U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 03-11-2014, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,066,811 times
Reputation: 12635

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
This. You need to look at fatality rate. Note that motorcyclists wear helmet, while car drivers and passengers don't.
Mot states do not require that motorcyclists wear helmets, although most of the population lives in states that do. Given, I don't get out of CA/OR/WA/NV much, all of which require helmets. I've ridden in AZ twice, both times I left my helmet on although I did see a large group of Harleys pull off to remove their helmets.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-11-2014, 10:41 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,929,314 times
Reputation: 14804
British Columbia requires bicyclists to wear helmets. The only other places in North America that require adult bicyclists to wear helmets are in Atlantic Canada:

Bicycle helmet laws in Canada

Thankfully, none of them of get hot summers (interior BC gets somewhat hot summers, but it's a dry heat). I dislike helmets heat on hot, especially humid days because it prevents cooling. Fancier helmets are better at not insulating the head.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2014, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,650,120 times
Reputation: 26646
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
British Columbia requires bicyclists to wear helmets. The only other places in North America that require adult bicyclists to wear helmets are in Atlantic Canada:

Bicycle helmet laws in Canada

Thankfully, none of them of get hot summers (interior BC gets somewhat hot summers, but it's a dry heat). I dislike helmets heat on hot, especially humid days because it prevents cooling. Fancier helmets are better at not insulating the head.
And interestingly enough, their bike share program is the least successful in North America, presumably because the people who would randomly decide to hop on the bike for a quick trip do not carry helmets in their pockets.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2014, 08:30 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,816,131 times
Reputation: 9769
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
British Columbia requires bicyclists to wear helmets. The only other places in North America that require adult bicyclists to wear helmets are in Atlantic Canada:
There are some local regulations; the Village of South Orange Township, NJ requires bicycle helmets, for instance. Probably many other municipalities do as well. I don't know if any major cities do. I don't wear a helmet when commuting; it's a pain to carry and it's hot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2014, 08:42 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,988 posts, read 102,554,590 times
Reputation: 33050
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
And interestingly enough, their bike share program is the least successful in North America, presumably because the people who would randomly decide to hop on the bike for a quick trip do not carry helmets in their pockets.
That's quite a leap to that conclusion. Some of them include helmet rentals.

Anyone who thinks helmets are unnecessary has another think coming, to put it diplomatically. I will never back down on that issue.

The Center For Head Injury Services
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/0...ype=blogs&_r=0
Brain Injuries Caused by Bicycle Accidents | LIVESTRONG.COM
89% Of Children In Bike Accidents Do Not Wear Helmets, Upping Risk Of Traumatic Brain Injuries

Sound like fun?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2014, 08:48 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,929,314 times
Reputation: 14804
Accidents to other people.

Well bicycle accidents. On a personal note, I messed up my leg (mostly foot) in a ski accident a few weeks ago. I can't walk well for any long period of time, 10 minutes is ok but not much more. But I can bicycle!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2014, 08:52 PM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,193,007 times
Reputation: 3351
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
British Columbia requires bicyclists to wear helmets. The only other places in North America that require adult bicyclists to wear helmets are in Atlantic Canada:

Bicycle helmet laws in Canada

I've spent a lot of time biking around Vancouver. I was unaware of this law and don't believe it is heavily enforced.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2014, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,650,120 times
Reputation: 26646
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
That's quite a leap to that conclusion. Some of them include helmet rentals.

Anyone who thinks helmets are unnecessary has another think coming, to put it diplomatically. I will never back down on that issue.

The Center For Head Injury Services
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/0...ype=blogs&_r=0
Brain Injuries Caused by Bicycle Accidents | LIVESTRONG.COM
89% Of Children In Bike Accidents Do Not Wear Helmets, Upping Risk Of Traumatic Brain Injuries

Sound like fun?
It showed up as an issue for adoption in both Vancouver and Melbourne.
Helmets pose challenge for Vancouver bike share program - British Columbia - CBC News

Helmet laws for adults are pretty rare around the world.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2014, 07:48 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,988 posts, read 102,554,590 times
Reputation: 33050
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Accidents to other people.

