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Old 03-01-2014, 08:17 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Yeah, there are still some small scale designers that have manufacturing places in Manhattan. There are also some small scale Asian clothing makers of some sort. I have seen a few of them when walking around, such a weird thing to see when walking around in Manhattan.
60 years ago, it would have been normal:



from the mid 50s. Unclear where, though the label says Garment District, so in Midtown Manhattan.

File:Garment District NYWTS crop.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 03-01-2014, 11:05 PM
 
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The reason, is Cost To Do Business, which reflects on the ability to sell goods in a competitive marketplace. It is estimated, that the cost to do business in Los Angeles is 40% higher than it is in Dallas Texas as an example. That is exactly the reason Apple is building the new billion dollar facility to bring computer manufacturing back to the U.S. in Texas not California.

That 40 percent, can be profit paid to stock holders. It can be to hire more workers and produce more goods at a competitive price. It can be used to increase the size of the facility, and produce more goods. It can be to lower the price to be more competitive. It is most often used as a combination all of these alternatives.

Cities with the higher costs to do business, and other problems, are the reason they are driving factories to more rural locations. Another is that taxes on business are so much higher in places like Los Angeles, which is a big factor.

A company would have to have very stupid board members, to build factories in the major cities today, as the goods would cost so much more to produce they would have to raise prices to where they cannot be competitive.
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Old 03-02-2014, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Ha, ha! While I actually agree with you (shocking! ), I think it's funny. Yeah, a lot of urbanists wouldn't like looking at a steel mill, a meat-packing plant, even a computer manufacturer like the old Storage Tech in Louisville.
Our former factories (we really don't have many left) are actually pretty coveted. Most are in brick buildings, and since that sort of masonry is banned from construction now inmost of CA, they have novelty appeal. They are turning into lofts left and right.

The factories that are left in Oakland are generally on the west side and isolated by freeways and train tracks. Unfortunately, some genius decided to make the main bike thoroughfare for that side of Oakland on one of those big streets with tons of truck traffic and freeway ramps etc. it is very dangerous, and a cyclist recently got hit by a truck and died (all evidence points to it being the truck drivers fault, this cyclist was a very safe rider used tons of lights and was really experienced.). .

I don't get it, considering that part of town is a grid, and there are plenty of quiet streets nearby.

I don't think large scale factories are well suited for residential areas. But smaller ones could be incorporated safely.
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Old 03-02-2014, 07:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
60 years ago, it would have been normal:



from the mid 50s. Unclear where, though the label says Garment District, so in Midtown Manhattan.

File:Garment District NYWTS crop.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Interesting there is a big sign for a shoe repair shop. Shoe repair is almost a lost art today.
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Old 03-02-2014, 09:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Interesting there is a big sign for a shoe repair shop. Shoe repair is almost a lost art today.
Believe it or not, Tony's Shoe Repair is still there. Not sure if it's the same Tony, or even the same shop. But it's about the right place -- Sterns Shoe Mart was at 204 West 35th (near 7th avenue), and Tony's is at 208. A barber shop is still in near the same place, and a bar (not the same one).

http://goo.gl/maps/2xnYR
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Old 03-02-2014, 11:56 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Believe it or not, Tony's Shoe Repair is still there. Not sure if it's the same Tony, or even the same shop. But it's about the right place -- Sterns Shoe Mart was at 204 West 35th (near 7th avenue), and Tony's is at 208. A barber shop is still in near the same place, and a bar (not the same one).

http://goo.gl/maps/2xnYR
We have several shoe repairs in my neighborhood and the neighboring one too. But the funniest "shoe repair" is not about shoes at all. There is a pizza place that opened in a former shoe repair shop. They kept the sign and it is called boot and shoe service. So when you tell people you are going to boot and shoe they look at you like you are crazy.
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Old 03-04-2014, 09:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
Yeah, I know I already have a thread on factories in an urban environment, so consider this a spin-off thread. Why are industrial facilities, such as meat packing plants or automobile factories, so often built in suburbs or in the country in sprawling complexes, rather than being built in compact multi-story facilities in the city? What changed and caused this new trend of suburban industrialization?
Generally, they aren't built in the "suburbs"--they are built in undeveloped land outside of the city, often initially because regulations about zoning and pollution discouraged putting smelly, smoky facilities in city centers. Suburbs ended up following the jobs out into the country.

However, before either factory relocation or suburbanization is possible, there has to be transportation. Until the 1950s (meaning the era before 1950, just to clarify) most long distance transportation of goods was by rail, which means factories had to be located near railroads. Even small facilities had a railroad spur, or were located close enough to a railroad line to carry goods to a nearby "team track" by truck or wagon. Factories were also generally labor-intensive, so they had to be near a large source of workers, who generally didn't own cars. That made cities the logical place for industry. And because land was expensive in cities, the industries tended to be vertical, rather than horizontal, to make the most use out of the least land. Streetcar suburbs spread this pattern out a bit, but still retained a basically rail/pedestrian oriented structure--it just meant you could set up little "downtowns" away from the urban core. If the suburb was bankrolled by a combine that also owned an electric railroad and an electric utility, they could make a lot of money selling land to the factory owners and workers, selling electricity to both to power homes and factories, and selling rides for both workers and products in and out. That's how the interurbans of Los Angeles were built, along with many Midwestern interurban networks in Ohio, Indiana and Illinois.

Public highways changed this industrial dynamic. With government-funded highways criss-crossing the country, leading from old downtown cores into greenfield areas, it was much easier to relocate a factory to more remote areas. Larger facilities still needed railroad access, so they would often concentrate where railroad lines and highways crossed, but many could be served by trucks, and with increasing worker affluence following World War II (thanks to unionization) more workers could afford cars to drive to work. And where the industries led, suburbs followed--although not too closely, leaving lots of buffer space between the job areas, shopping areas and residential areas. Typically, though, all three were closer than downtown--which is part of why downtowns started to die during this era. Having been replaced in all three roles, there was no longer a reason to visit downtown for a suburban resident.
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Old 03-04-2014, 12:14 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
With government-funded highways criss-crossing the country, leading from old downtown cores into greenfield areas, it was much easier to relocate a factory to more remote areas.
If I read one more word implying that there were no government funded highways before 1950, I'm going to go on a rampage! To put it bluntly, that's bulls***!

ETA: Don't forget the subsidized railroads, either.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 03-04-2014 at 12:29 PM..
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Old 03-04-2014, 02:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
If I read one more word implying that there were no government funded highways before 1950, I'm going to go on a rampage! To put it bluntly, that's bulls***!

ETA: Don't forget the subsidized railroads, either.
No, I think he just means something like the interstates. Route 66(which I was surprised to learn I once lived near) is nothing like say I290(which is the modern way a person leaving Chicago' downtown heading west would go). It has no lights, no cross streets, faster speed limits and just isn't much comparable to what went before.
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Old 03-04-2014, 02:22 PM
 
Location: The City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
If I read one more word implying that there were no government funded highways before 1950, I'm going to go on a rampage! To put it bluntly, that's bulls***!

ETA: Don't forget the subsidized railroads, either.
Do you suggest that this did not make this possible?

And truly highways constrution did not ramp up until after WWII - there is really no way to deny that

Levittown PA would not have existed without Highway One which also helped serve the massive (now defunct brownfield) Fairless Steel Works



Now I conider myself a realist but do you honestly suggest that the development of these highways didn not dramatically impact/alter development patterns that existed for 100's of years prior?
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