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Old 04-10-2014, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,504,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALackOfCreativity View Post
Depends where really.

I'd never do it in Hudson County, would with caution in southern Bergen County, and would with absolute confidence in my safety in northern Bergen County. It really just boils down to density - biking is safer and more pleasant where things are less dense, and drivers are more respectful towards bikers where they are more of a normal occurrence and not just That Guy.
That isn't always the case, I would feel much safer biking in Brooklyn than I would anywhere in Hudson county. The awareness to bikes and pedestrians from drivers goes a long way.
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Old 04-10-2014, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,504,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
The location I posted was Essex County, and the traffic (while bad enough) wasn't the issue; there's a reason the map was set to terrain mode.
With biking, terrain isn't really as big of an issue as you would think, but then again I did my biking on the west coast where the terrain is just part of biking.
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Old 04-10-2014, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,650,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That isn't always the case, I would feel much safer biking in Brooklyn than I would anywhere in Hudson county. The awareness to bikes and pedestrians from drivers goes a long way.
I agree about the awareness piece. I am way more comfortable biking at home because there are so many cyclists and tons more awareness from the drivers. Where I work, potentially "easier" with wider roads and flatter paths is terrible because the number of cyclists are few and far between. And all of them are on the sidewalk. I have see a few people trying to mix with traffic, and cars honking angrily, speeding past them without leaving space, and all of the stereotypical aggressive behaviors.

No thanks, that just looks scary. It is hard enough being a pedestrian. Even though there are crosswalks and sidewalks, you need to be on high alert to cross the street, and the lights are timed poorly (you can walk an entire block between the signal timing before it will change for you!).
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Old 04-10-2014, 09:48 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,816,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
With biking, terrain isn't really as big of an issue as you would think
I don't just think; I know that hill quite well. It's a big issue. On a road bike it's difficult; on a commuter-type bike (heavier, in street clothes and with a backpack), it's awful.

Quote:
but then again I did my biking on the west coast where the terrain is just part of biking.
Depends on where. Silicon Valley, for instance, has a bay on one side and hills on the other. The most populated areas on the peninsula are actually quite flat.
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Old 04-10-2014, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,504,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
I don't just think; I know that hill quite well. It's a big issue. On a road bike it's difficult; on a commuter-type bike (heavier, in street clothes and with a backpack), it's awful.


Depends on where. Silicon Valley, for instance, has a bay on one side and hills on the other. The most populated areas on the peninsula are actually quite flat.
I wouldn't bike up that hill without bike lanes, not in this state with New Jersey drivers, but I have seen guys bike up North Interstate in Portland on fix gear bikes before. I wouldn't advise a hill like this for someone who doesn't have the leg strength, but if you have the gearing on a bike to handle something like this, it would be fine. You would definitely have a sense of accomplishment biking up a hill like that, though it would be more fun to ride down that hill than push up it.
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Old 04-12-2014, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,324,391 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
So people shouldn't walk anywhere in fear of muggings? What if you get mugged as you are getting into your car?
No, my point was that bad things can happen whether you are using your own vehicle or mass transit.
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Old 04-12-2014, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,504,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
No, my point was that bad things can happen whether you are using your own vehicle or mass transit.
True, bad things can happen regardless if you get out of bed or not.
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Old 03-08-2015, 05:03 PM
 
12,291 posts, read 15,184,803 times
Reputation: 8100
Good mass transit is available in only a few metros, and even there not as comprehensive. Buses are horrible in most locations. The Cardinal of Chicago, upon being told that the new Pope used to ride the bus in Brazil, "Maybe the buses are reliable there." Rail is more attractive, but there are ways to improve buses: entertainment options, signal priority, special lanes where necessary. If the powers that be could be convinced to do so.
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Old 03-08-2015, 05:29 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,890,268 times
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Basically some have to ;otherwise most can make better use of the time involved in using it.
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Old 03-12-2015, 08:56 AM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,039,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALackOfCreativity View Post
Depends where really.

I'd never do it in Hudson County, would with caution in southern Bergen County, and would with absolute confidence in my safety in northern Bergen County. It really just boils down to density - biking is safer and more pleasant where things are less dense, and drivers are more respectful towards bikers where they are more of a normal occurrence and not just That Guy.

I did a lot of biking as a kid, all west of Route 17 where the density is low(er). Drivers were no problem, only the terrain (elevation rises to the north). But 17 was too scary for me to try to cross.
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