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Old 02-28-2014, 11:03 AM
 
994 posts, read 1,267,639 times
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Why not move to a city like Denver or Seattle? I've lived in both, and I can tell you that there are neighborhoods you can live in which are certainly part of the "core" of the city but aren't ghettos or products of gentrification.

In other words, consider moving to a city that is predominantly white. Since cities always attract diversity, you'll still get to appreciate different cultures and financial circumstances - just in smaller, more contained doses. Sounds to me like that's low-key what you're asking for.
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Old 02-28-2014, 11:10 AM
 
770 posts, read 932,136 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjg5 View Post
Increased rents and property taxes.

In my old nabe in the Bronx, it was the white population that was pushed out--not by private dollars driving up the cost of living and property values, rather it was a very misguided social and public housing policy that destroyed many stable working class nabes. Where is the outcry over that? It is so ironic that many minorites are whining about gentrification - the reverse of white flight of my youth - and expect many to share their outrage. Spike Lee can take a hike and get over it.
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Old 02-28-2014, 11:31 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,363 posts, read 59,787,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Webster Ave Guy View Post
It is so ironic that many minorites are whining about gentrification - the reverse of white flight of my youth - and expect many to share their outrage.
Why would one assume that minorities are the only people being adversely affected by gentrification?
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Old 02-28-2014, 11:45 AM
 
770 posts, read 932,136 times
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Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Why would one assume that minorities are the only people being adversely affected by gentrification?
Look at the demographics. Please understand that instead of destroying neighborhoods like many have seen in Detroit, the Bronx, Oakland, gentrifiers BRING value instead of taking it away.
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Old 02-28-2014, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,164 posts, read 29,645,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Webster Ave Guy View Post
Look at the demographics. Please understand that instead of destroying neighborhoods like many have seen in Detroit, the Bronx, Oakland, gentrifiers BRING value instead of taking it away.
No, not exactly. What happens is the cities decided to ignore the existing value until the "gentrifiers came."
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Old 02-28-2014, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,893 posts, read 7,652,237 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Webster Ave Guy View Post
Look at the demographics. Please understand that instead of destroying neighborhoods like many have seen in Detroit, the Bronx, Oakland, gentrifiers BRING value instead of taking it away.
But this is assuming that the neighborhood that's there has less value (and I don't mean just monetary value) than the gentrified neighborhood.

This is why I like to make the distinction between gentrification and revitalization. If a neighborhood is made up of nothing but slumlords with transient renters, (or just abandoned homes/buildings) then there's little or nothing--culturally--to be lost or displaced by revitalization. But, gentrification displaces one group of people and their culture (maybe African-American, maybe Hispanic, maybe even Italian) with a wealthier group of people and their different culture.
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Old 02-28-2014, 12:47 PM
 
26,585 posts, read 52,247,863 times
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Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
It is very interesting how uneven the crime reporting in the Bay Area is. Sorry to burst everyone's bubble in the thread, but SF severely under reports its crime in the main media sources, while simultaneously reporting most crimes in Oakland. I.E. a non-fatal shooting in Oakland will be a headlong story, but a similar incident in SF is buried in the news briefs...maybe. More like only reported in one of the indie papers.

There is this perception that "no one in Oakland cares about crime." That isn't the case at all. But the news never covers the crimes that don't happen. Or the quite pockets where criminals aren't welcome.
This is very true... I get the Oakland and SF newspaper.
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Old 02-28-2014, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Chicago
3,391 posts, read 3,736,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tjb122982 View Post
I wanted to get feedback from fellow progressives and liberals on the issue of gentrification. I'm graduating from college at the end of the year and I'm looking at different cities that I can move to. All things being equal, I would rather live in the urban core compared to the burbs. I do not inspire to be a yuppie but I may be a little too mainstream to be a hipster. All of this boils down to how do I address the issue of gentrification; specifically, how do I be apart of the solution instead of being part of the problem without living in a place where I would fear getting mugged?
Certain individuals moving to the urban core isn't what ultimately drives gentrification. What ultimately drives gentrification is a certain pattern of private investment, usually heavily subsidized by taxpayer dollars. Blaming yuppies or hipsters for gentrification is like blaming the common foot soldier for a war. They are just pawns in a larger game.

