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Old 03-31-2014, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,391 posts, read 59,868,870 times
Reputation: 54036

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
They also live in very moderate/mild climates. Spending 20 minutes walking to a bus stop and then waiting for a bus in 10 degree temps with a 20 mph wind creating a -25 degree wind chill will disabuse even the most ardent transit support of his/her love of buses if he/she has to do it every work day for a couple of weeks. That's the kind of February and March that a lot of the Great Lakes area has suffered through this winter.
When I worked in downtown Cincinnati, I took the bus on horribly rainy or snowy days because the bus stop was closer than the parking lot I used, and Cincinnati drivers suck in rain and snow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Only a handful of places have perfect bike riding weather all year, but no place has weather that is too unpleasant for bike riding 365 days a year (well where people actually settled).
Philly has an average of 119 days a year with measurable precipitation. Add to that the winter days when the temps are below freezing (usually not more than a 15-20; this winter was absurdly cold), summer temps that climb well over 85 four months out of the year, and factor in an average humidity of 78 percent ... There's something to be said for climate controlled transportation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Also, the physical exertion of tooling around at 10-12 mph isn't very intense. Until you start fighting the wind around 16 mph or so
Or climbing hills.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
That's right! At $5/min, that's only $100/day in late charges.
Don't forget to add in the cost of the beer. Let's say we're on a budget and drinking cheap beer at $5 a glass, that's another $100 a month. More if you're a fast drinker or if you've just missed that bus and can pound two beers in that space of time ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I don't know. Considering the number of extra accidents, particularly early in the rainy season around here, taking a trip that doesn't require the roads is much more predictable
In most areas, that rules out buses as well. And bikes. Shoe leather express, anyone?
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Old 03-31-2014, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,072 posts, read 16,094,154 times
Reputation: 12647
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
But the thing is, transit to SF is actually pretty predictable (well as long as you are coming from/going to outside of SF). I have had plenty of coworkers over the years (who were parents) who managed just fine via transit to pick up their kids on time. During my 3 years of taking the bus or train to SF, I was only delayed more than 10 minutes a few times. Definitely less than 10. Once was when someone threatened to shoot someone on the Bay Bridge (so obviously the drivers were dissed too). Another day there was an incident in the PM on the bridge (I don't recall what it was). And there was another day where someone was running around the roof of BART that caused a delay. I don't remember the other ones. But it was pretty rare. Definitely not enough to worry about. Most of the time, the bus arrived within 5 minutes of the scheduled time.

On the other hand the drive time could easily range over a 30 minute spread for a myriad of reasons. And my current commute is the same, I have a 30 minute spread. Usually it takes me 45 minutes, but it has taken up to 30 minutes more. And 10 minutes less. IF I hypothetically had kids to pick up at 6, I'd need to leave at 4:15 or 4:30 since the driving time is so unpredictable. One of my coworkers just started to leave at 3:30, just to ensure she makes it home before 6 to pick up her kids (she drives since transit is really really inconvenient from her vantage point in SF to get to our Peninsula office.)
All true. That's one of the reasons I take BART into San Francisco as opposed to driving. That doesn't always work since sometimes I need to get form San Francisco to somewhere else in the afternoon where transit isn't convenient (most of the Bay) and I do have to drive. Fortunately then I'm leaving before rush hour.
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Old 03-31-2014, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
Reputation: 11726
WMATA must be the most unreliable transit system on Earth. This notice was issued a couple of hours ago.

Metro Warns of Problems on Blue, Orange Lines for PM Commute | ARLnow.com

Best comment from the article.

Quote:
Metro is suggesting that commuters purchase a car in the District and drive home this evening.
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Old 03-31-2014, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,686,954 times
Reputation: 26671
Transportation math can be complicated. Once you factor in cost of parking, congestion and other things. I factor in the time it takes to find a spot and the cost for that spot.

