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Old 03-10-2014, 03:59 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The political establishment in many northern US cities was heavily "ethnic white" by the 1940s.

Fiorello H. La Guardia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Boston [city proper, not suburbs] would be dominanted by "ethnic whites" after the first couple decades of the 20th century. It even had a mayor that gave speeches with anti-WASP speeches to increase his popular appeal.
Definitely Pittsburgh! (Not so much the anti-WASP speeches, aren't too many WASPs in Pittsburgh!)

Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
The problem is, a lot of common military equipment (like a Patton on a "dragon wagon" would not fit under a standard highway underpass. And I'm not sure how highways could function as obstacles to tracked vehicles if they were designed to move our military vehicles around--when we invaded Germany, autobahns sped our own military vehicles' advance. Generally, this military purpose was never used nor integrated into the design of highways--military material was still mostly moved by rail or aircraft.

But for some reason the "perk" became the primary purpose? Not so sure about that.

I didn't argue for it 100%--it was a beneficial side effect from the point of view of most city governments and chambers of commerce, not the primary purpose. There were other ways to get rid of nonwhite neighborhoods, like eminent domain and redevelopment. And poor whites were considered just as expendable as poor blacks (or poor Mexicans, Japanese, Chinese, etc), so the elimination of poor white neighborhoods isn't much of an argument against the use of highways to relocate undesirable neighborhoods...also, there was a time when ethnic whites, from Italians to Irish, weren't considered "white." Also note that, technically, the standard was called "blight," which was a term meant to describe, not slums, but neighborhoods likely to become slums. One of the determining factors was close proximity to nonwhite neighborhoods. So a poor Jewish or Polish community that was near a growing Black neighborhood might be considered "blighted" as it was the most likely place where the nonwhite population would expand.
Benjamin Franklin considered the Swedes "swarthy". Shows you what he knew, though he (like many here on CD) thought he knew everything.

But nice way to move the goalposts of your conspiracy theory (Agenda 21 anyone?) by including poor whites. And please provide some documentation (NOT from Atlantic Cities or any advocacy rag) of the underlined.
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Old 03-10-2014, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
7,142 posts, read 8,874,211 times
Reputation: 7732
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJNEOA View Post
Neither option is very appealing to me, but I guess if I have to choose, I'd choose option two. Since I'm not much into climbing over a 20 foot wall, and playing real life Froger across six lanes of freeway traffic.
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Old 03-10-2014, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
7,142 posts, read 8,874,211 times
Reputation: 7732
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
The idyllic picture Kaboom posted is simply a photo. That's what I was talking about. I don't think it's representative of the railroad tracks in that area. I was not being snarky (for once)!
The image that I posted is a streetview of the railroad crossing at 48th and Lincoln. Thats in the heart of Globeville. The other images posted are of places outside of Globeville. The map link you posted is the rail yards down by the river. Thats on the edge of Globeville. Nobody would really need to walk there anyway, except to get to the river. I believe my image is more representative of railroad tracks in that area.

Last edited by KaaBoom; 03-10-2014 at 04:38 PM..
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Old 03-10-2014, 04:36 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by KaaBoom View Post
The image that I posted is a streetview of the railroad crossing at 48th and Lincoln. Thats in the heart of Globeville. The other images and map links being posted are of places outside of Globeville. I believe my image is representative of railroad tracks in that area. Do you want be to post more? They will all look pretty much the same. Single tracks, not even any warning lights.
I guess the huge collection of tracks is just east of "Globeville" proper, my mistake. But good grief, I-25 was built in 1958, 56 years ago. People born that year are now senior citizens. I-70 was built 50 years ago. I said earlier, I can't defend it, but good grief, maybe in all this time they could have figured out how to unify the neighborhood despite the freaking highway!
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Old 03-10-2014, 04:41 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,875 posts, read 42,085,992 times
Reputation: 43276
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I guess the huge collection of tracks is just east of "Globeville" proper, my mistake. But good grief, I-25 was built in 1958, 56 years ago. People born that year are now senior citizens. I-70 was built 50 years ago. I said earlier, I can't defend it, but good grief, maybe in all this time they could have figured out how to unify the neighborhood despite the freaking highway!
I was born in 1954 and am not a senior citizen. Yet.

Kat, I think what we're sort of working against is that many of the posters don't realize that a lot of these roads which they don't like for various reasons, were designed and built decades a go (as you noted about I 25). The concern for neighborhoods or walkability wasn't present then. The main idea, because many of the roads were built for national defense reasons, was to build the quickest and cheapest route between Points A and B.
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Old 03-10-2014, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
7,142 posts, read 8,874,211 times
Reputation: 7732
For the record, here is the boundaries of Globeville. I think most people should be able to see that Globeville's problem is freeways, not railroad tracks. The tracks are around the edges of the neighborhood. The interstates cut right through the middle.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Globe...orado&t=m&z=14
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Old 03-10-2014, 04:48 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
I was born in 1954 and am not a senior citizen. Yet.

Kat, I think what we're sort of working against is that many of the posters don't realize that a lot of these roads which they don't like for various reasons, were designed and built decades a go (as you noted about I 25). The concern for neighborhoods or walkability wasn't present then. The main idea, because many of the roads were built for national defense reasons, was to build the quickest and cheapest route between Points A and B.
Hey, I'm older than you! But yeah, these whippersnappers look at everything with 20/20 hindsight.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 03-10-2014 at 04:57 PM..
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Old 03-10-2014, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
7,142 posts, read 8,874,211 times
Reputation: 7732
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I guess the huge collection of tracks is just east of "Globeville" proper, my mistake. But good grief, I-25 was built in 1958, 56 years ago. People born that year are now senior citizens. I-70 was built 50 years ago. I said earlier, I can't defend it, but good grief, maybe in all this time they could have figured out how to unify the neighborhood despite the freaking highway!
How do you unify a neighborhood divided with 20 foot high walls?
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Old 03-10-2014, 04:57 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by KaaBoom View Post
How do you unify a neighborhood divided with 20 foot high walls?
There are some underpasses and overpasses there. It's not like the neighborhood is entirely cut off from the rest of the city.
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Old 03-10-2014, 05:06 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,556,250 times
Reputation: 4048
Of course, the neighborhood should just naturally regenerate, the same way that people's legs grow back after they are amputated!

Last edited by nei; 03-10-2014 at 06:24 PM..
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