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Old 03-17-2014, 07:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Everyone likes to point to the inability of older cities to annex surrounding areas when a city faces hardships but I an starting to feel that this is a cop out.

If a city has access to the natural resources it needs I am a bit confused as to the purpose of annexation when cities would be better served increasing infrastructure within city limits to accommodate increased density, as opposed to taking on urban sprawl associated with low density. Is annexation everything, or just another way for cities to grow?
I think it's a cop out, and I think Boston is a pretty clear example of it. The city boundaries are largely absurd, with Hyde Park being in the city, while Brookline is surrounded on 3 sides by the city, Cambridge being walking distance from downtown, and Somerville not far behind.

That isn't to say that annexation wouldn't have helped, just that clearly it hasn't been necessary.
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Old 03-17-2014, 07:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
Maybe so, but they don't get to vote on it and the city isn't doing it for the benefit of the then non-residents!
Not all annexations are not voted on. Depends on the laws of the state. In the case of Chicago both the city and the burb to be annexed had to vote in favor. Chicago's growth only stopped when the burbs stopped voting in favor and even today there are two small burbs surrounded on 3-4 sides by the city itself. The city did use eminent domain to take some land from burbs to expand O'Hare and a land fill recently did the same to the city to take some houses to expand the fill.
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Old 03-17-2014, 08:12 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Which is how large cities such as New York and Chicago grew in the past. Often famous neighborhoods where separate towns.
Denver, too. We once lived in an area of Denver that had once been an independent town.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
Maybe so, but they don't get to vote on it and the city isn't doing it for the benefit of the then non-residents!
You don't know Colorado! We vote on everything. For Denver to annex any piece of land at all, the voters of both counties (Denver County and the county where the proposed annexation is) have to vote in favor. For other cities, if 100% of the owners of an area petitioning for annexation agree, no election is needed. However, if that is not the case, and election must be held.
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...62922401,d.aWc
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Old 03-17-2014, 09:31 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,932,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
Everyone likes to point to the inability of older cities to annex surrounding areas when a city faces hardships but I an starting to feel that this is a cop out.

If a city has access to the natural resources it needs I am a bit confused as to the purpose of annexation when cities would be better served increasing infrastructure within city limits to accommodate increased density, as opposed to taking on urban sprawl associated with low density. Is annexation everything, or just another way for cities to grow?
What cites always need is tax base . Also private investment. Without it gets neither public or private infrastructure. With federal revenue sharing facing huge reductions its even more important than ever.
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Old 03-17-2014, 10:59 PM
 
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In California, annexation generally involves a vote of those in the area to be annexed rather than the city as a whole. The little unincorporated community of Freeport voted against annexation because they're still steamed about Sacramento taking their railroad line away back in 1865.
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Old 03-18-2014, 07:19 AM
bu2
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by demonta4 View Post
I live in a unincorporated area now. Five minutes from downtown Atlanta. I can see the skyline every time I go to the store.
I think you are making that up.

The trees and hills block your view from DeKalb County!!!
And it takes more than 5 minutes to get downtown from Vinings in Cobb County.

But yes, Atlanta has 100 year old suburbs still unincorporated. Major swaths of land across North Fulton and North DeKalb County have been incorporated in the last 10 years that had been developed but unincorporated, but there is every bit as much still unincorporated. The counties do a poor job pretending to be cities, which is why so many new cities have been formed recently. At least seven and a couple more just failed to get through the legislature this session.
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Old 03-18-2014, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
I think you are making that up.

The trees and hills block your view from DeKalb County!!!
And it takes more than 5 minutes to get downtown from Vinings in Cobb County.

But yes, Atlanta has 100 year old suburbs still unincorporated. Major swaths of land across North Fulton and North DeKalb County have been incorporated in the last 10 years that had been developed but unincorporated, but there is every bit as much still unincorporated. The counties do a poor job pretending to be cities, which is why so many new cities have been formed recently. At least seven and a couple more just failed to get through the legislature this session.
When was the last time Atlanta annexed?
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Old 03-18-2014, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,304 posts, read 10,766,103 times
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Annexation = Tax revenue

That is ALL annexation is about. Nothing else.
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Old 03-18-2014, 02:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
True. How many unincorporated places still exist as suburbs or exurbs of major metropolitan areas in this day and age?
Los Angeles County has plenty of unincorporated county islands. There's even a large area ("East LA") pretty much right next to Downtown LA that's unincorporated.

I live in one of the smaller suburban cities in LA County, and there's a block down the street that wasn't annexed for whatever reason 30-40 years ago. While we city residents utilize city services, the unincorporated county residents have to rely on LA County and contract services. So, if those county residents needed police or fire, they would have to wait for the LA County Sheriff or LA County Fire stationed in neighboring city to arrive... which could take 15-20 minutes. The city residents wouldn't need to wait long at all since our own stations are near the center of our small town.

On the flip side, county residents enjoy the less stringent county codes and regulations. For example, AFAIK, home owners on county land can have a swimming pool in front of the house and front fence taller than 4ft.
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Old 03-18-2014, 02:50 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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If there's a town/township government below the county level but otherwise nothing is it unincorporated? For example, anything listed under Hamlet is unincorporated and has no government power:

Hempstead, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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