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Old 03-25-2014, 04:45 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Caltrain isn't delayed as often as the local Amtrak is by "train congestion." but it does happen. Amtrak ride to Sacramento/Stockton from the Bay can be impacted, as they do share tracks. It is usually 10 minutes or less.
Caltrain is owned by a government body so I don't think freight has priority, it's just management mishaps:

Caltrain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The LIRR is impacted by "train congestion" at times, but it's mostly from other LIRR lines, particularly in the shared trunk line from Penn Station going eastward, where peak train frequency is higher than BART, though with double the tunnels.
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Old 03-25-2014, 05:47 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I didn't say it wasn't.



I've ridden that train, I didn't listen to article yet but I remember it being considered one of the more reliable train. It was a neat trip. I'll try to listen later. I'm guessing the change is added freight use in North Dakota.

As for rail reliability, long-distance Amtrak trains are affected by things that don't affect typical rail riders: and long-distance Amtrak trains are a tiny portion of American rail ridership.
Supposedly it has the lowest on-time record in the US.
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Old 03-25-2014, 07:21 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Supposedly it has the lowest on-time record in the US.
Here's a written version of perhaps the same article:

Amtrak Fights Big Oil For Use Of The Rails : NPR

It's the most ridden long-distance (overnight?) Amtrak line in the country. I think the delays are rather recent. I remember it was popular for people going to Glacier National Park, among other destinations.
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Old 03-25-2014, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Richmond/Philadelphia/Brooklyn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Is it possible some of it could be a shift from bus to rail?
Possibly, although I believe many of the new riders might not necessarily be former bus riders, as Light rail tends to be more appealing to certain higher socioeconomic groups than the bus may be.
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Old 03-29-2014, 12:23 PM
 
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that is not what the Japanese study in their hopes for selling mass transit system in US showed. They stated that only mass transits train system in US that was economically feasible is between Baltimore and Washington that they were willing to pay for a demo. They also stated that up the east cost could survive as funding goes to nay extent. But they say economic conditions even makes those not feasible to pursue.The most cost effective is from burbs to cities but even that needs a lot of public funds which is not likely since federal transfers are dying off.Just funding existing transport infrastructure is a huge problem and largely funded by continued use.
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Old 03-29-2014, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Actually, private autos were invented about the same time as electric streetcars. Private autos were more of a novelty until public roads with hard surfaces were common enough to facilitate driving--and the lobbyists of the auto and road-building industries (and the oil and tire industries) who pushed for laws that made electric streetcar companies unsustainable (specifically, laws that prohibited electric utilities from operating streetcar lines) and public-funded roads, which shifted the cost of transportation from the customers who rode the lines to taxpayers in general. So no, it wasn't just the coup de grace, the industries involved in the automobile and road industries also engaged in all the other phases of beating the private streetcar and interurban railroad industry to death.
Ummm ... public roads date from the mid-1800s when they started replacing private toll roads (turnpikes) that failed. By the time the automobile came along, the US had had public highways for at least half a century.

Hard surfaced public roads were pushed in the 1890s-1900s by bicycle enthusiasts who were much more numerous than automobile owners at the time.

The automobile became popular after WW I when the Ford Motor Company started producing one (Model T) that lots of people could afford. The rise of the automobile in the 1920s is analogous to the rise of the home computer, both of which became increasingly commonplace as their prices dropped.
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Old 03-30-2014, 07:25 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^Since this is Sunday, I'm going to say "Amen, Amen, It Shall be So!" Thank you, thank you, thank you, Linda_d!

Another place there were always public roads was in the cities themselves!
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Old 03-30-2014, 01:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
Ummm ... public roads date from the mid-1800s when they started replacing private toll roads (turnpikes) that failed. By the time the automobile came along, the US had had public highways for at least half a century.

Hard surfaced public roads were pushed in the 1890s-1900s by bicycle enthusiasts who were much more numerous than automobile owners at the time.

The automobile became popular after WW I when the Ford Motor Company started producing one (Model T) that lots of people could afford. The rise of the automobile in the 1920s is analogous to the rise of the home computer, both of which became increasingly commonplace as their prices dropped.
Those 19th century public roads weren't hard-surfaced (they were typically gravel, cinder, or macadam at best, but more typically were dirt ruts) until the "Good Roads Movement" joined forces with the lobbyists for the people who built roads--and big publicized efforts like the 1919 Motor Transport Convoy, a transcontinental trip along those public roads, which required military vehicles to cross the muddy, inhospitable roads of the era.

