shade.
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Old 03-09-2014, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
5,311 posts, read 5,328,925 times
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I ride all summer in Richmond. It's pretty easy actually, but there are nuances. It's often 90+ degrees and HUMID. The key is finding a gym near work that you can use to shower/change/etc. If that's not possible, I would just go easy and keep as low sweat as possible (it's cooler in the mornings than at mid-day anyway).

Clothing is another big factor. Shirts that wick the sweat, a helmet that breathes well (if you wear one), etc.
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Old 03-09-2014, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Finland
24,268 posts, read 18,773,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The Finnish poster who posts regularly on other subforums and I've quoted several times on this forum says that he mostly stops biking three months a year and uses public transit for those months instead. One of the reasons he doesn't like winter as much as other seasons. I suspect his biking behavior is common there.
I suspect the poster you quote would be me. Yes, I mainly stop biking during the winter months, not mainly because of safety hazards, but mostly of the inconvenience. I have a street-bike with street tyres around an inch wide, so poorly plowed roads are both unsafe and physically very demanding. Add the cold and it's also uncomfortable. During mild winters, like this one, I stopped biking only for a mere three weeks.

Yes, you're quoting me correctly and I prefer public transport during the winter months, so does many others, but some in this thread maybe exaggerate the dangers of winter biking. Snow isn't the main enemy of bikers, but ice, wind and single digit F temperatures.

As the urban sprawl is rather controlled, the distances you'll have to bike are usually quite short, wich encourages biking also during the winter. A combination of good public transport and good biking roads is the key, and both should be encouraged. As a plus I could say if you bend the rules a bit, like run red lights, biking is often in the downtown the fastest method of transport. I would say that in this city biking is the most popular way of commuting during spring, summer and autumn.

Maybe I should start to write on the Urban Planning forums, as some people discuss my habits without me even knowing.
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Old 03-09-2014, 11:15 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,988 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
I ride all summer in Richmond. It's pretty easy actually, but there are nuances. It's often 90+ degrees and HUMID. The key is finding a gym near work that you can use to shower/change/etc. If that's not possible, I would just go easy and keep as low sweat as possible (it's cooler in the mornings than at mid-day anyway).

Clothing is another big factor. Shirts that wick the sweat, a helmet that breathes well (if you wear one), etc.
There are a couple of posts below about helmets, but you can look at the whole thread:
Bicycle Culture of Boulder - why no helmets?

People who don't wear helmets are destined to become idiots.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Research report on why Canadian cycling rates are much higher than American, even though the weather is crappier. http://policy.rutgers.edu/faculty/pu...icyArticle.pdf

(Policy and infrastructure)
I think they finagled the accident statistics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oulous View Post
Yes helmets are protective, you can not dispute that but do they decrease the number of accidents?

Try to see the difference here.

You are talking about injury while I am talking about accidents.

I am not on the side of yes or no helmets but the math of statistics, risk and human behavior. In general many things we do to make ourselves safe cause us to be more reckless.

Currently I live in Amsterdam in the Netherlands and no one, I mean no one wears a helmet here for day to day biking.

Nationally the total of bicycle accident deaths hovers around 200.
In Amsterdam about 6 people die in bike-related accidents yearly.
16 million Dutch own 18 million bikes.
About half the population of the NL rides a bike once a day.
The average distance traveled by bike per person per day was 2.5km in 2006.
The bicycle is used for almost a quarter of all journeys, and 35% of journeys below 7.5km.

By those stats the deaths per year are very low. If you can instill a culture of biking then helmets are not necessary as it becomes like any other chance death
you might have.

For example you can be walking on a 3 foot high wall, fall off and die. If you were wearing a helmet you probably wouldn't die but you don't need a helmet to
walk on a wall.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
So the Netherlands, with about 1/20th the population of the US, has 1/3 the bicycle deaths of the US. The US had 618 deaths from bicycling in 2010. If it had the same rate as the Netherlands, it would have had 4000. The Netherlands' death rate from bicycling is ~ 6X higher than the US'. Maybe we're on to something here, especially when you take into consideration that there is far more opportunity for a bike/automobile crash here.