Well bicycle accidents. On a personal note, I messed up my leg (mostly foot) in a ski accident a few weeks ago. I can't walk well for any long period of time, 10 minutes is ok but not much more. But I can bicycle!
Glad you're at least somewhat OK.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
It showed up as an issue for adoption in both Vancouver and Melbourne.
Helmets pose challenge for Vancouver bike share program - British Columbia - CBC News

Helmet laws for adults are pretty rare around the world.
The law is irrelevant. Wear a helmet for your brain. And too bad about these bike programs. Maybe they should rent the helmets too. Riding a bike w/o a helmet is like driving a car w/o a seatbelt.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2014, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
1,070 posts, read 2,364,936 times
Reputation: 1420
Steering away from obvious helmet arguments, I think one of the keys to public acceptance of cycling is passive safety.

Modern protected bikeways go a long way to separate cyclists from motor vehicle traffic. This buffer space between the two modes of transport means less chance of conflict between the two, making cycling safer. The buffer effect is also more visually appealing, adding to the appearance of safety. This model falls apart at the traditional intersection, however, where the bikeway empties into traffic, in a "mixed zone". This area increases conflict between cyclists and motor vehicles. Using intersections modeled after Dutch cycleways, a traditional 4 way intersection can be retrofitted into a "protected intersection".

Protected Intersections for Bicyclists | A new design for US streets

This website simplifies the model, and does a wonderful job explaining how it works. While there is no blanket answer for all intersections, this model creates a safer intersection with much less conflict. The flow of cyclist traffic enters into a roundabout-like system. Crossings for cyclists and pedestrians are even further from motor vehicle traffic, and crossing distances are reduced. The only issue with this model is the radius of right turns. While it is successful at slowing down regular motor vehicle traffic, long vehicles (busses, semis, commercial trucks, motor vehicles towing trailers) will have a more difficult time navigating the right hand turn without clipping the curb. To prevent curb damage, the center islands could instead be comprised of a corrugated surface (think: rough brick) with large reflectors -- visible day and night, providing a visual cue for vhicles to navigate the intersection, while simultaneously creating a surface that can potentially be run over.

Having protected bikeways and protected intersections along major surface street routes through a dense urban center would defeintely boost cycle awareness, and increase capacity / use of cycles. Another factor is cycle parking. Most stores in the US either disregard cycle parking, or have one or two small bars to which people have to chain their bikes. While the responsibility would inevitably land on the business owner / property owner, expanding cycle parking (as well as making it safe, secure, and attractive) would convince more people to cycle. The same could be said for locker / shower facilities in office complexes, but one can only dream.

As for the posters earlier on that say it's too hot in Phoenix: dress for the weather, and carry water! I commute a lot by bike from Mesa (University and Dobson) to Scottsdale (Scottsdale and Thomas) multiple days a week. Most major roads in the Valley have bike lanes (although, they aren't protected). There's also wonderful paths along the numerous canals that line the Valley. Commuting to work, I go straight from my neighborhood street onto the Tempe canal path, then ride down University (dedicated bike lane) to Rural / Scottsdale (again, dedicated bike lane). While I could stay along Scottsdale all the way to Thomas, I prefer to add the extra distance and take the Scottsdale Greenbelt (for those not from Phoenix, it's a very long park that runs the length of Scottsdale. Nice, wide path, lakes, grass, tress. The greenery cools it down a bit during the summer months, making it nicer to bike down. There's also no motor vehicle traffic, making it much safer). Get off Rural after the bridge, and circle around to Tempe Town Lake. The lakeside path cuts in front of Grigio, and heads straight to the Greenbelt. When heading to my friends house in Awatukee (Baseline and 48th), I usually head south on Dobson (dedicated bike lane most of the way), then head west along the Western canal path. This path ends at the park in Tempe, then it's a short ride down Baseline. Alternatively I could cut through Guadalupe, which has much less traffic volume (though some people consider it "ghetto"). Crossing I-10 on Guad has the added benefit of not having to deal with freeway off-/on-ramps.



EDIT: First off, I seriously didn't mean to write a novel. Second, I should add -- I'm a total car nut. I love driving. However, I'm a huge advocate of cycling and public transit. Why? Two reasons. 1) If I take public transit where I need to go, I can do things like read a book or watch a movie while I commute, which is a lot more difficult when driving (it's also much cheaper than burning gas on the 101). 2) If I can convince you lot to get off the road, it means less traffic for me on days I do decide to drive!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top