The rise of the automobile in the 1920s is actually more analogous to the rise of the home computer in the 1990, when there was a government-funded "information superhighway" to operate it (the Internet, and the World Wide Web, were originally developed by DARPA and other government/military-funded sicence labs.) The home computer of the 1970s and 80s was still an expensive toy for most--the bare-bones Apple II cost $1298 in 1977, which is the equivalent of $5000 in 2014 dollars, and there was almost no online communication infrastructure other than 150/300 baud acoustic-coupler handsets for dialing into corporate/government mainframes. There were cheaper computers, but they were either hobbyist kits well above the complexity level of the average buyer like the Altair, or extremely low-powered toys like the VIC-20, Atari 400 or Timex-Sinclair, which were primarily game platforms, more like a "go-cart" for kids to play with than an automobile.

The World Wide Web became the "highway" for computers, decades later, although the Internet had been the realm of hobbyists and academics for quite a while. Later operating systems like MacOS and Microsoft Windows, combined with more powerful and cheaper hardware, made the PC simple enough for most people to use--you didn't have to learn how to deal with a UNIX command-line or program in BASIC to get a computer to do something immediately useful. Only when the devices and the infrastructure were available did home computers become as universal as they are today.

Along the same vein, automobiles weren't invented in the 1920s, they first arrived in the late 1880s but were considered a rich man's novelty until after World War I, because the infrastructure for their use as serious transportation didn't exist yet. The shift to mass production of roads and vehicles arrived at about the same time.
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Old 03-30-2014, 02:48 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^The earliest paved roads were in Iraq, in 4000 BC. were of stone. McAdam, for whom the macadam paving was named, was born in 1756, did his work in the FIRST part of the 19th century. It's just NOT TRUE that there was no paving before 1920. ** The famous Champs-Elysees of the 1600s was covered with asphalt in 1824 signifying it as the first modern road in Europe. By the late 1800s, America would be paving roads. One of the first was Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington D.C.**
Building Roads - Back in Time - General Highway History - Highway History - Federal Highway Administration

Road building is not analogous to the WWW, sorry. And lowering the price of the automobile so the "common man" (your guru) could afford it is what made cars ubiquitous in the US.

ETA: Here's a link with some info about PUBLIC roads, and Roman road building
http://www.triplenine.org/articles/roadbuilding.asp
**Without doubt, the champion road builders of them all were the ancient Romans, who, until modern times, built the world's straightest, best engineered, and most complex network of roads in the world. At their height, the Roman Empire maintained 53,000 miles of roads, which covered all of England to the north, most of Western Europe, radiated throughout the Iberian Peninsula, and encircled and crisscrossed the entire Mediterranean area. Famous for their straightness, Roman roads were composed of a graded soil foundation topped by four courses: a bedding of sand or mortar; rows of large, flat stones; a thin layer of gravel mixed with lime; and a thin surface of flint-like lava. . . . Under Roman law, the public had the right to use the roads, but the district through which a road passed was responsible for the maintenance of the roadway. **

This link also references the Incas, again McAdam, and road building in the US.
**Before proceeding with motor vehicles, we have to give some credit to bicycles for bringing attention to the need for good roads, since these two-wheeled vehicles enjoyed enormous popularity in the late 19th century. Many clubs and cycling societies sprang up, including the League of American Wheelmen, a national organization founded in 1880 whose members began crying out for better roads. The first definite success of the fledgling Good Roads Movement was achieved in 1891, when New Jersey became the first state to take responsibility at the state level for improving roads and formed a State Highway Department. Massachusetts followed this example in 1892, and by 1917 all the states had adopted similar programs.**

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 03-30-2014 at 03:05 PM..
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Old 03-30-2014, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,674,744 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post

This link also references the Incas, again McAdam, and road building in the US.
**Before proceeding with motor vehicles, we have to give some credit to bicycles for bringing attention to the need for good roads, since these two-wheeled vehicles enjoyed enormous popularity in the late 19th century. Many clubs and cycling societies sprang up, including the League of American Wheelmen, a national organization founded in 1880 whose members began crying out for better roads. The first definite success of the fledgling Good Roads Movement was achieved in 1891, when New Jersey became the first state to take responsibility at the state level for improving roads and formed a State Highway Department. Massachusetts followed this example in 1892, and by 1917 all the states had adopted similar programs.**
It is ironic that without the bicyclists we wouldn't have had the road infrastructure that made car travel speedy and practical, and now it is hard to get the cars to share the roads with bikes.
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