bicyclinginfo.org: Bicycle Crash Facts
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Old 03-09-2014, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Mt. Airy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
There are a couple of posts below about helmets, but you can look at the whole thread:
Bicycle Culture of Boulder - why no helmets?
There are definitely arguments that if you don't wear a helmet, you're less likely to be hit because you're more aware due to the danger of not wearing a helmet. I think in places that are very bikeable, and where you're not going far, it's reasonable to not wear one. However, I wear one whenever I leave my neighborhood because I have to ride on relatively fast moving roads.
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Old 03-09-2014, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,655,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
There are definitely arguments that if you don't wear a helmet, you're less likely to be hit because you're more aware due to the danger of not wearing a helmet. I think in places that are very bikeable, and where you're not going far, it's reasonable to not wear one. However, I wear one whenever I leave my neighborhood because I have to ride on relatively fast moving roads.
When people skip the helmets, i think it is a sign the infrastructure is safe. I my home city, helmet use is around 50%. There are cyclists on most roads and routes so drivers are pretty aware generally. Where I work, helmet use is more like 75%. They have no infrastructure so people riding are generally exercising or adventurous. There is a group where helmet penetration is low, the people riding their bikes to the day laborer pick up spots. The other group with low helmet penetration are the train commuters. I will stereotype those people as hipsters young people who bike for transportation. (The commuters are clear because the train from San Francisco requires you to tag your back, and if you live in SF, you don't likely live near the train station. It is a quick bike ride to the station from many neighborhoods, but a really really long transit ride). Those commuters also bike in normal clothing and actually use u-locks properly. All the other people use cheaply chains. I think bike theft is super low in my work city. (Most younger workers in my work city work at startups. There are a million in the office buildings and above the downtown storefronts so it is a reasonable stereotype)
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Old 03-09-2014, 01:06 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,988 posts, read 102,554,590 times
Reputation: 33053
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
There are definitely arguments that if you don't wear a helmet, you're less likely to be hit because you're more aware due to the danger of not wearing a helmet. I think in places that are very bikeable, and where you're not going far, it's reasonable to not wear one. However, I wear one whenever I leave my neighborhood because I have to ride on relatively fast moving roads.
And those arguments are bullsh*t! It's like those old anti-seat belt arguments that came up when the first seat belt laws were proposed, or the anti-infant car seat arguments, ditto. Here's one link.

Bicycle Helmet Statistics
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Old 03-09-2014, 01:54 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,819,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
When people skip the helmets, i think it is a sign the infrastructure is safe.
Relatively few in NYC wear a helmet, and the infrastructure is silly dangerous.
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Old 03-09-2014, 02:03 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,988 posts, read 102,554,590 times
Reputation: 33053
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
When people skip the helmets, i think it is a sign the infrastructure is safe. I my home city, helmet use is around 50%. There are cyclists on most roads and routes so drivers are pretty aware generally. Where I work, helmet use is more like 75%. They have no infrastructure so people riding are generally exercising or adventurous. There is a group where helmet penetration is low, the people riding their bikes to the day laborer pick up spots. The other group with low helmet penetration are the train commuters. I will stereotype those people as hipsters young people who bike for transportation. (The commuters are clear because the train from San Francisco requires you to tag your back, and if you live in SF, you don't likely live near the train station. It is a quick bike ride to the station from many neighborhoods, but a really really long transit ride). Those commuters also bike in normal clothing and actually use u-locks properly. All the other people use cheaply chains. I think bike theft is super low in my work city. (Most younger workers in my work city work at startups. There are a million in the office buildings and above the downtown storefronts so it is a reasonable stereotype)
When people skip helmets, it means they are stupid, and setting themselves up to be even more stupid.

Re: bike theft, virtually everyone I know who lived in Champaign-Urbana, IL had a bike stolen at some point in time, including me. Thefts were the worst on/near the U of IL campus.
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Old 03-09-2014, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Finland
24,268 posts, read 18,773,930 times
Reputation: 11103
If helmets becomes mandatory, I will stop biking at that moment or collect the fines. That's merely a political statement, as then the government control has gone too far. I will never wear that ugly chamberpot on my head because some retiree falls and hurts his/her head. I've biked regularly since I was 4, and never ever hurt my head. The only accidents while biking have happened when I've been drunk and even then my knees and elbows have been the victims, my chin once, but never my brain.

I could clarify this if someone takes it up: no, wearing seatbelts is not the same thing. I've been in a car accident that could've been fatal if I didn't wore seatbelt, but never been even close to a situation when I should've needed a helmet when biking. And I am careful and take preemptive measures; I don't listen to music or talk on the phone while biking. Mandatory helmets would just be a step too far. And those chamberpots are terribly inconvenient as well when not on your head.

Last edited by Ariete; 03-09-2014 at 03:02 PM..
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