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Old 03-18-2014, 03:16 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
If there's a town/township government below the county level but otherwise nothing is it unincorporated? For example, anything listed under Hamlet is unincorporated and has no government power:

Hempstead, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
I don't think town/townships are considered "unincorporated". Here in the west, some land has no other government than the county. There are a some areas around Denver like that.
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Old 03-18-2014, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genjy View Post
Los Angeles County has plenty of unincorporated county islands. There's even a large area ("East LA") pretty much right next to Downtown LA that's unincorporated.

I live in one of the smaller suburban cities in LA County, and there's a block down the street that wasn't annexed for whatever reason 30-40 years ago. While we city residents utilize city services, the unincorporated county residents have to rely on LA County and contract services. So, if those county residents needed police or fire, they would have to wait for the LA County Sheriff or LA County Fire stationed in neighboring city to arrive... which could take 15-20 minutes. The city residents wouldn't need to wait long at all since our own stations are near the center of our small town.

On the flip side, county residents enjoy the less stringent county codes and regulations. For example, AFAIK, home owners on county land can have a swimming pool in front of the house and front fence taller than 4ft.
Very interesting. Particularly with an area having as large of a population density.
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Old 03-18-2014, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
If there's a town/township government below the county level but otherwise nothing is it unincorporated? For example, anything listed under Hamlet is unincorporated and has no government power:

Hempstead, New York - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Hempsted is a town and in NY EVERY single speck of land IS incorporated. Why? ALL in the name of TAXES!

In NY, there are many towns that have hamlets and villages in them. The town is the government. If you're lucky enough to live in a village, then you have additional taxes, laws and regulations, and politicians to deal with.

No idea how you got the idea that anything listed under a hamlet is unincorporated and has no governmental power. That is completely FALSE in NY. The town is incorporated and the hamlet is part of that town thus has a government.
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Old 03-18-2014, 03:37 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
Hempsted is a town and in NY EVERY single speck of land IS incorporated. Why? ALL in the name of TAXES!

In NY, there are many towns that have hamlets and villages in them. The town is the government. If you're lucky enough to live in a village, then you have additional taxes, laws and regulations, and politicians to deal with.

No idea how you got the idea that anything listed under a hamlet is unincorporated and has no governmental power. That is completely FALSE in NY. The town is incorporated and the hamlet is part of that town thus has a government.
I used to live on Long Island. A hamlet has no government power, it's little more than the address. The town, of course, has government power.

But you could say the same about unincorportaed county land as described here. You pay taxes to the county and get county service and nothing more local. Uninoproated town land: you pay taxes to the town and get town services but nothing more local (like a village). Long Island towns have more people than many counties (the one I lived on has 200,000 people with barely anyone living in a smaller government unit, the one I linked to has 750,000 but that has a lot of villages)
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Old 03-18-2014, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I used to live on Long Island. A hamlet has no government power, it's little more than the address. The town, of course, has government power.

But you could say the same about unincorportaed county land as described here. You pay taxes to the county and get county service and nothing more local. Uninoproated town land: you pay taxes to the town and get town services but nothing more local (like a village). Long Island towns have more people than many counties (the one I lived on has 200,000 people with barely anyone living in a smaller government unit, the one I linked to has 750,000 but that has a lot of villages)
Again, there isn't a speck of land in NY that is not incorporated. This is not like SC where there's counties that half of aren't incorporated. NY loves their taxes. Being in a town is your local support.
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Old 03-18-2014, 06:06 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
Again, there isn't a speck of land in NY that is not incorporated. This is not like SC where there's counties that half of aren't incorporated. NY loves their taxes. Being in a town is your local support.
You're not following my post. I'm rather familiar with NY state, I know everything is in a town/township.
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Old 03-18-2014, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
You're not following my post. I'm rather familiar with NY state, I know everything is in a town/township.
No, I am following you said this:


But you could say the same about unincorportaed county land as described here. You pay taxes to the county and get county service and nothing more local. Uninoproated town land: you pay taxes to the town and get town services but nothing more local (like a village).



Everything in NY has been claimed. Has been for ages.

The parts of the country that have unincorporated areas like the South are run very differently as are the school systems. The schools systems were all run on the county level. Not one district for each little city, village, town, etc.

I lived in SC and schools were all on the county level. There were plenty of places unincorporated. I lived in one of those areas. You said you'd get county services in those areas. What services? No snow so no plows. Many cities don't even had trash pick up and the county certainly doesn't. There were county sheriffs, but they helped out in the incorporated cities as well. Many roads were state roads so that was a different ball of wax. Library and fire weren't included by the county. Those were additional taxes for each district.

Now that I'm back in NY, living in a town, I get way more for my buck. I pay for it too though. No library or fire tax here. It's not like that everywhere in NY though. I just live in a small town that's mostly agriculture so things are a bit different here.
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Old 03-18-2014, 07:50 PM
 
Location: plano
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The benefits of annexation should be economies of scale, that is efficiencies associated with scale a common reason to merge in the private sector. However in the public sector where efficiency is not common and politics are, this reason for annexation is mute
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Old 03-19-2014, 12:57 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,989,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
No, I am following you said this:


But you could say the same about unincorportaed county land as described here. You pay taxes to the county and get county service and nothing more local. Uninoproated town land: you pay taxes to the town and get town services but nothing more local (like a village).



Everything in NY has been claimed. Has been for ages.

The parts of the country that have unincorporated areas like the South are run very differently as are the school systems. The schools systems were all run on the county level. Not one district for each little city, village, town, etc.

I lived in SC and schools were all on the county level. There were plenty of places unincorporated. I lived in one of those areas. You said you'd get county services in those areas. What services? No snow so no plows. Many cities don't even had trash pick up and the county certainly doesn't. There were county sheriffs, but they helped out in the incorporated cities as well. Many roads were state roads so that was a different ball of wax. Library and fire weren't included by the county. Those were additional taxes for each district.

Now that I'm back in NY, living in a town, I get way more for my buck. I pay for it too though. No library or fire tax here. It's not like that everywhere in NY though. I just live in a small town that's mostly agriculture so things are a bit different here.
As I said I understand well how NY works. I don't know very much about the south or how unincorporated land works. I assumed it just government authority at a higher level.

However, I doubt unincorporated land works the same in Los Angeles County. The county must provide more government services, considering how built up some of the unincorporated areas are. It's a rather strange design there.
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Old 03-19-2014, 03:56 PM
 
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Here's a snippet from Wikipedia about "East Los Angeles":


As East Los Angeles is an unincorporated community, it does not have a local government, and relies on the County of Los Angeles for local services.

Despite multiple failed attempts in the past, residents are currently campaigning for cityhood for East Los Angeles.

Since East Los Angeles is an unincorporated area, fire protection in East Los Angeles is provided by the Los Angeles County Fire Department with ambulance transport by Care Ambulance Service.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department (LASD) operates the East Los Angeles Station in East Los Angeles.

The Los Angeles County Department of Health Services operates the Central Health Center in Downtown Los Angeles, serving East Los Angeles.

The United States Postal Service East Los Angeles Post Office is located at 975 South Atlantic Boulevard.



East Los Angeles, California - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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