Live where you like. But when you get there, regard the people around you as neighbors, rather than a "bad element" that needs to be purged. Don't view every new "upscale" business as an "improvement" in the neighborhood. Understand that what is best for you or your social set may not be what is best for the neighborhood as a whole. If you're already worried about getting mugged, you probably have a lot to learn about what living in a city is really like.
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Old 02-28-2014, 01:12 PM
 
26,585 posts, read 52,247,863 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
This. All day.

I like most of my neighbors - there are 2 households on our block that are trouble but everyone else is cool - but at least half of them talk about selling out and moving to the suburbs. Most of them are 1st generation immigrants and as much as I try it's hard to get across to them that the places they talk about moving to are in decline (inner-ring suburbs in Delaware County) while the neighborhood they already live in is on the upswing. They don't see it or don't care. They just want that "american dream".

*There are a few apartments on my block over the corner stores but almost everyone else owns their house.
I’ve experienced this first hand in the Oakland neighborhood where I bought my second home. It really wasn’t called Gentrification until the last 5 years after the Real Estate crash.

In the 80's... my neighborhood was a mix of about 50% white that owned for 40 or 50 years and 50% African Americans from the 70’s.

In the 90's... the older white homeowners passed away or moved to retirement homes... every home sold was bought by first generation Asian families and this also included African American families that moved to new homes within an hours drive.

In the 2000's every home sold was bought by Spanish speaking families... by this time, all of the African American homeowners sold and none of the old time white families were left.

Then the crash came and everyone that bought in the 2000's... almost all Spanish speaking walked away.

Since the crash, every home has been bought by white or mixed families as owner occupants.

In 30 years the neighborhood went from 50/50 black/white to mostly Asian to mostly Hispanic and now is mostly white with a few Asians in the mix.

These families are/were all homeowners...

Only one African American family remains…

It really is fascinating how things change.

The old white families... mostly widows, kept yards looking like parks... not so much so for others that followed... I talked to my Asian neighbors about it and was told they spend money on the inside of the house and not the outside...

Interesting things happened when the Spanish speaking families moved in... every weekend work parties sprouted up... all the new homeowners had many connections in the building trades... neglected landscaping was enhanced with paver stones and wrought iron work... roofs were replaced as well as windows and painting. The neighborhood was really looking nice.

As a group... they really did much to improve the housing stock... sad to see them go. The only downside is parking was tight… larger families with more cars.

Now, the new young families are almost San Francisco expats that saw a chance to own their own home in the SF Bay Area and jumped in... about half are mixed race or white.
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Old 02-28-2014, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Oakland, California
313 posts, read 410,212 times
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I moved to Oakland, CA 7 years ago. I've lived in pretty rough areas of this city. It has been extremely inexpensive for me (I've never paid more than $375 a month for rent)

I've had a (shared with 5 strangers) house broken into twice. Nothing was stolen from me because I always kept a padlock on my bedroom door. My car window has been smashed twice, nothing stolen. Presumably a crackhead looking for drugs or money.

I love this city, I'd never want to live anywhere else. I have always known my neighbors (even the ones who were squatters, and the pimp and prostitutes, best neighbors ever) and they've always been nice, friendly, clean, community-oriented people.

I grew up in a suburb in Massachusetts, but I've never felt so at home as I have in Oakland. The diversity is amazing, and things are generally really inexpensive in terms of food, car repair, oil changes, gas, stuff like that. I don't really know why you're worried about gentrifying a neighborhood, unless you're actually rich. I can't afford to move into San Francisco or any city that will charge me more than $400 a month in rent, so I relate to my neighbors. I'm not some rich person with a 6 figure salary trying to "make it in the hood" If you have money and move into a poor neighborhood, everyone will know and you will absolutely become a target beyond the general crime that happens like car windows getting smashed or someone camping out in your back yard or trying to take a bath in your house because they're homeless. I don't really know why a rich person would want to put themselves in that position.
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