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Old 02-27-2014, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,269 posts, read 26,269,309 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Golden Corral? Never heard of it until this forum. There's not a single one in downstate NY and only one in Massachusetts. I can think of several people from my high school taht don't fit the stereotype who moved to the city.
That don't fit the Golden Corral, K-Mart, Icehouse "stereotype"? Of course, the people who don't fit that sterotype move to the city. You must be talking about people who fit the SWPL "stereotype" (I don't think it's a stereotype so much as it is based on actual research that's become quite valuable to retailers and political campaigns).

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Last sentence could rural and small town New England. Isn't the Subaru the offical car of New England?
Rural New England in some ways is as SWPL as you can get. People have a different perception of rural New England than do of, say, rural Georgia. Being SWPL doesn't mean you must live in a city. It's just SWPLs that embrace the urban lifestyle.
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Old 02-27-2014, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,698,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post


I'm not talking "demographics" like race and age. There tends to be clear and hard class lines in major cities reflected in shopping trends. If you showed me someone who shops at K-Mart regularly, eats at Golden Corral or any other buffet bar, drives a Chevy Tahoe, prefers Icehouse and bowls at least once a month, then I'd bet the house that person does not live in a hip, walkable urban area. Those are all things seen as low class by most urbanists
Who says the walkable place has to be hip and urban. We used to have main streets in towns of all sizes that were decidedly not hip or urban. But there were still walkable.

My grandma who lived in a very rural community could still walk to a lot of her daily/weekly needs. Most of the homes were trailers and mobile homes.

Walkable and urban aren't the same thing. You can be walkable without being urban. And urban without being walkable.
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Old 02-27-2014, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,269 posts, read 26,269,309 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Who says the walkable place has to be hip and urban. We used to have main streets in towns of all sizes that were decidedly not hip or urban. But there were still walkable.

My grandma who lived in a very rural community could still walk to a lot of her daily/weekly needs. Most of the homes were trailers and mobile homes.

Walkable and urban aren't the same thing. You can be walkable without being urban. And urban without being walkable.
Because in the United States, most people aren't moving to rural areas to find walkable neighborhoods. They are moving to cities and walkable suburbs.

It's at least good to know that many of the urbanists priced out of Lower Manhattan and Williamsburg can seek refuge in North Carolina's trailer parks.
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Old 02-27-2014, 03:50 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
It's at least good to know that many of the urbanists priced out of Lower Manhattan and Williamsburg can seek refuge in North Carolina's trailer parks.
A few do move to my town, and a number of towns in New England. I can walk to farm fields.
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Old 02-27-2014, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
A few do move to my town, and a number of towns in New England. I can walk to farm fields.
Well, you can never really argue with the existence of "a few," can you?
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Old 02-27-2014, 03:58 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,991 posts, read 42,018,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Well, you can never really argue with the existence of "a few," can you?
The towns I listed don't really count as typical rural areas, either. Definitely not trailer park country. But there is some movement city people who have certain demographic charecteristics to SWPL moving to certain "hip" rural areas.
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Old 02-27-2014, 03:59 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,991 posts, read 42,018,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
We used to have main streets in towns of all sizes that were decidedly not hip or urban. But there were still walkable.
And there are still plenty. It looks like it has few pedestrians, but it was full of them when I was there. Mostly a poor hispanic population:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Haver...2,6.34,,0,6.68
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Old 02-27-2014, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,550,732 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Because in the United States, most people aren't moving to rural areas to find walkable neighborhoods. They are moving to cities and walkable suburbs.

It's at least good to know that many of the urbanists priced out of Lower Manhattan and Williamsburg can seek refuge in North Carolina's trailer parks.
There are actually some nice small and medium size cities in North Carolina.
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Old 02-27-2014, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,698,541 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Because in the United States, most people aren't moving to rural areas to find walkable neighborhoods. They are moving to cities and walkable suburbs.

It's at least good to know that many of the urbanists priced out of Lower Manhattan and Williamsburg can seek refuge in North Carolina's trailer parks.
Or you can move to a suburb and find the walkability you crave, perhaps packaged with good schools. All of our burbs, or most are working on getting more walkable in parts.

It isn't either or. One of the most hopping downtowns in the Bay Area is walnut creek. A sprawling suburb, but the downtown is rally good. And there are even quite a few housing choices nearby. They need to work on street width and car speed but it is about a B on the walkable scale.

Ps. My grandmas neighborhood isn't a trailer park. More like a place where people settled at all different points. Some single family homes. A 150 year old church and some newer homes too. But it is a very small community. It is still called a community actually.
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Old 02-27-2014, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,269 posts, read 26,269,309 times
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BTW, nobody answered my question (perhaps that's because the answer would be "No"?). Any fiscal conservatives on this Board? Social conservatives? Vote for Bush, McCain or Romney?

Anybody shop at a Wal-Mart in the last month?

Anybody eat at buffet bar in the last month?

Anybody's kids involved in the Scouts?

Anybody drive an SUV (or want to drive one)?

Anyone buy anything from QVC in the last year?
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