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Old 03-08-2014, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,652,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
@ AJNEOA: Actually, my experience living in residential neighborhoods in Pittsburgh and Denver is that it's pretty quiet most of the time, similar to the suburbs. That's the reality. But good grief, I've seen people post that they thrive on all the city noise, couldn't STAND living in the burbs b/c it's too quiet, etc.
Everyone is different, when I was younger and single, I enjoyed being on the edge of downtown Portland and being able to walk to the bars or take cab rides for cheap so I wasn't drinking and driving, but moving back I will prefer a little bit quieter of an area that still has commercial main streets that are in walking or biking distance.
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Old 03-08-2014, 06:42 PM
 
261 posts, read 334,416 times
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The long term benefits to the city of having an interstate run thru it far out weigh the inconveniences of constructing that interstate.

A town without an interstate is a town left behind.
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Old 03-08-2014, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post

And I would disagree. There are plenty of sidewalkless suburbs in the Northeast, but there are plenty of suburbs with sidewalks in the Northeast. From what I remember, most of your experience of Northeastern suburbs are of Pittsburgh or upstate New York, which aren't reflective of the entire Northeast. (Over half the population is concentrated near the coast, which is built up differently in many ways.) About half of Long Island has sidewalks nearly everywhere, and in the rest the usual is that sidewalks are only omitted on smaller residential streets. Same is true in many north Jersey suburbs, and Philly ones (from what kidphilly said). Boston is a mix, but again further out the smallest streets skip sidewalks. The Pittsburgh pattern of even pre-World War II suburbs lacking sidewalks sounds odd to me, I haven't seen much of that.

Of the southeastern US, I have little personal experience, but from what I've heard and seen from the internet, sidewalks were much less common there than any other part of the US. Even many city propers have streets that lack sidewalks.
Well, I have been to other places in the NE besides Pittsburgh and Albany. I've also lived in Wilmington, DE, though I can't remember if the burbs there had sidewalks or not. We didn't live in a traditional suburb, nor did we live in the city there. But I've been around a bit. My BFF lives in the DC burbs of VA, there are no sidewalks in her subdivision. So let's say, sidewalks are less common in the NE. It always cracks me up when someone posts some picture of the west, including parts of Nevada, Utah, Arizona and California (all of which have been posted), carrying on about "sprawl", only to see sidewalks everywhere.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 03-08-2014 at 08:09 PM..
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Old 03-08-2014, 07:27 PM
 
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A lot of cities are starting to leave behind their interstates, preferring access to their waterfront and reclamation of valuable downtown land instead.
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Old 03-08-2014, 07:42 PM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,203,848 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
It always cracks me up when someone posts some picture of the west, including parts of Nevada, Utah, Arizona and California (all of which have been posted), carrying on about "sprawl", only to see sidewalks everywhere.
Why?
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Old 03-08-2014, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Why?
Because they are supposedly examples of major "car dependency".
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Old 03-08-2014, 08:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Because they are supposedly examples of major "car dependency".
Sidewalks are examples of car dependency? Why would you say that?
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Old 03-08-2014, 08:14 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,608,777 times
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The presence of sidewalks does not preclude sprawl. The retail "power centers" in the new parts of my city technically have sidewalks, but they are all on the outer edges of huge parking lots and adjacent to busy h8gh speed streets with many curb cuts. So it's a very inhospitable place to walk, even if there is technically a sidewalk.
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Old 03-08-2014, 08:27 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Sidewalks say little about car dependency. There could be little or nothing besides other houses in walking distance.
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Old 03-08-2014, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,170 posts, read 29,808,315 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
So let's say, sidewalks are less common in the NE. It always cracks me up when someone posts some picture of the west, including parts of Nevada, Utah, Arizona and California (all of which have been posted), carrying on about "sprawl", only to see sidewalks everywhere.
You can have sidewalks and sprawl at the same time. San Jose is a great example of this. There are sidewalks everywhere,but nobody wants to walk on the Lawrence expressway when strip malls are 1 mile apart.
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