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Old 04-09-2014, 06:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
This data includes work and non-work trips. So just to reiterate, a lot of people make a lot of really short trips, that potentially could be done without a car.
Three miles is really short... in a car. Walking, it's not short at all, it's an hour each way. Taking a bus, a bit over 10 minutes IF it doesn't have too many stop and IF it goes exactly from where you want to be to exactly where you want to go when you want to go.
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Old 04-09-2014, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Three miles is really short... in a car. Walking, it's not short at all, it's an hour each way. Taking a bus, a bit over 10 minutes IF it doesn't have too many stop and IF it goes exactly from where you want to be to exactly where you want to go when you want to go.
Three miles is easily bikeable.
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Old 04-09-2014, 08:28 PM
 
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Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Three miles is easily bikeable.
Depends on the three miles. Try biking these three sometime:
http://goo.gl/maps/aayLJ
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Old 04-09-2014, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Depends on the three miles. Try biking these three sometime:
http://goo.gl/maps/aayLJ
I wouldn't bike anywhere in Jersey, the people who drive here are nuts, I barely feel safe enough to walk here without some idiot running me over. Stop signs are just a suggestion for Jersey drivers.
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Old 04-09-2014, 08:47 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Portland drivers are weird.
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Old 04-09-2014, 08:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I wouldn't bike anywhere in Jersey, the people who drive here are nuts, I barely feel safe enough to walk here without some idiot running me over. Stop signs are just a suggestion for Jersey drivers.
Depends where really.

I'd never do it in Hudson County, would with caution in southern Bergen County, and would with absolute confidence in my safety in northern Bergen County. It really just boils down to density - biking is safer and more pleasant where things are less dense, and drivers are more respectful towards bikers where they are more of a normal occurrence and not just That Guy.
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Old 04-09-2014, 09:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
The odd I commented was mainly that mainly that light/rapid transit distinction in train size is gone. In Rennes' case, running slightly smaller trains more often results in more capacity. Rennes complete grade separation probably allow longer frequencies. If the trains have a driver, increased frequency has more of an additional cost. With drivers, less frequent longer trains save money.
Err not really. If the train has a driver you can just couple more cars together for both light rail and rapid transit. I suspect they chose the smaller trains for whatever reason because normally you would want as much compatibility with other train systems if possible(allows for easy extension or connection to other lines, more availability of parts, trained workers, ect..).That thing looks like an airport people mover. Yeap, just checked it is similar to the one at O'hare. That line is also pretty short just 5.8 miles. My guess the line is too short for any normal city rail system but for some reason rail was preferred over bus.

Last edited by chirack; 04-09-2014 at 09:14 PM..
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Old 04-09-2014, 09:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALackOfCreativity View Post
Depends where really.

I'd never do it in Hudson County, would with caution in southern Bergen County, and would with absolute confidence in my safety in northern Bergen County. It really just boils down to density - biking is safer and more pleasant where things are less dense, and drivers are more respectful towards bikers where they are more of a normal occurrence and not just That Guy.
The location I posted was Essex County, and the traffic (while bad enough) wasn't the issue; there's a reason the map was set to terrain mode.
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Old 04-09-2014, 09:15 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Err not really. If the train has a driver you can just couple more cars together for both light rail and rapid transit. I suspect they chose the smaller trains for whatever reason because normally you would want as much compatibility with other train systems if possible(allows for easy extension or connection to other lines, more availability of parts, trained workers, ect..).That thing looks like an airport people mover. Yeap, just checked it is similar to the one at O'hare. That line is also pretty short just 5.8 miles. My guess the line is too short for any normal city rail system but for some reason rail was preferred over bus.
Which is what I said. For a driverless system, you can run shorter trains more often without high labor costs, gaining extra frequency.

The train system is used in a number of new French systems. That 5.8 mile line has 130,000 weekday riders, that would be a very high volume bus line. A couple of NYC short shuttle subway lines run 2 cars using regular subway stock, it's simpler to use the same rolling stock even the trains are light rail length.
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Old 04-09-2014, 10:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Which is what I said. For a driverless system, you can run shorter trains more often without high labor costs, gaining extra frequency.

The train system is used in a number of new French systems. That 5.8 mile line has 130,000 weekday riders, that would be a very high volume bus line. A couple of NYC short shuttle subway lines run 2 cars using regular subway stock, it's simpler to use the same rolling stock even the trains are light rail length.
CTA does outside of rush hour. Car lengths vary 2,4,6, or 8. Yeap, makes sense why they would choose rail for the trip. Given the whole line is like 5 miles long, I suspect frequency comes more from having an short route. To put things in perspective the people mover at O'hare is 2.7 miles long, this thing is a little over double that.
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