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Old 04-04-2014, 01:37 PM
Zot
 
Location: 3rd rock from a nearby star
468 posts, read 580,766 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Thoughts?
In my personal experience public transit is inconvenient, expensive, and sucks. Aside from that, it's all good.

Last edited by Zot; 04-04-2014 at 02:08 PM..
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Old 04-04-2014, 02:20 PM
 
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Of course, it depends on where you live. I have lived in very large metropolitan areas and have used mass transit quite often since being in high school. I believe most people will use mass transit if it saves them money and it is not very inconvenient in terms of how long it takes them to get from point A to point B. I would say cost and convenience are the driving factors for most people who live in an area of adequate mass transit.
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Old 04-04-2014, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,514,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huckleberry3911948 View Post
Not if u have been mugged
It is still an incorrect generalization. What if you get carjacked or robbed in the parking lot while getting into your car. Does that mean all car driving is bad because of it?
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Old 04-04-2014, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
What ohiogirl81 and Linda_d said. I'm not the only one who picked up on the mockery when I posted those pictures of "town squares I have known". Those are places where my family has personally lived; I've spent a lot of time there.
Actually I really liked the places you posted even though they weren't town squares. They were nice small towns, very well done fountains and statues in the middle of the road. So I am not sure what parks I have mocked are.






Quote:
Let me ask you-why would an open public space commonly found in the heart of a traditional town used for community gatherings, not be a town square? Many people have posted pictures of park-like settings with people gathered about. Obama was speaking in a couple of pictures taken in Beaver, PA. Some "Occupy Chambersburg" people were speaking in another. Yes, they're used as parks (Beaver) or simply as places to sit on a bench and eat lunch (Chambersbug) when something else isn't going on there. Big whoop!
It depends on how the park is designed. Not all parks are town squares. Town squares can have park like settings, but it depends on how those settings are used to define if it is a park or a town square. It isn't really that hard, should I show you more examples the differences and similarities? There have already been a great amount posted in this thread already.
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Old 04-04-2014, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Most that have been posted in your "town squares" thread are parks. Even some of the urbanists are posting and discussing the park systems of their cities. Since when are parks not a gathering spot for a community?

No, I don't need any more of your patronization, thank you very much.
Yes, some parks can be town squares, but not all parks are town squares, but all town squares are parks, even when there are no grass and trees in them.
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Old 04-04-2014, 02:54 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Please post about town squares in the "town squares" thread. And avoid back and forth bickering.
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Old 04-04-2014, 03:02 PM
 
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As for the time factor, using transit may take more time but the time isn't always lost. You can't read or work while driving.
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Old 04-04-2014, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,660,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Really? I would have never guessed that.
Yep, the western neighborhoods have limited subway options into downtown. Only a bus on the crowded surface streets. There are other areas where you might need multiple transfers to get to downtown. When I worked in downtown SF, at the far end, I had a 15-20 minute bus ride (from Oakland) and a 15 minute walk. 75% of my coworkers lived in SF. It took me less time to get to work than half of them. The light rail, albeit speedier is notoriously flaky.

If you live on the "inner" portion of the Western Neighborhoods, it is about a 20-25 minute ride to downtown SF via light rail for around 3 miles. Headways top out at about 8-10 minutes during peak times but delays are pretty frequent, and sometimes the delay is really long.

From points not far from downtown Oakland, in the commute, the train operates at 10 minute headways from my closest station, and 5-8 for the station a little further away. (Train ride is 15-18 minutes). I live about 10 miles away from downtown SF.

SF is 7 miles by 7 miles, so transit should theoretically be pretty fast, but half the time the walk is faster. Biking is pretty popular for people who live in the "inner" western neighborhoods, because the light rail and bus options can be super slow. Other closer-in and flatter neighborhoods have a large portion of bicyclists since a bike is way faster than Muni which averages 8MPH across the entire system.

As an aside, when there is no traffic, from my place in Oakland it is a 12-15 minute drive to downtown SF. (as you can see it is hardly faster than the bus or train, at peak hours that drive takes 30+ minutes. The bus or train are pretty consistent at 15-20 minute, and it takes me 10 minutes to get to the train station by bus, car or bike give or take 3 minutes).

90% of the time I take transit to downtown SF, because it is basically the same amount of time factoring an optimistic 5-8 minutes it would take you to park, assuming it was readily available and the surface streets were empty. Reality is, parking adds 15 minutes, and the time savings for driving are nonexistent.
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Old 04-04-2014, 04:37 PM
 
4,064 posts, read 3,095,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
My little 'burb has a McDonald's and two Dunkin Donuts. So there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Mine actually has THREE Dunkin Donuts, though still only one McDonalds.
Sorry people you just can't compete with someone from Massachusetts when it comes to Dunkin' Donuts. I have you both beat. The town I lived in as a child has seven (7) Dunkin' Donuts (and 20 within a 5 mile radius - 01821). And don't forget the apostrophe!

Restaurant Locator | Dunkin' Donuts
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Old 04-04-2014, 04:49 PM
 
4,064 posts, read 3,095,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zelpha View Post
In a car you can go from point A to point B independently.

Mass transit is environmentally & ecologically & socially beneficial, but inefficient for the individual.
This sums up the whole issue perfectly. People with individualistic tendencies will prefer cars while people with collectivist tendencies with prefer mass transit.
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