I live about 1.5 miles from downtown Oakland. Even though some of the buses from my neighborhood do not run especially frequently, there are times that the bus is just way faster. For example, on first Fridays (art gallery day) parking is really hard to find in most of downtown after 5:30 or so. One time I drove and I basically ended up parking 3/4 of a mile from my place. That was the day I decided to stop driving (I am the official driver in my circle since I have lots of friends who don't drive. I end up being carpool mom on the way home.) Now I am like, sorry guys I took the bus. I hate circling around the block for parking. It is faster to just wait for the bus, even though it is only a little bit down the road. And if we try and travel across most of downtown to the waterfront, we just take the free shuttle (it is about 1.5 miles from Uptown to the Water. I live about 1.5 miles from Uptown)

On the weekend? Meters are $2/hour and many are limited to 2 hours. So I take the bus over to downtown. It works out to be the same price if I stay for 2 hours (factoring the gas in, the bus fare is $2.10). And obviously cheaper if I stay longer (and less risk of getting a ticket or wasting time moving my car).

Now I'll probably just bike. But since First Friday is popular with hipsters, I hope bike parking is easy. `

My beef is, as it always is, there are plenty of scenarios where transit could work out, if we prioritized making it a feasible option. It doesn't need to be in every neighborhood. I have decent transit service, but considering the density of my area, and the neighboring blocks we are under served by transit. Density is 10k-20k depending on the block within 1/2 mile radius of my place, those denser blocks actually have worse transit access than I do. And those blocks have less parking than mine do. If there was better transit, it wouldn't be such a problem. But you know, we have to fund in frequent transit to neighborhoods that won't use it, and those people bring their cars. (Although honestly, car ownership is lower over there compared to other parts of the city. You just need to be OK with walking further to get to the bus, it is a very "young" neighborhood in that section.
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Old 03-31-2014, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
My beef is, as it always is, there are plenty of scenarios where transit could work out, if we prioritized making it a feasible option.
But who wants to structure their lives around riding public transit? You really have to want to ride in those steel cans. If it's faster, then it's a no brainer. But in most situations, running to Hooters to grab hot wings before the NBA Finals comes on can be accomplished much faster by driving than transit. I'm not going to expend mental energy figuring out how to ride transit to get there when I can just get in a car and go.
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Old 03-31-2014, 04:11 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,569,036 times
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When I was in grad school (just a few years ago) I started taking transit instead of driving to class because driving meant walking through a parking lot that was usually a longer walk to class than the transit center, which had a rain shelter. I spent more time getting rained on when I drove to campus than when I took transit, which helped promote a mode shift. The fact that my student ID served as a free bus pass, while parking required a semester parking pass or a $7 a day parking permit, didn't hurt either. Every student who took transit or biked to campus saved the campus the cost and space of a campus parking space, on a campus with enormous parking lots that keep it separated from the surrounding city.
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Old 03-31-2014, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,686,954 times
Reputation: 26671
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
But who wants to structure their lives around riding public transit? You really have to want to ride in those steel cans. If it's faster, then it's a no brainer. But in most situations, running to Hooters to grab hot wings before the NBA Finals comes on can be accomplished much faster by driving than transit. I'm not going to expend mental energy figuring out how to ride transit to get there when I can just get in a car and go.
When you have decent transit, there is no "structuring your life around transit."

Now it is even easy to get real time arrivals. So you know, if you should pack up now or grab another beer with your friend.
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Old 03-31-2014, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
When you have decent transit, there is no "structuring your life around transit.
I guess DC is not one of those cities with "decent transit" then.
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Old 03-31-2014, 05:06 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,861,397 times
Reputation: 1439
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
When you have decent transit, there is no "structuring your life around transit."

Now it is even easy to get real time arrivals. So you know, if you should pack up now or grab another beer with your friend.
If you use transit you can't help but structure your life around it. There are routes that don't run all day and routes that have less service after a certain time. This has an huge impact on when and where you may travel as well as how long it will take you to travel there.
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Old 03-31-2014, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,334,770 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Well a car is still being inside. My point was: if weather is such a big deal, you could just choose never to be outside and avoid uncomfortable weather, and stay indoors all day. But at some point being inside all the time gets be a bit much.
When I walk my dog in the winter or when I go snow shoeing, I'm dressed appropriately. Most work-appropriate attire simply isn't warm enough.
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