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Old 02-26-2014, 01:43 AM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
7,142 posts, read 8,882,400 times
Reputation: 7732

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
That could be workable for residential side streets, I wouldn't mind the street I live on have a 10 mph speed limit, well 15 mph, and possibly go then. Only a couple blocks till I'm a bigger road, so the speed loss is minimal.
You wouldn't mind it, until you got caught violating it, like the woman in this video. Everybody wants lower speed limits in their neighborhood, and nobody wants to obey the speed limit.

"When residents complain about speeders, guess who often gets caught speeding? If you say the residents, you are 100% correct."


Unofficial Signs - People Behaving Badly - YouTube
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Old 02-26-2014, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,523,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
There is a point where you are just going too slow and 15MPH is very slow. Chicago's Speed limit is 30MPH unless otherwise posted. Now to be blunt going 30MPG down an alley isn't a good move but on the street traffic usually is the more limiting factor about speed. I can not imagine driving 15MPH unless there is one heck of a crowd or something besides signs slowing me down. I have yet to see a crowed cross walk become much of an issue but frankly if I had my way I would ban bicycles. Less because I hate them and more because they tend to be reckless(doing things like running a light when no traffic is present) and there really isn't enough room on most streets for them to travel without risking being hit by moving traffic on one side or running into an parked car's door on the other.
Driving in downtown Portland isn't an issue and you are going 12.5mph due to the timing of the lights, it is very easy driving through downtown and makes it easy for you to pay attention to the pedestrians and bikers around you in downtown.

I take issue with you wanting to ban bicycles because you don't want to ban cars for the same reasons. I see cars running red lights all the time, I see cars speeding all the time, I see reckless drivers weaving in and out of lanes just to get a couple car lengths ahead. Yet you seem to have no problem with that?
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Old 02-26-2014, 07:48 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That all depends on where one is driving. In Philadelphia it wouldn't make sense to drive over 15mph through downtown or many of the old neighborhoods, which they all have four way stop signs at each intersection. But a downtown like Phoenix probably isn't a big deal to drive 35 mph in it.

It all depends on how an area is designed, personally I prefer the area with the slower speeds because it makes it easier to pay attention to crowded crosswalks and people on bikes riding on the streets.

Also the moment a car is in motion, even at a couple miles per hour, it is still very easy to maneuver the vehicle.
I don't think it's possible to drive much more than 15, maybe at the outside 20 mph on most downtown Denver streets. I'm talking the hard-core downtown, not the dt residential neighborhoods, or "Uptown", Capital Hill, etc. You can drive faster on Colfax (which isn't quite downtown) and on Speer Blvd, which goes through downtown.

I don't think you understand cars very well. It's hard to stop on a dime. It's much harder to maneuver a vehicle than it is to maneuver a bike, or one's feet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KaaBoom View Post
You wouldn't mind it, until you got caught violating it, like the woman in this video. Everybody wants lower speed limits in their neighborhood, and nobody wants to obey the speed limit.

"When residents complain about speeders, guess who often gets caught speeding? If you say the residents, you are 100% correct."


Unofficial Signs - People Behaving Badly - YouTube
Oh, yes, that's what a cop told me once 30 years or so ago when I complained about the speeding on my street. He (?) also said it's usually the same two or three people that do it.
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Old 02-26-2014, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,523,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I don't think it's possible to drive much more than 15, maybe at the outside 20 mph on most downtown Denver streets. I'm talking the hard-core downtown, not the dt residential neighborhoods, or "Uptown", Capital Hill, etc. You can drive faster on Colfax (which isn't quite downtown) and on Speer Blvd, which goes through downtown.

I don't think you understand cars very well. It's hard to stop on a dime. It's much harder to maneuver a vehicle than it is to maneuver a bike, or one's feet.



Oh, yes, that's what a cop told me once 30 years or so ago when I complained about the speeding on my street. He (?) also said it's usually the same two or three people that do it.
I think you misread my post, I am in favor of lower speed limits in downtowns and areas that have a high amount of pedestrians because it is easier to stop a vehicle when doing under 15mph than it is when doing over 30mph. The comment I was responding to was someone trying to claim that it was hard to maneuver a car at low speeds which is incorrect, the moment the wheels on a car are moving it is relatively easy to maneuver a vehicle.
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Old 02-26-2014, 08:06 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I think you misread my post, I am in favor of lower speed limits in downtowns and areas that have a high amount of pedestrians because it is easier to stop a vehicle when doing under 15mph than it is when doing over 30mph. The comment I was responding to was someone trying to claim that it was hard to maneuver a car at low speeds which is incorrect, the moment the wheels on a car are moving it is relatively easy to maneuver a vehicle.
That is what I am disagreeing with. You're talking about maneuvering a 2000# vehicle! It may be "easy", but it's not quick.
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Old 02-26-2014, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,523,816 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
That is what I am disagreeing with. You're talking about maneuvering a 2000# vehicle! It may be "easy", but it's not quick.
Why would someone want to drive over 30mph through a pedestrian heavy downtown?
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Old 02-26-2014, 08:22 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Why would someone want to drive over 30mph through a pedestrian heavy downtown?
To get where they're going. The streets I named, Colfax and Speer, are arterials. I don't recall what the exact speed limit is on either, probably 25-30 mph. The actual speed through the most congested part is probably much lower.
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Old 02-26-2014, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,523,816 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
To get where they're going. The streets I named, Colfax and Speer, are arterials. I don't recall what the exact speed limit is on either, probably 25-30 mph. The actual speed through the most congested part is probably much lower.
Typically these areas are easy to get around if you don't need to go through them and the routes around tend to have those higher speed limits. I am sure you wouldn't drive through downtown Denver if you needed to get to some place on the other side of downtown.

There is no reason to have high speeds in high pedestrian areas.
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Old 02-26-2014, 08:50 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,006 posts, read 102,606,536 times
Reputation: 33064
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Typically these areas are easy to get around if you don't need to go through them and the routes around tend to have those higher speed limits. I am sure you wouldn't drive through downtown Denver if you needed to get to some place on the other side of downtown.

There is no reason to have high speeds in high pedestrian areas.
Isn't all of downtown a high pedestrian area? Well, actually, the streets I referenced ARE NOT as pedestrian-heavy as some others. To put it diplomatically, you have a severe knowledge deficit in the area you are trying to discuss.
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Old 02-26-2014, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,170 posts, read 29,674,744 times
Reputation: 26661
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Isn't all of downtown a high pedestrian area? Well, actually, the streets I referenced ARE NOT as pedestrian-heavy as some others. To put it diplomatically, you have a severe knowledge deficit in the area you are trying to discuss.
15mph would be too slow for much of my downtown. Plenty of blocks with no foot traffic.
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