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Old 03-11-2014, 11:58 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,567,280 times
Reputation: 4048

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gureentree View Post
Phoenix,AZ. Hot as hell during the summer, nothing is central. People avoid downtown besides basketball and baseball games. Even the football and soccer games are in the middle of no where. I ride my bicycle, but come July, it will be a weird choice. Either ride 15 min in 115 - 120 degree summer and stink when you get there or drive the car for 5 min in 115-120 degree. Obviously the choice is clear.

I am sure many more people would take public transit if cities were planned better with a central entertainment district, central business district, and central living district. You could easily design a city like this without involving any specific city in an area, but make it a neutral area. But noooo, let's cluster F everything in randomness.
Cities used to have a "central living district." Moving the residential out of downtowns and into distant suburbs was a feature of the mid-century transition that split our lives into chunks so far apart that the only way to get between them was to drive. But a lot of cities are turning their downtowns back into "central living districts." They don't have to make people want to move downtown, they already do, and there is no need to encourage, cajole or force people who don't want to live downtown to do so.

That randomness, that centerless, meaningless blob, is what we call "sprawl"--a city deliberately un-designed and un-centered so there is nothing to care about and nowhere to call home. Perpetually dissatisfied people are easier to convince that more stuff will make them happy--and to hold all that stuff, they'll need a big house with a garage. Of course, the house is also stuff.
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Old 03-12-2014, 03:55 AM
 
12,300 posts, read 15,202,635 times
Reputation: 8108
No transit station near home
No transit station near destination
Too slow
Inadequate service between origin and destination
Too slow
Too expensive
Inadequate parking near boarding station
Riders too scary
Too noisy
Condition of equipment
Only buses available

An example: You live 20 miles north of the office. The main rail line runs north-south. But you would have to drive four miles to boarding station and there is poor or no transit from destination station to your office. And you often work late.
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Old 03-12-2014, 05:45 AM
 
4,750 posts, read 3,498,948 times
Reputation: 4944
Why? Because there's people on it.
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Old 03-12-2014, 05:46 AM
 
28,905 posts, read 46,745,065 times
Reputation: 46028
Well, the other thing is that the energy cost per passenger mile using an automobile vs. mass transit has plunged since 1970. It used to be that a passenger mile using a car used twice as much energy as mass transit. According to a new DOE study, it's now somewhere around a 1:1 ratio, thanks to improved gas mileage.
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Old 03-12-2014, 05:52 AM
 
395 posts, read 450,998 times
Reputation: 414
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
There are many high-tech solutions to these problems. In this case, the invention is called "the wheel." You don't have to drag the bag of cat litter home, because wheels roll. If you have to drag the cart, it's not a cart, it's a sled--which might actually make things easier if you're picking up kitty litter in a winter climate. It's a five-block walk, not a big deal--one of the pluses of a "walkable" neighborhood is proximity to businesses. In fact, there's a dog-washing/pet-food store that is even closer, sells my cat's preferred brand, and both are on my walk home from work.
I feel so lucky, I can walk to my neighbourhood market for fresh things, and buy packaged stuff on the computer, for them to deliver a few days later.
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Old 03-12-2014, 06:13 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
10,238 posts, read 18,754,637 times
Reputation: 10164
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Yup then maybe that bike ride is your warmup.

It depends....but if you lets say have a goal of being "active" for 2 hours adding activity to your commute cuts off one item on your to do list.
Many people do physically rigorous work, they don't need extra exercise.
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Old 03-12-2014, 07:15 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,989,613 times
Reputation: 14810
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
The problem with this stat, is it doesn't account for people who can't actually drive the car. About 10% of adults do not have licenses. 20% of the population is under driving age. Some people have aged out if driving. And there is another percentage of people who temporarily do not have access to license. And of course the people who might have access to a car but can't afford to put gas in it or get insurance etc. And people with disabilities that do not allow them to drive.

That adds up to quite a few people who can't actually drive (in a practical sense).
Also, households with multiple people with one car.
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Old 03-12-2014, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,252,873 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I'll go ahead and check off mine for fun:

NPR (check) - NPR newbie
Obama voter (2008 Primary) (check)
Whole Foods/TJ shopper (check)
Degree from prestigious liberal arts school (automatic) - went to Berkeley, so I am sure that counts
Fair trade coffee (check)
Farmer's market (check)

But I am black so that's like minus 1000 points.
Haha. No, you can still be very SWPL. However, the list for someone entrenched in bourgeois upper middle class black culture (or "SBPL" if you will) looks different.

Love Jones (check)
Hookah (check)
Natural Hair (check)
Alvin Ailey (check)
Baked/grilled/sauteed chicken (check)
Complete Cosby Show Blu Ray Collection (check)
Melissa Harris-Perry show (check)
Esperanza Spalding/John Legend/Janelle Monae albums (check)
VH1 Soul (check)
Jack & Jill (check)

Last edited by BajanYankee; 03-12-2014 at 07:50 AM..
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Old 03-12-2014, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,252,873 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
The problem with this stat, is it doesn't account for people who can't actually drive the car. About 10% of adults do not have licenses. 20% of the population is under driving age. Some people have aged out if driving. And there is another percentage of people who temporarily do not have access to license. And of course the people who might have access to a car but can't afford to put gas in it or get insurance etc. And people with disabilities that do not allow them to drive.

That adds up to quite a few people who can't actually drive (in a practical sense).
Children technically have public transportation; it's called a big yellow bus. As much as I'm sure bored teenagers in the suburbs hate being stuck in the house on a Saturday night, their mobility is pretty far down on the list as far as I'm concerned.
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Old 03-12-2014, 08:01 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,011 posts, read 102,621,396 times
Reputation: 33075
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
The problem with this stat, is it doesn't account for people who can't actually drive the car. About 10% of adults do not have licenses. 20% of the population is under driving age. Some people have aged out if driving. And there is another percentage of people who temporarily do not have access to license. And of course the people who might have access to a car but can't afford to put gas in it or get insurance etc. And people with disabilities that do not allow them to drive.

That adds up to quite a few people who can't actually drive (in a practical sense).
Having worked in public sector health care, I can tell you not having a license does not deter some people. (Not that I recommend driving w/o one!) The under driving age comment is disingenuous. Yes, you have to be 16-18 to get a license in most states. But the vast, vast majority of these kids have "access" to a car in that their parents have at least one. Just go past any school in the morning or at dismissal. My statement was about access to a car, not ability to drive one. My MIL (age 94) does not drive any more, but if she needs a ride somewhere, she calls her son (not the DH, a different one).

Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Cities used to have a "central living district." Moving the residential out of downtowns and into distant suburbs was a feature of the mid-century transition that split our lives into chunks so far apart that the only way to get between them was to drive. But a lot of cities are turning their downtowns back into "central living districts." They don't have to make people want to move downtown, they already do, and there is no need to encourage, cajole or force people who don't want to live downtown to do so.

That randomness, that centerless, meaningless blob, is what we call "sprawl"--a city deliberately un-designed and un-centered so there is nothing to care about and nowhere to call home. Perpetually dissatisfied people are easier to convince that more stuff will make them happy--and to hold all that stuff, they'll need a big house with a garage. Of course, the house is also stuff.
Now, we've been down this road before, too! I've lived in a number of old cities. None had residential areas inside the downtown shopping areas. There are always a few people living "above the store", etc, but no, even old cities have distinct living and shopping areas. Ditto everywhere I've seen in Canada and Europe.

And quit this damned psychologizing! Just because some people choose to have different posessions than you does not make them mentally ill.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Also, households with multiple people with one car.
Access.
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